This Week's Box: January 16th - 21st

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

Spinach - Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

Mizuna - Mizuna will keep in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. Rinse and dry the leaves before refrigerating. Wrap them in a paper towel and store them in a plastic bag.

Turnips - If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days.

Naval Oranges - These juicy, freshly picked oranges can be left out on the counter for a few days, but last up to two weeks if refrigerated.

Dill - A delicious mediterranean herb that is well suited to our climate. Store in the fridge. Should last up to 7 days.

Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

Red Kale - These luscious green leaves are a great source of beta carotene, vitamin C, and calcium.  The colder it gets, the more frost we have, the darker the color in the leaves, and the sweeter they become. Store in fridge and wash well. Should last about a week.

Cauliflower (or Romanesco) - Will last a while in a closed container in the fridge but some say it has the best flavor the day it's brought home. Lasts 1-2 weeks.

Romanesco (or Cauliflower) - Will last up to one week in a closed container in the fridge, but has better flavor if consumed earlier. Rinse before preparing.

Cabbage - Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week.

Leeks - These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

Pomelo - Pomelos are the largest citrus fruit. Pomelos can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks or refrigerated for up to several weeks. Keep away from direct sunlight and heat.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Kimchi

Kimchi Fried Rice

Leeks Vinaigrette

Cauliflower Kuku

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Kimchi

7 tablespoons salt

4 scallions, including tops

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoons Sriracha (or substitute another garlic chili sauce)

1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

1 teaspoon sugar

1 cup sliced or grated apple (any kind will do)

Shopping list for: Kimchi Fried Rice

3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided

4 cups kimchi, chopped

1 tablespoon butter

1 tablespoon red pepper paste (gochujang)

4 cups cool cooked white rice, preferably a day old

1 tablespoon sesame oil

4 eggs

sesame seasoned seaweed, crushed

4 scallions, green parts only, chopped

Shopping list for: Leeks Vinaigrette

5 tbsp. red wine vinegar

2 tsp. Dijon mustard

Freshly ground white pepper, to taste

7 tbsp. vegetable oil

8 sprigs parsley

1 hard-boiled egg, chopped

Shopping list for: Cauliflower Kuku

¼ – ½ c. olive oil

1 medium onion, peeled & thinly sliced

2 cloves garlic, peeled & finely chopped

1 t. ground cumin

¼ t. turmeric

¼ t. cayenne

½ c. chopped parsley

4 eggs

½ t. baking powder

1 T. rice flour, potato starch, arrowroot, or cornstarch

½ c crumbled cheese

Shopping list for all recipes:

7 tablespoons salt

8 scallions

5 cloves garlic

1 tablespoons Sriracha (or substitute another garlic chili sauce)

1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

1 teaspoon sugar

1 cup sliced or grated apple (any kind will do)

3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided

4 cups kimchi, chopped (or use recipe included)

1 tablespoon butter

1 tablespoon red pepper paste (gochujang)

4 cups cool cooked white rice, preferably a day old

1 tablespoon sesame oil

8 eggs; plus 1 hard-boiled egg

sesame seasoned seaweed, crushed

5 tbsp. red wine vinegar

2 tsp. Dijon mustard

Freshly ground white pepper, to taste

7 tbsp. vegetable oil

8 sprigs parsley; plus 1/2 cup

¼ – ½ c. olive oil

1 medium onion, peeled & thinly sliced

1 t. ground cumin

¼ t. turmeric

¼ t. cayenne

½ t. baking powder

1 T. rice flour, potato starch, arrowroot, or cornstarch

½ c crumbled cheese

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Cauliflower Kuku

by Najmieh Batmanglij 

Recommended by CSA member Pat K.

¼ – ½ c. olive oil

1 medium onion, peeled & thinly sliced

2 cloves garlic, peeled & finely chopped

1 small head cauliflower (or romanesco), cut up into florets & coarsely chopped

1 t. salt

pepper

1 t. ground cumin

¼ t. turmeric

¼ t. cayenne

½ c. chopped parsley

4 eggs

½ t. baking powder

1 T. rice flour, potato starch, arrowroot, or cornstarch

½ c crumbled cheese

Preheat over to 400 degrees. Heat ¼ c. oil in a medium-sized cast-iron skillet over medium heat. Add the onion, garlic, cauliflower, salt, spices, and parsley.

Stir-fry for 5-10 minutes until cauliflower is soft. Meanwhile break eggs into a mixing bowl, add the remaining ingredients and whisk lightly. 

Pour this mixture into the skillet and give it a quick stir, reduce heat to low, flatten the surface and pour 2 or 3 T. of remaining oil around the edges. Transfer the skillet to the preheated oven and bake 8 - 10 minutes or until the edges are lightly browned and pulling away from the skillet. Remove from the oven, cut into wedges. Can be served with yogurt and fresh herbs.

Leeks Vinaigrette

This is a classic French preparation, and really lets leeks (also in your box this week) shine on their own. Braised stovetop and then combined with a basic vinaigrette, they work well as a side, a vegetarian main, or on top of your favorite toast. 

Saveur Magazine

8 medium leeks, trimmed of tough green parts

Kosher salt, to taste

5 tbsp. red wine vinegar

2 tsp. Dijon mustard

Freshly ground white pepper, to taste

7 tbsp. vegetable oil

8 sprigs parsley

1 hard-boiled egg, chopped

Starting about 1" above root end, slice leeks lengthwise, but not all the way through. Open leeks like a book and wash well in cold running water to remove all sand and dirt. 

Bring a deep-sided skillet of salted water to a boil, add leeks, and cook over medium heat until soft but not mushy, about 6 minutes. Transfer leeks to a large bowl of ice water to stop them from cooking further. 

Carefully split leeks completely in half lengthwise, and transfer to a rack, cut side down, to drain thoroughly.

Whisk vinegar, mustard, and salt and pepper together in a small bowl. Gradually add oil, whisking constantly, until vinaigrette is smooth and creamy. Adjust seasonings and set aside. Remove leaves from 4 of the parsley sprigs, chop leaves, and set aside.

Divide leek halves equally among 4 warm plates. Drizzle vinaigrette over leeks, and sprinkle with chopped parsley and egg. Garnish each plate with a bit of parsley.

Kimchi Fried Rice

Serious Eats

3 tablespoons vegetable oil, divided

4 cups kimchi, chopped

1 tablespoon butter

1 tablespoon red pepper paste (gochujang)

4 cups cool cooked white rice, preferably a day old

1 tablespoon sesame oil

4 eggs

sesame seasoned seaweed, crushed

4 scallions, green parts only, chopped

black pepper

Pour two tablespoons of the oil into a large skillet or wok and turn the heat to medium. When oil starts to shimmer, add the kimchi. Cook, stirring occasionally, until the kimchi is heated through, about two minutes. Add the butter and the red pepper paste. Stir well until both are incorporated.

Add the rice, breaking up any clumps with a wooden spoon. Stir until it is evenly mixed in with the kimchi. Pour the sesame oil on top of this mixture. Spread the rice and kimchi out as much as possible in an even layer, and let cook for a few minutes until it gets a little crispy on the bottom. Turn off the heat, and divide the mixture between four bowls.

Pour the remaining one tablespoon of oil into a non-stick skillet set over medium-high heat. When shimmering, crack in the eggs, cover the skillet, and cook until the whites have set. When each is done, use a spatula and set one egg on top of each bowl of rice. Garnish with the crushed seaweed, scallions, and black pepper. Serve immediately.

 

Kimchi

We’ve achieved that time of year where I’m starting to think that I’ll freak out if I see one more recipe for potato leek soup or roasted butternut squash. Now, these things are fantastic but (probably) like you, I’m reaching my limit and I’m looking for something new to do with these gorgeous vegetables. 

Lucky for us, I’ve got a few things up my sleeve. First up is one of my favorite condiments/ingredients. Kimchee is a spicy fermented vegetable that you can make year round, and it works well with a wide range of ingredients! Start with this cabbage and apple version (Cabbage is in your box this week), and feel free to toss in some carrot, radish, cucumber, or sub in pear for the apple! Once your kimchi is done, you can use it to compliment a Korean BBQ or make one of my favorite winter dishes: Kimchi fried rice!

Serious Eats

Ingredients for Day 1

1 large head cabbage

6 tablespoons salt

Ingredients for Day 2

4 scallions, including tops

3 cloves garlic, minced

1 tablespoons Sriracha (or substitute another garlic chili sauce)

1 teaspoon grated fresh ginger

1 teaspoon sugar

1 cup sliced or grated apple (any kind will do)

1 tablespoon salt

Cut cabbage into 1-inch square pieces, or a large shred like thick coleslaw (I find this cut makes it easier and more versatile once it's done). Place in a bowl, and sprinkle with salt. Add water to cover, and mix well. Cover the bowl with plastic wrap, and let stand in a cool place overnight.

The next day, drain the cabbage and rinse quickly under cold running water. Cut the scallions into 1-inch lengths, then cut lengthwise into thin slices. In a bowl, combine the scallions with the rinsed cabbage, garlic, chili sauce, ginger, sugar, apples, salt and enough water to cover. Mix well, and place in a quart jar with a lid. 

Close the jar, and let stand for a few days in a cool place.

Taste mixture every day, and when it has a good balance of flavor and acidity, place in the refrigerator (four to five days usually). The kimchee will keep for two weeks.

Strawberries and Chickens

The strawberry plants are dormant right now, taking a break for the winter and getting ready for the spring. This is last years crop, which we will harvest again this spring and then plant a new crop to replace it on another part of the farm. Last year, we put the chickens on some old strawberry beds to scratch away the leaf debris, so that we could remove the woven plastic mulch. As we moved them down the field, where they had been the week previously, the strawberry crowns regrew. So I am thinking that I will try that for a very short period of time on this years crop. It will make the berries easier to pick and increase airflow around the plants reducing the risk of disease. My concern is that if it rains heavily, we will not be able to move the chicken houses and the chickens could cause damage to the plants and the future crop. Farming is a gamble, I have no need to go to Vegas, I gamble every day on the farm... Nigel

Winter Rains

Our crews work year round, through the heat of the summer as well as through the rains and winds that we are currently receiving, as this atmospheric river passes through the Central Valley. We are grateful for the rain, desperately needed to replenish ground water and refill reservoirs throughout the region, but it does create a very challenging working environment. Just wanted to say how much we appreciate the crews picking, washing, packing, selling and delivering the produce throughout the year and thank you for supporting us.

 

Paddington Bear Loves These

Not quite true, but he does love the marmalade that you can make with them. You can add myself and quite a few members of he farm to the marmalade lovers list, too. The Seville orange fruit is ripening nicely and we will be harvesting it very soon. Seville oranges are bitter and can be used in many ways apart marmalade, such as Cocktails, for baking and in Indian dishes.

How all this works is, once we have harvested the crop, we will weigh it and then offer it to you, the farm members, first. Please watch your Friday afternoon email for details. Any unclaimed oranges by members will be gobbled up by our Ferry Plaza Farmers   Market customers.

Ye olde Coppicing

The poplar trees that divide our fields and provide wind protection, in addition to other benefits, have to be cut down. If not, they die off. These fast growing trees have a short life. By cutting them close to the ground, we create a stump or stool. They regrow up to 20 new shoots the following year. The tree line pictured above was cut last spring and are already over ten feet tall. Our job this winter is to thin out the shoots to just three of the best. In another eight years, these shoots will be eight inches in diameter. They are then perfect for mushroom production or timber. Anything not the right size is shredded for mulch or firewood. Now we need the right person to come along and create a great mushroom business on the farm.

This Week's Box: January 9th - 14th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

Fennel - If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.

Spinach - Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

Mizuna (or Arugula) - Mizuna will keep in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. Rinse and dry the leaves before refrigerating. Wrap them in a paper towel and store them in a plastic bag.

Arugula (or Mizuna) - Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

Turnips - If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days.

Dill - A delicious mediterranean herb that is well suited to our climate. Store in the fridge. Should last up to 7 days.

Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

Cauliflower (or Romanesco) - Will last a while in a closed container in the fridge but some say it has the best flavor the day it's brought home. Lasts 1-2 weeks.

Romanesco (or Cauliflower) - Will last up to one week in a closed container in the fridge, but has better flavor if consumed earlier. Rinse before preparing.

Red Cabbage - Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week.

Leeks - These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

Watermelon Daikon - Cut the top off the Daikon to help keep moisture in the roots, store in a closed container in the fridge and they should last for up to two weeks if not more. A wet paper towel can also be placed in the container to help maintain humidity and keep the roots from wilting.

Grapefruit or Pomelo - Grapefruits and Pomelos can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks or refrigerated for up to several weeks. Keep away from direct sunlight and heat.

Apples (Hidden Star Orchards) - Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months. 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Sautéed Fennel, Leek and Mushrooms

Fennel, Apple, & Dill Salad

Pan Sautéed Red Cabbage

Roasted Cauliflower

Sautéed Baby Bok Choy

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Sautéed Fennel, Leek and Mushrooms

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 tablespoons dry white wine or water

6 to 8 ounces cremini or baby bella mushrooms, sliced

¼ cup minced fresh parsley

¼ cup crushed walnuts or almonds

Shopping list for: Fennel, Apple, & Dill Salad

1 shallot, thinly sliced

1 rib celery, thinly sliced

tablespoons lemon juice

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

Shopping list for: Pan Sautéed Red Cabbage

Olive Oil

Pinch Sugar

Shopping list for: Roasted Cauliflower

Olive Oil

Pomegranate balsamic vinaigrette

Shopping list for: Sautéed Baby Bok Choy

2 TB Canola or Sunflower oil

2 cloves Garlic, peeled and mince

1 1/2" piece Ginger Root, peeled and minced

1/4 tsp Red Pepper Flakes, or to taste

1 TB Soy Sauce

1 TB chicken Stock or Water

Toasted Sesame Oil for drizzling

Shopping list for all recipes:

3 tablespoon olive oil; plus more for sautéing and roasted your veggies

2 tablespoons dry white wine or water

6 to 8 ounces cremini or baby bella mushrooms, sliced

¼ cup minced fresh parsley

¼ cup crushed walnuts or almonds

1 shallot, thinly sliced

1 rib celery, thinly sliced

3 tablespoons lemon juice

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

Pinch Sugar

Pomegranate balsamic vinaigrette

2 TB Canola or Sunflower oil

2 cloves Garlic, peeled and mince

1 1/2" piece Ginger Root, peeled and minced

1/4 tsp Red Pepper Flakes, or to taste

TB Soy Sauce

1 TB chicken Stock or Water

Toasted Sesame Oil for drizzling

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Sautéed Baby Bok Choy

Recipe from NYT by Sam Sifton

2 TB Canola or Sunflower oil

2 cloves Garlic, peeled and mince

1 1/2" piece Ginger Root, peeled and minced

1/4 tsp Red Pepper Flakes, or to taste

Approximately 1 1/2 lbs cleaned Bok Choy, ends trimmed

1 TB Soy Sauce

1 TB chicken Stock or Water

Toasted Sesame Oil for drizzling

In a large sauté pan with a lid, heat oil over medium-high heat until it starts to shimmer. Add garlic, ginger and red-pepper flakes and cook, stirring constantly, until fragrant, about 45 seconds.

Add bok choy and stir carefully to cover with oil, then cook for approximately 2 minutes. Add soy sauce, stock or water, then cover pan and cook for approximately 2 minutes more, until steam begins to escape from beneath the lid of the pan.

Uncover and continue to cook until liquid is close to evaporated and stalks are soft to the touch, approximately 3 minutes more.

Roasted Cauliflower

Recipe by Andre

 

Cauliflower or Romanesco

Olive Oil

Salt and Pepper

Pomegranate balsamic vinaigrette

Preheat oven to 400 F.  Slice the cauliflower, or Romanesco if that is what you have, into thick slices, about 2", so it looks almost like a slice of bread.  Coat extremely well with olive oil, salt and pepper to taste.  

Put onto a baking sheet, but if you have a cooling rack that fits on your baking sheet use that and put the slices directly onto that. It will cook more evenly on both sides.  If you don't have a rack to use, then flip everything over half way through the cooking time.  

Roast for 20 to 25 minutes.  You should see some nice dark brown caramelly edges.  Serve with a slightly sweet vinaigrette, Andre made one using a balsamic vinegar flavored with pomegranate, but I think a citrus would work well too.

 

Pan Sautéed Red Cabbage

My "adopted" daughter Kalina is visiting from New York with her boyfriend Andre.  Andre works the fish station at Perry Street a restaurant in NYC.  Yesterday he and Kalina walked and picked the farm, and last night we enjoyed his farm creations.  Our fabulous meal included a butternut squash soup, made with coconut milk and spices, roasted cauliflower, roasted leeks, and sauteed radicchio.  The meal was amazing and I could have eaten an entire cauliflower on my own!  I think sauteeing the red cabbage in the same method would be a fantastic replacement for the radicchio.  I too have been roasting many vegetables lately, from the obvious butternuts, to fennel, green cabbage, celeriac, and turnips!  If you already have the oven on you might as well throw in a few things to roast, like fennel and leeks, to have for the week.  They are so delicious added to soups or stews or as a side little bit of extra veg.

Recipe by Andre

Olive Oil

Salt and Pepper

Pinch Sugar

Juice from 1/2 Grapefruit or Pomelo

Cut the cabbage in half and remove the core.  Slice the cabbage into thin strips.  Put into a bowl and pour on enough olive oil to coat, a good sprinkling of salt and pepper, mix well in the bowl.  

Heat a large pan over medium heat and add the cabbage.  When the cabbage is well wilted add a pinch of sugar and juice from 1/2 grapefruit or pomelo.  Cook until the cabbage is to your preferred level of doneness.

 

Fennel, Apple, & Dill Salad

fromthelittleyellowkitchen.com

1 small fennel bulb, thinly sliced

1 shallot, thinly sliced

1 rib celery, thinly sliced

1/2 apple, thinly sliced

1/4 cup dill, chopped (reserve sprigs for garnish)

3-4 cups mixed greens, use that Arugula or Mizuna

3 tablespoons lemon juice

2 tablespoons olive oil

1 teaspoon Dijon mustard

1/4 teaspoon salt

Using a mandoline or sharp knife, thinly slice fennel, shallot, celery and apple. Toss mixed greens with dill and top with the sliced celery and fennel. Whisk together or use an immersion blender to combine lemon juice, olive oil, Dijon, and salt then add sliced shallots. Let sit 10-15 minutes.

Drizzle dressing with shallots over the salad and toss to combine. Plate salad and place 5-6 apple slices on top. Garnish with sprigs of dill.

Sautéed Fennel, Leek and Mushrooms

vegkitchen.com

Though anise-flavored fennel is a great veggie, most of us don’t think to use it for everyday meals. Sautéed with leeks and mushrooms, it makes a simple side dish. I also just heard it can be a great substitute for celery in your recipes.

1 tablespoon olive oil

2 tablespoons dry white wine or water

2 large leeks, white and palest green parts only, chopped and rinsed well

1 large fennel bulb (stalks trimmed away; see note), quartered and sliced

6 to 8 ounces cremini or baby bella mushrooms, sliced

¼ cup minced fresh parsley

¼ cup crushed walnuts or almonds

Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste

Heat the oil and wine in a large skillet. Add the leeks, fennel, and mushrooms, and sauté over medium heat, stirring frequently, until the leeks are wilted and the fennel tender-crisp, 10 to 15 minutes. Add tiny amounts of water if needed to keep the skillet moist. When the vegetables are done to your liking, stir in the parsley and nuts. Season with salt and pepper, then serve at once.

This would be good over rice or another grain of your choice.

 

Celeriac

Oh the ugly root - Celeriac, but how delicious!  I have found I really enjoy roasting chunks of celeriac with butternut and leeks with a little rosemary salt and olive oil.  I like to have a container of this mix in the fridge to add to soup, or beans, or as a little bit of a side dish, or recently I have been making pilaf and enjoying it with steamed greens and the butternut/celeriac/leek blend.  Very yummy!  I find the celeriac out in the field is really quite the site, the ugly root bulbs popping up out of the ground with the skinny celery like tops, so vibrantly green.  We always take the tops off, but I personally would prefer to keep them on, that way you have two products in one.  What do you think?

 

Bulgarian Leeks

We are always experimenting with new varieties. This leek was grown here last year. We like the nice long white stem. The varieties we grow have flavor, but so many people discard the green parts. We have been looking for one that has a longer white stem.  Some of you have the long stemmed Bulgarian leeks in your harvest share today. The seed was bought from rareseeds.com who have the seed bank store in Petaluma. This year, we decided to grow only this variety. 

One way we keep our seed planting record is in photo form. This bag is going to Headstart nursery in Gilroy. I am requesting 12,000 plants on weeks 30, 34 and 36. We ask them to sow three seeds in each cell of which two or three will germinate. This is called a multi sown cell and in our fertile soil this means we can almost double the amount of leeks for the same cost of plants. 

If you have any questions about how we grow crops let me know.

 

Daisy the Alpha Chicken

Last week the crew came into work while it was dry enough to move the chicken houses and fencing. Already you can see that they have mown down all the grass around them. This is partly what makes the yolks orange. Keeping the houses moving onto fresh pasture spreads out their manure and makes sure that every part of the field has the bug clearing benefit of the girls, too. They will be moved to the end of the field, then come back, right in front of where we took this photo.

This pasture was sown in May last year in not ideal conditions. It was too hot. We planted twenty acres of pasture in November, which are all germinating nicely. 

IMG_6843.jpg

Daisy is from a line of dogs bred specifically as livestock guardian dogs. She was trained by us specifically to protect the chickens. We get coyotes on the farm almost every night and the occasional stray dog. We firmly believe that as we use these farm animals to produce eggs and meat for us we have to protect them as best we can with the fence and Daisy.

February Spinach

While walking the farm, I like to see great crops to harvest for your weekly share. What really makes me happy, is seeing crops growing nicely for harvest later. My job is to make sure enough is planted and growing well for next season. This is spinach which was planted in mid November. I can see that Ramon has managed tocultivate with the brush hoe at least once to keep down the weeds.

There are twelve rows on each bed. The tractor wheels stay in the same position to minimize soil compaction.

This Week's Box: January 2nd - 7th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

Mandarins (Bill Crepps - Not Certified Organic) - Some of these delicious little cuties are from our friend Bill Crepps at Everything Under the Sun in Winters. His fruit is no longer certified organic because of the paperwork load and expense. These make a great afternoon snack or a great addition to a salad. They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Spinach - Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

Parsley - Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

Celery -  This is not an easy crop to grow. It requires constant water and fertility. We supply the water but the soil microfauna seems to have been able to keep up releasing nutrients as demanded by the crop. This is not an easy task. Store in your crisper. Should last up to a week.

Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

Cauliflower (or Romanesco) - Will last a while in a closed container in the fridge but some say it has the best flavor the day it's brought home. Lasts 1-2 weeks.

Romanesco (or Cauliflower) - Will last up to one week in a closed container in the fridge, but has better flavor if consumed earlier. Rinse before preparing.

Cabbage - Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week.

Leeks - These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

Daikon - Cut the top off the Daikon to help keep moisture in the roots, store in a closed container in the fridge and they should last for up to two weeks if not more. A wet paper towel can also be placed in the container to help maintain humidity and keep the roots from wilting.

Grapefruit - Grapefruits can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks or refrigerated for up to several weeks. Keep away from direct sunlight and heat.

Apples (Hidden Star Orchards) - Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months. 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Paul Bertolli's Cauliflower Soup

Refrigerator Pickles

Leek Bread Pudding

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Paul Bertolli's Cauliflower Soup

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 medium onion, sliced thin

Extra virgin olive oil, to taste

Shopping list for: Refrigerator Pickles

2 firm seedless cucumbers (or radishes, turnips, grapes, apples, etc.)

1 tablespoon sugar/honey/brown sugar/molasses

1 tsp chili flake (if desired)

1 tsp coriander seeds (if desired)

1 tsp cumin seeds (if desired)

2 tbsp chopped fresh dill 

1 - 2 cups white vinegar (or rice wine, or cider vinegar)

Shopping list for: Leek Bread Pudding

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

6 cups 1-inch-cubed bread (any kind really)

2 teaspoons finely chopped chives

1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves (or oregano, or marjoram)

2 eggs

3 cups whole milk, heavy cream or half-and-half or a combination thereof

1/2 cup shredded Gruyere or Swiss Cheese

Shopping list for all recipes:

3 tablespoons olive oil

1 medium onion, sliced thin

Extra virgin olive oil, to taste

2 firm seedless cucumbers (or radishes, turnips, grapes, apples, etc.)

1 tablespoon sugar/honey/brown sugar/molasses

1 tsp chili flake (if desired)

1 tsp coriander seeds (if desired)

1 tsp cumin seeds (if desired)

2 tbsp chopped fresh dill 

1 - 2 cups white vinegar (or rice wine, or cider vinegar)

2 tablespoons unsalted butter

cups 1-inch-cubed bread (any kind really)

2 teaspoons finely chopped chives

1/2 teaspoons fresh thyme leaves (or oregano, or marjoram)

2 eggs

3 cups whole milk, heavy cream or half-and-half or a combination thereof

1/2 cup shredded Gruyere or Swiss Cheese

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