Cherry Tomatoes

These black cherry tomatoes are always the first to come in.  Like the potatoes, they were planted late in a cold spring.   We do not expect to have enough for all the boxes until the middle of June, and maybe not until July. We do have a flavorful variety this year, cherries, red slicers, heirlooms, and Lorraine’s favorite the San Marzanos.  We are expecting a great crop.

Flower Power

I like to throw you all a curve ball each year, so what about a bunch of fresh or dried flowers in your box? I planted some flowers, such as statice, that you can enjoy fresh or dried. We try to put a lavender bunch in about once a year, so I thought I would try to change things up a bit.

Potatoes Finally Growing Well

Remember back in early February when it was raining cats and dogs?  That’s when our potato seed arrived and when we should have planted them.  As you know the rain never stopped, and the potatoes didn’t make it into the ground until March.  Then we had a cool Spring which meant they had a slow start.  Now they are growing like crazy, after they flower we will start to harvest in June, but later in the month.  The problem we can run into is getting them out of the ground fast enough because July can be too hot for them if they are still in the ground.  With lavender harvest, June is an extremely busy month, so it will be a challenge to this all done.  The seed comes from Colorado, where it is grown at high altitude, and aphids can not survive.  The aphids transfer a destructive virus, and as an organic farm, we do not have the option to spray.  New potatoes, fresh from the ground, is one of my favorite foods.

Lavender Harvest- A Magical Weekend

Take a moment– close your eyes.  Imagine with your mind’s eye the dappled morning light on acres of lavender, the sound of little birds (ok, mostly chickens) singing, s soft morning breeze on your face, and the scent of lavender transporting you to a place far, far away, Dixon!  

 Two years ago we tried something new when we organized the first Lavender Harvest weekend. Folks came up to help us fill the drying room with thousands of bunches of lavender.  It has been invaluable to have members come and help us power through the harvest, making it possible to get this done in just one weekend.  June is the busiest month of the year for the crew, and they simply do not have the time to do it on their own. Our dried lavender has become so popular we have run out about this time the last couple of years - we are down to our last box right now. It is a very valuable crop for us, and getting that much dried in one weekend is impossible without your help.

Much like the grape harvest in France where groups of strangers from all over gather to help bring the fruit in, spending days working together, eating great food, and making new friends, we have tried to create that same type of experience here with the lavender.  It is one of the most memorable experiences people have on the farm.

This year we hope to get close to 30 people up here to help. Nigel is hoping to pack even more bunches in, which is why we are opening this up to more people. The way it works is everyone comes up Friday evening and sets up camp. There will be a simple supper waiting for you whenever you arrive. We skip the formal dinner on Friday night since people get here at different times, but never worry, no one ever goes hungry here at Casa Eatwell!  

Saturday morning early we gather in the house for breakfast, safety meeting/training and then we head out into the lavender fields. The crew starts cutting the plants at about 6 am. The idea is they have a lot cut before we get out there, to keep ahead of us throughout the day.  We come back to the house for lunch, and then we head out to finish bunching what the crew has cut. Some folks work in the field bunching (rubber banding) and loading the truck and some folks will be in the drying room emptying the truck and hanging the bunches on the drying racks. When the day is done, everyone comes back into the house for a big hearty meal.

Sunday morning we start all over again and work till lunch. If all goes well, the drying room will be full and the work was done. There is a possibility of needing to work a bit more after lunch, but the goal is to get it all done beforehand.

This is a working weekend, so we ask that only adults come up. It is open to members and your invited guests.  And as with all events on the farm, no pets allowed.

THIS WEEK'S BOX: MAY 22ND- May 28TH

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Strawberries - Discard any bruised strawberries or freeze and use in a smoothie. Do not rinse until ready to eat. Strawberries don’t like to be wet. Keeps 2-3 days.

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Apricot - Set the bag out at room temperature, away from direct sunlight or heat. For the best tasting apricots, eat or use them within 2-3 days.

Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water. 

*Turnips - If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days.

Spinach- Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

*Collards - Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last 3-5 days.

*Lettuce - Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*Basil - Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week.

*Green Garlic - It is such a delight to have this back in our harvest shares. My favorite way to enjoy is to stir fry the chopped garlic in a skillet with some olive oil. Then stir in eggs for a delicious green garlic scrambled eggs. Store in the crisper. Will last at least a week.

Spring Onion - Spring onions are onions harvested at the immature stage when they have just begun to form their bulb and are still green on top. Their flavor is a little milder since they haven't yet fully developed. Spring onions should be kept in a closed container, to prevent drying out, in the refrigerator and should last a couple of weeks.

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Spinach Mac and Cheese

Miso-Butter Turnips and Greens

Swiss Chard or Collards Crostata with Fennel Seed Crust

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Spinach Mac and Cheese

3 TB unsalted Butter

1/2 cup minced Onion

1/3 cup All-purpose Flour

4 cups Whole Milk, room temperature

5 oz Gruyere Cheese, grated 2 cups

3/4 lb Elbow Macaroni

Shopping list for: Miso- Butter Turnips and Greens

2 TB unsalted Butter

2 TB Mirin

2 TB White Miso

Shopping list for: Swiss Chard or Collards Crostata with Fennel Seed Crust

3 TB. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1/2 tsp crushed Red Pepper flakes

2 tsp dried Italian Seasoning or us a few TB of fresh chopped Basil from this week’s share

2 pinches of ground Nutmeg

4 large Eggs

1/2 cup chopped Scallions, use the green tops from the onions in this week’s share

1 cup Ricotta Cheese 

1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan Cheese

Shopping list for All Recipes

3 TB. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1/2 tsp crushed Red Pepper flakes

2 tsp dried Italian Seasoning or us a few TB of fresh chopped Basil from this week’s share

2 pinches of ground Nutmeg

4 large Eggs

1/2 cup chopped Scallions, use the green tops from the onions in this week’s share

1 cup Ricotta Cheese 

1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan Cheese

5 TB unsalted Butter

2 TB Mirin

2 TB White Miso

1/2 cup minced Onion

1/3 cup All-purpose Flour

4 cups Whole Milk, room temperature

5 oz Gruyere Cheese, grated 2 cups

 

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Spinach Mac and Cheese

Recipe found on Martha Stewart’s website

3 TB unsalted Butter

1/2 cup minced Onion

1/3 cup All-purpose Flour

4 cups Whole Milk, room temperature

Coarse Salt and freshly ground black Pepper

About 1 3/4 lb Spinach, trimmed, washed and cut crosswise into 1/2” thick strips

5 oz Gruyere Cheese, grated 2 cups

3/4 lb Elbow Macaroni, cooked according to package instructions

In a large saucepan, melt butter over medium.  Add onion and cook until translucent, 6 minutes.  Whisk in flour and cook, stirring frequently, until mixture is pale golden and has a slightly nutty aroma, about 2 minutes.  Whisking constantly, add 2 cups milk.  Add remaining 2 cups milk, raise heat to medium-high, and whisk until smooth; season with salt and pepper.  Cook, whisking constantly until sauce comes to a boil, 8 to 10 minutes.  reduce heat to low and simmer gently, stirring occasionally, until sauce thickens, 13 to 15 minutes.  Add spin each and cook, stirring constantly, until wilted, about 3 minutes.  Add cheese and stir until melted, about 2 minutes.  Add cooked macaroni and stir to combine.  Serve immediately.

Miso-Butter Turnips and Greens

From The Vegetable Butcher by Cara Mangini

2 TB unsalted Butter

1 1/2 lab Turnips and Greens, greens separated, stemmed and cut into 1” pieces; roots cut into 3/4” wedges

1/4 tsp fine Sea Salt, plus extra as needed

2 TB Mirin

2 TB White Miso

Melt the butter in a deep saucepan over medium-high heat.  Add the tulips and the 1/4 tsp of salt, stir to coat, then cook, stirring occasionally until they begin to turn golden, about 3 minutes.  Add the mirin (it will foam) and cook for 1 minute more.  Reduce the heat to medium and add the greens.  As they begin to wilt, stir to incorporate them.  Cook, stirring, until wilted and tender, 1 minute.  Push the turnips and greens to the side of the pan to make room in the center.  Add the miso and 1/4 cup of water to the center of the pan, stir the miso, then stir this miso mixture into the turnip mixture to coat evenly.   Cook, stirring occasionally, til the turnip roots are tender, golden, and glazed, 3 minutes.  Season with more salt to taste.  Serve over rice if desired.

Swiss Chard or Collards Crostata with Fennel Seed Crust

From The Vegetable Butcher by Cara Mangini

As you are using fennel seeds in the crust, I would add some thinly sliced fennel to the sauce portion of this recipe.

3 TB. Extra Virgin Olive Oil

2 Onions, from this week’s share, finely chopped

4 to 5 Garlic cloves, minced

1 1/2 lb Swiss Chard and/or Collard Greens, stems cut into 1/4” dice to equal 1 cup, and leaves sliced into 1/4” ribbons (to equal 15 loosely packed cups)

1 tsp fine Sea Salt

1/2 tsp crushed Red Pepper flakes

2 tsp dried Italian Seasoning or us a few TB of fresh chopped Basil from this week’s share

2 pinches of ground Nutmeg

4 large Eggs

1/2 cup chopped Scallions, use the green tops from the onions in this week’s share

1 cup Ricotta Cheese 

1/2 cup freshly grated Parmesan Cheese

1 Fennel Seed Crust (Recipe on this page)

Heat the olive oil in a Dutch oven over medium heat.  Add the onion and cook until it just begins to soften, about 2 minutes.  Stir in the garlic and chard stems and cook until the stems begin to soften, about 5 minutes.  If you are using collards, first blanch the chopped greens (omit the stems) in boiling water until tender about 2 minutes.  Drain and rinse them.  Squeeze them gently to release excess water and proceed as you would with Swiss chard.   Add the chard leaves (in batches if needed to fit the pan), salt, red pepper flakes, Italian seasoning, and nutmeg.  If you are using fresh basil as your seasoning add that at the end when the cooking is done.  Cook until leaves have fully wilted and any liquid has cooked off, about 10 minutes more.  Turn off the heat and let cool.  Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 375 F.  On a piece of parchment, flatten the crostata dough and roll it from the center outward with a lightly floured rolling pin.  Turn the dough and parchment as you go to create a circular shape about 15” in diameter and a little less than 1/4” thick.  Don't bother trying to make a perfect circle, but do try to even out the thickness of the dough.  Transfer the parchment and dough to a rimless baking sheet (the dough can hang over the edges for now).  In a small bowl, lightly beat 1 of the eggs with 1 teaspoon of water to make an egg wash; set it aside.  In a large bowl, lightly beat together the remaining eggs, then stir in the chard mixture scallions, ricotta, and parmesan to combine.  Transfer the chard mixture to the dough, spreading it out evenly but leaving a border of about 1 1/2”. Trim any dough edges that seem too long or thick.  Gently fold the dough border up and over the filling, pleating it as you go.  Brush the dough lightly with the egg wash.  Bake the crostata until the crust is golden brown and the filling is firm in the center, 40 to 45 minutes.  Slide the crostata, still on the parchment, onto a wire rack to cool for at least 15 minutes before cutting and serving.  It can be served warm or at room temperature.

Fennel Seed Crust

Makes a 15” round of dough

2 tsp Fennel Seeds (optional, but strongly recommended)

2 cups All-Purpose Flour

1/2 tsp fine Sea Salt

1/2 cups freshly grated Parmesan Cheese

1/2 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Up to 1/2 cup plus 2 TB Ice Water

Toast the fennel seeds in a small skillet over medium heat, continuously stirring or shaking the pan, until the seeds are golden and fragrant, about 3 minutes.  Let cool.  In a food processor or large bowl, briefly pulse or stir together the fennel seeds, flour, salt and parmesan until just incorporated.  Add the olive oil and blend or stir to combine.  While the processor is running, or while stirring, pour in a 1/2 cup of the ice water (no ice), then add more as needed, 1 TB at a time, until the dough just begins to form a ball.  It should be wet and smooth, but should not stick to your fingers.  Knead the dough on a lightly floured board for about 30 seconds until it comes together fully.  If it pulls apart at all or is dry and tough, place it back in the food processor bowl, add up to 2 TB more water and blend or stir until it is just incorporated.  Flatten the ball of dough just slightly and wrap it in plastic; let is rest in the refrigerator for at least 30 minutes or up to 1 day in advance of assembling the crostata.

The One Crop We Never Harvest (Yet)

Many of you know, if you visit the farm during the summer months, there are probably Mulberries on the trees to enjoy. Its a sweet, amazingly juicy, slightly tart, yummy berry that actually grow on trees. Mulberries are also incredibly delicate; the moment they are picked juice is running down the arm. Its fragility makes it impossible to harvest for the CSA or the farmers market. So the only people who get to enjoy them are those of you who come to the farm. Just one more good reason to come visit some time this summer!

Keeping My Fingers Crossed

The biggest surprise on my morning walk last week was the row of cherry trees. I found lots of cherries, and so I had to eat lots of cherries. QA is an important job around here.  They are delicious. So, here's the thing with cherries, over the years we have lost almost all of the crop because of rain or hail at the wrong time.  The other big threat are our fine feathered friends. Birds love cherries as much as we do, and quite often they’ve come in and eaten just about every cherry on the trees before we’ve had a chance to get out there to harvest. So keep your fingers crossed we can get them before they do, and we can have cherries in the box maybe next week.

Basil Help

Last week I wrote about the wind blowing the basil covering off.  The thin covering helps protect the plants when they are young.  This is important because it means we can harvest basil a lot longer, getting more out of the planting, and so it adds tremendously to the value of the crop. The wind around here can be pretty brutal. At the end of the article, I asked if any of the members coming up for last Sunday’s Strawberry Day would be interested in helping me put the covers back up. I got great helping hands from the Albany site Hosts and the Cumberland hosts. I was very happy to get the torn covering clipped on to the hoops, but the greater joy came from having these longtime members and hosts playing in the basil field with me.

Sunday Supper At Marla

This coming Sunday is the dinner at Marla out in the Richmond.  We are very hopeful Nigel will be able to make it.  I know it would really perk up his spirits to have a chance to visit with members around a big dinner table.  Tickets can be purchased at marlabakery.com.

THIS WEEK'S BOX: MAY 15TH- 20TH

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Strawberries - Discard any bruised strawberries or freeze and use in smoothie. Do not rinse until ready to eat. Strawberries don’t like to be wet. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water. 

Turnips (or Radishes) - If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days.

*Spinach- Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

*Oregano- Place in a glass of water and cover with a plastic bag. Change water often. Will last up to 5 days.

Lettuce - Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*Green Onions- Place in a jar filled with an inch or two of water. Stand onions in the jar, cover the whole thing with a plastic bag, and keep it in the fridge. Stored this way, they stay crisp for about a week.

Green Garlic - It is such a delight to have this back in our harvest shares. My favorite way to enjoy is to stir fry the chopped garlic in a skillet with some olive oil. Then stir in eggs for a delicious green garlic scrambled eggs. Store in the crisper. Will last at least a week.

Fava Beans - Store favas in the refrigerator in a tightly sealed container. They'll last about a week.

*Red Kale - Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

Radishes (or Turnips)- Store radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator and they should keep for at least a week. If your radishes have leaves attached, it is best to remove them, as they tend to leach moisture from the root.

*Valencia Oranges - Valencia Oranges are available outside of the regular citrus season and are known for their high juice content. One of the best oranges for juicing. Don't be derred if you see a tinge of green on these oranges - it is caused by chlorphyll to help protect the oranges from sunburn. Green-tinged oranges are ripe and still taste sweet. Will last much longer in the fridge, up to two weeks.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Spinach Quiche

Moroccan Vegetable and Fava Bean Soup

Kale and Fennel Salad

Strawberry Brown Butter Bettys

 

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Spinach Quiche

1 TB Butter

4 large Eggs

1 1/4 cups Heavy Cream

Pinch ground Nutmeg

1/8 tsp Cayenne Pepper

1 cup grate Gruyere

Shopping list for: Moroccan Vegetable and Fava Bean Soup

2 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

2 Leeks, white and light green parts only, cleaned and sliced

1 large Onion, chopped

2 medium or large Carrots, peeled and diced

1 stalk Celery, chopped

1 small Potato, (about 4 oz), peeled and diced

2 quarts Water, Vegetable Stock or Chicken Stock

A Bouquet Garni made with a couple of sprigs of Parsley, 

A Bay Leaf

Several sprigs of Cilantro

1/2 tsp ground White Pepper

1/2 tsp Turmeric

Shopping list for: Kale and Fennel Salad

2 TB Olive Oil

1 TB Balsamic

1/4 cup slivered Almonds, toasted

3 TB dried Cherries

Shopping list for: Strawberry Brown Butter Betties

3/4 stick salted or unsalted butter

1 teaspoon granulated sugar

6 slices white sandwich bread, crusts removed

1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon lemon zest, finely grated

1/2 cup panko

Softly whipped cream, for serving

Shopping list for: All recipes

3/4 stick salted or unsalted butter; plus 1 TB Butter

1 teaspoon granulated sugar

6 slices white sandwich bread, crusts removed

1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar

1/2 teaspoon lemon zest, finely grated

1/2 cup panko

Softly whipped cream, for serving

2 TB Olive Oil

1 TB Balsamic

1/4 cup slivered Almonds, toasted

3 TB dried Cherries

2 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

2 Leeks, white and light green parts only, cleaned and sliced

1 large Onion, chopped

2 medium or large Carrots, peeled and diced

1 stalk Celery, chopped

1 small Potato, (about 4 oz), peeled and diced

2 quarts Water, Vegetable Stock or Chicken Stock

A Bouquet Garni made with a couple of sprigs of Parsley, 

A Bay Leaf

Several sprigs of Cilantro

1/2 tsp ground White Pepper

1/2 tsp Turmeric

4 large Eggs

1 1/4 cups Heavy Cream

Pinch ground Nutmeg

1/8 tsp Cayenne Pepper

1 cup grate Gruyere

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Kale and Fennel Salad

Recipe found on Cook For Your Life.org

1 Orange

2 TB Olive Oil

1 TB Balsamic

Salt and Pepper, to taste

1/4 cup slivered Almonds, toasted

3 TB dried Cherries

4 cups shredded Kale leaves

2 cups thinly sliced Fennel

Cut the top and bottom of the orange off. Set the orange on the cut side so it does not wobble. Using a sharp knife, rotate and cut around the shape of the orange to remove the pith and peel. Over a large salad bowl, using a pairing knife, cut along each side of the white piths so that each segment is cut out cleanly.  Let them drop into the salad bowl along with any juice that results. Add the olive oil and balsamic vinegar to the orange segments and juice. Gently whisk until combined. Add in the almonds and cherries plus salt and pepper to taste. Top with the shredded kale and sliced fennel.

Strawberry Brown Butter Bettys

Recipe found on SmittenKitchen.com, Recommended by CSA Member Paige K.

Serves 6 muffin-sized desserts

3/4 stick salted or unsalted butter

1 teaspoon granulated sugar

6 slices white sandwich bread, crusts removed

1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar**

1/2 teaspoon lemon zest, finely grated

1/8 teaspoon salt (omit if using salted butter)

1/2 cup panko

1 1/2 to 2 cups strawberries, stemmed and sliced (I forgot to jot down the weight, but it was less than a half pound of whole berries)

Softly whipped cream, for serving

Preheat oven to 350°F with rack in middle. In a small pot, melt butter over medium heat. Once melted, reduce heat to medium-low. The butter will melt, then foam, then turn clear golden and finally start to turn brown and smell nutty. Stir frequently, scraping up any bits from the bottom as you do. Don’t take your eyes off the pot as while you may be impatient for it to start browning, the period between the time the butter begins to take on color and the point where it burns is less than a minute. Remove from heat. Lightly butter muffin cups with some of brown butter, then sprinkle with granulated sugar. Roll bread slices with a rolling pin to flatten. Brush both sides with additional brown butter, then gently fit into muffin cups. Stir together brown sugar, zest, salt and panko, then add strawberries and toss to coat. Stir in remaining brown butter. Heap strawberry mixture into cups, pressing gently. Cover pan with foil and bake 15 minutes. Uncover and bake until strawberries are very tender, about 10 minutes more. Let stand 5 minutes before removing from pan. Serve warm or at room temperature. well.  Add the cheese, sprinkle with the parsley and serve.

Moroccan Vegetable and Fava Bean Soup

Recipe by NYT Martha Rose Shulman

2 cups fresh Fava Beans, double peeled

2 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

2 Leeks, white and light green parts only, cleaned and sliced

1 large Onion, chopped

2 medium or large Carrots, peeled and diced

1 stalk Celery, chopped

2 medium turnips, peeled and diced

1 small Potato, (about 4 oz), peeled and diced

2 quarts Water, Vegetable Stock or Chicken Stock

Salt to taste

A Bouquet Garni made with a couple of sprigs of Parsley, 

A Bay Leaf and several sprigs of Cilantro

1/2 tsp ground White Pepper

1/2 tsp Turmeric

Skin the fresh favas. Bring a medium pot of salted water to a boil. Fill a bowl with ice water. Drop the shelled fava beans into the boiling water and boil 5 minutes. Drain and transfer immediately to the cold water. Allow the beans to cool for several minutes, then slip off their skins by pinching off the eye of the skin and squeezing gently. Hold several beans in one hand and use your other thumb and forefinger to pinch off the eyes (have a bowl for the shelled favas close at hand and this will not take very long). Heat 1 TB of the olive oil over medium heat in the a large, heavy soup pot or Dutch oven and add the leeks, onion, carrots and celery. Cook, stirring, until vegetables are just tender, about 5 minutes, and add the turnips, potatoes, favas, water or stock, salt and bouquet garni. Bring to a boil, reduce the heat, cover and simmer for 45 minutes, or until the vegetables are very tender. Remove and discard the bouquet garni. Puree the soup using a hand blender, a food mill, or working in batches in a blender (make sure that you place a towel over the top of the blender and remove the inner part of the lid to avoid hot splashes).  Return to the pot, add the pepper, turmeric and chopped cilantro and bring to a simmer over medium-low heat. Turn the heat to low, cover and simmer, stirring often for 30 minutes. Taste and adjust salt and pepper. Serve in wide soup bowls, garnished with cilantro leaves and with a drizzle of olive oil over each serving.

Spinach Quiche

Recipe by Jennifer Segal

Serves 4 to 6

9" deep dish Pastry Dough 

1 TB Butter

1/2 cup thinly sliced Shallots, I would use the Green Onions

4 large Eggs

1 1/4 cups Heavy Cream

Pinch ground Nutmeg

3/4 tsp Salt

1/8 tsp Cayenne Pepper

1 cup grate Gruyere

12 oz fresh Spinach

Preheat oven to 400 F.  Remove pie crust from freezer and thaw until just soft enough to easily prick with a fork, about 10 minutes.  If you are using an Eatwell Heirloom Pastry Dough, it is best to thaw in the refrigerator overnight, or take it out early in the morning before you leave for work (also in the refrigerator).  It should be ready for you by evening.  Roll out and put in a 9" deep dish pie plate. Prick bottom and sides all over with a fork.  Bake on center rack until fully cooked and lightly golden, between 10-15 minutes depending on the brand. Keep an eye on it, if it puffs up while cooking, gently prick it with a fork so it deflates.  Set aside and turn oven down to 325 F.  Heat butter in a small saute pan over medium-low heat. Cook shallots until soft and translucent, about 8 minutes. Do not brown. Set aside to cool. In a medium bowl, whisk together eggs, heavy cream, nutmeg, salt and cayenne pepper. Place cooked pie shell on a baking sheet. This makes it easy to move in and out of oven. Spread shallots over bottom of cooked crust, then sprinkle grate Gruyere over top. Scatter spinach evenly over cheese, breaking up clumps as best you can, then pour egg mixture over top. Bake at 325 F for 50 to 55 minutes until custard is set and top is lightly golden.  Serve hot or warm.

 

Nigel

I haven't written a Nigel update for a while now.   I felt like I wanted to take some time to write something really thoughtful, but find that as I live through all of this, it is impossible to get my head in the right space.  So here is an update, maybe not as thoughtful as I had hoped.

Late last year, they put Nigel on the last available treatment for his cancer.  It is a new drug therapy that works with the body's immune system; similar to the drug he had tried, which didn't work.  Nigel went through two rounds of chemo at UCSF back in October and November to get his cancer load low enough to start the new drug.  We found out in January, this newest drug was not working.  

Currently, there are no more drug options for us.  The chemo works, but it is a temporary fix.  On the horizon is a new therapy "Car T Cell".  UCSF hopes to have trials by November or December, so our only option is to keep Nigel alive long enough to get him into the trial. Thank all the powers that be, he is finally eating, and eating like crazy!  It had been almost a year of basically raw milk and yogurt as his main diet.  I can tell you his strength is greatly improved with the additional food.  I am trying to support his health with herbs, diet and exercise.

For now our routine is chemo at UCSF every 4 weeks for about a week stay.  When he is back home we have to make trips down for labs and transfusions at least 3 times a week.  For about two weeks his immune system is either going down to 0 or is going to be working its way back up from 0.  You can imagine our schedule is really crazy here.  BUT his spirits are amazing and he has been working on upgrading all of the computers, and we are brainstorming on how to make the farm more efficient.  I picked him up yesterday and I can tell you right now he is walking laps around the kitchen.

While he was in UCSF last week, friends brought meals to him.  I think having really good food made a big difference, he is much stronger than he has been in the past.  Also, one of our long time members, Heidi, is a physical therapist at UCSF and she gives Nigel very extra special attention.  She came up with a new routine for him, which seems to have catapulted him into a very positive direction!  So tough times around here, but we keep fighting the fight and moving forward.  

 

Basil

Several weeks ago the crew went out to the basil beds to get the young plants covered.  The covering protects them from the harsh summer sun and provides us with a longer harvest.  Many of you have been here when the winds blow and so you know how incredibly powerful it can be here.  Over the past couple of weeks we have had some crazy winds which did a number on the basil covers.  It always makes me sad to see the crew's hard work destroyed by the wind.  It is particularly hard, as I know we are very shorthanded and they certainly don't have the time to go back out there to put the cover back over the hoops.  Maybe if any of you coming up this weekend are interested, we could get a little crew together and take care of that?  If you are interested can you text me 530-554-3971 or let Connie know on Sunday.  I bet with a few of us we could get it taken care of right quick.

 

 

This Week's Box: May 8th - 13th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Strawberries - Discard any bruised strawberries or freeze and use in smoothie. Do not rinse until ready to eat. Strawberries don’t like to be wet. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Turnips - If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days.

*Basil - Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week.

*Stir Fry Mix - These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

Lettuce - Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

Chives - Wrap in a damp paper towel and store in a plastic bag in the fridge. Keeps about 1 week.

*Green Garlic - It is such a delight to have this back in our harvest shares. My favorite way to enjoy is to stir fry the chopped garlic in a skillet with some olive oil. Then stir in eggs for a delicious green garlic scrambled eggs. Store in the crisper. Will last at least a week.

Fava Beans - Store favas in the refrigerator in a tightly sealed container. They'll last about a week.

*Red Kale - Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

Radishes - Store radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator and they should keep for at least a week. If your radishes have leaves attached, it is best to remove them, as they tend to leach moisture from the root.

Valencia Oranges - Valencia Oranges are available outside of the regular citrus season and are known for their high juice content. One of the best oranges for juicing. Don't be derred if you see a tinge of green on these oranges - it is caused by chlorphyll to help protect the oranges from sunburn. Green-tinged oranges are ripe and still taste sweet. Will last much longer in the fridge, up to two weeks.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Lettuce and Green Garlic Soup

Spring Greens Lasagne

Fava Bean Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette and Shaved Manchego

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Lettuce and Green Garlic Soup

1 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 medium Onion, chopped

1/2 cup Rice

7 cups Chicken or Vegetable Stock

1/2 cup Parsley leaves

A bouquet garni made with Bay Leaf a few sprigs each Parsley and Thyme, tied together

2 TB chopped Parsley or Chives for garnish

Freshly grated Parmesan

Shopping list for: Spring Greens Lasagne

2 TB Olive Oil

1 medium White Onion, medium dice

3 medium Garlic cloves, finely chopped

2 cups Heavy Cream

1 1/2 cups Creme Fraiche

1 9 oz box No Boil Lasagna Noodles

1 lb fresh Ricotta

2 cups finely grated Parmesan cheese

Shopping list for: Fava Bean Salad with Lemon Vinaigrette and Shaved Manchego

1/4 cup fresh Lemon Juice

1/4 cup Olive Oil

1/4 lb Manchego Cheese, shaved thinly (or Asiago or Romano)

2 TB finely chopped Parsley, you could substitute some basil or chives

Shopping list for all recipes:

3 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

2 medium Onion

1/2 cup Rice

7 cups Chicken or Vegetable Stock

1/2 cup Parsley leaves; plus 2 TB chopped Parsley or Chives for garnish; plus 2 TB finely chopped Parsley, you could substitute some basil or chives

A bouquet garni made with Bay Leaf a few sprigs each Parsley and Thyme, tied together

Freshly grated Parmesan; plus 2 cups finely grated Parmesan cheese

3 medium Garlic cloves, finely chopped

2 cups Heavy Cream

1 1/2 cups Creme Fraiche

1 9 oz box No Boil Lasagna Noodles

1 lb fresh Ricotta

1/4 cup fresh Lemon Juice

1/4 cup Olive Oil

1/4 lb Manchego Cheese, shaved thinly (or Asiago or Romano)

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Search