This Week's Box: March 27th - April 1st

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Mandarins - They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Chard (or Dandelion Greens) - Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Spinach - Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

Parsley - Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

Red Kale - Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

*Dandelion Greens (or Chard) - Rinse well, wrap in a damp paper towel and place in a plastic bag and refrigerate. If the towel is kept moist, greens can last up to one week.

*Chives - Wrap in a damp paper towel and store in a plastic bag in the fridge. Keeps about 1 week.

*Green Garlic - It is such a delight to have this back in our harvest shares. My favorite way to enjoy is to stir fry the chopped garlic in a skillet with some olive oil. Then stir in eggs for a delicious green garlic scrambled eggs. Store in the crisper. Will last at least a week.

*Carrots (Terra Firma Farm) - These come from Terra Firma Farm in Winters. We grow amazing tasting carrots here on our farm but the germination is sporadic because our soil is a little too heavy. I covet the field next to us as it has a nice sandy area. Forgive me. Store in the crisper wrapped to prevent drying out. Should last at least 7 days.

Spring Onions - Spring onions are onions harvested at the immature stage, when they have just begun to form their bulb and are still green on top. Their flavor is a little milder since they haven't yet fully developed. Spring onions should be kept in a closed container, to prevent drying out, in the refrigerator and should last a couple of weeks.

Beets - Cut the tops off to keep beets firm (be sure to keep the greens!) by leaving any top on the root vegetables draws moisture from the root, making the lose flavor and firmness. Beets should be washed and kept in an open container with a wet towel on top. Keeps for several weeks.

Raisins (Capay Canyon Ranch) - Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Nigel's First Big Meal - Steak, Mashed Potatoes and a Big Salad

Rice and Veg

Re-Purposing Dishes

Poached Tangerine Slices

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Nigel's First Big Meal - Steak, Mashed Potatoes and a Big Salad

Sprinkling of Olive Oil; plus a drizzle

Orange, fresh juice and zest

1 tsp of grainy mustard

1 to 2 TB of yogurt

A few raisins, nuts, feta or blue cheese (optional)

Potatoes (amount depends on the number of people)

Shopping list for: Rice and Veg

3 TB Butter or Oil

2 cups Brown Basmatti Rice

4 cups Vegetable or Eatwell Farm Chicken Stock

Shopping list for: Re-Purposing Dishes

Eggs (1 for the patty, plus any additional for sides, and to add to your rice)

A little bit of All Purpose Flour

Some Bread Crumbs

Bacon (optional, but can use the bacon fat for frying)

A little oil or butter

Sour Cream,Tabasco, Soy Sauce (optional)

Shopping list for: Poached Tangerine Slices

1½ c. sugar

¼ c. dry white wine

¼ c. fresh lemon juice

Shopping list for all recipes:

Sprinkling of Olive Oil; plus a drizzle

Orange, fresh juice and zest

1 tsp of grainy mustard

1 to 2 TB of yogurt

A few raisins, nuts, feta or blue cheese (optional)

Potatoes (amount depends on the number of people)

3 TB Butter or Oil

2 cups Brown Basmatti Rice

4 cups Vegetable or Eatwell Farm Chicken Stock

Eggs (1 for the patty, plus any additional for sides, and to add to your rice)

A little bit of All Purpose Flour

Some Bread Crumbs

Bacon (optional, but can use the bacon fat for frying)

A little oil or butter

Sour Cream, Tabasco, Soy Sauce (optional)

1½ c. sugar

¼ c. dry white wine

¼ c. fresh lemon juice

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Poached Tangerine Slices

Gourmet 2008

Recommended by member Patricia K.

I used this last week when our “extra fruit” order turned out to be a rather large bag of mandarins. Fortunately, I had stumbled on “Poached Tangerine Slices” shortly before the mandarin onslaught arrived! They were great served over yogurt.

6-7 (maybe more if they’re very small) tangerines or mandarins

1½ c. sugar

3 c. water

¼ c. dry white wine

¼ c. fresh lemon juice

Preheat oven to 325 degrees with rack in the middle. Slice tangerines, including peel, crosswise about ¼˝ thick (I removed the ends before slicing). Remove and discard seeds, then arrange tangerines in a 13 X 9-in. baking dish, overlapping if necessary.

Bring sugar and water to a boil in a small saucepan, stirring occasionally, then simmer 2 minutes. Stir in wine and lemon juice and return to a simmer. Pour over fruit.

Lay a sheet of parchment paper directly over fruit to keep submerged, then poach in oven until tender but not falling apart, 1 to 1½ hours. Discard parchment and cool fruit to warm or room temperature.

 

Re-Purposing Dishes

Breakfast Patties

So this week I used our leftover garlicky mashed potatoes for a delicious breakfast.  To the potatoes, I added 1 egg, a little bit of all purpose flour, some bread crumbs, and some chopped parsley and chives, salt and pepper to taste.  Mixed well, made patties and fried in some fat.  It was breakfast and I had made bacon, ergo I used bacon fat.  Make sure the fat is good and hot, fry until crispy and golden, gently flip and fry until the other side is golden and crispy too.  We enjoyed these with said bacon and fried eggs, one of Nigel's favorite breakfasts!

 

Leftover Rice and Veg

Again, we turned this into a breakfast.  Re-heat the rice in a skillet with a little oil or butter.  You can add some more greens if you like, better yet, this is the perfect time to add the green tops from your Spring Onion.  If you would like to make a fried rice, make a very thin omelette and add it to the rice once it is fully heated.  You can pre chop the omelette or chop it up in the fry pan.  This week I decided to go with a poached egg on top of our rice bowl.  We both added a dollop of sour cream, Nigel added green Tobasco to his, I added a little soy sauce to mine.  All in all, it made for a perfect breakfast, but of course you could enjoy this meal any time of the day!

 

Rice and Veg

I find I am really pretty exhausted these days.  Running to UCSF several times a week can be pretty draining on top of everything else.  So I love to make dishes that are easy and incorporate a couple of aspects of a meal into one dish.  And if I can "repurpose" that dish into a another meal all the better!

3 TB Butter or Oil

2 cups Brown Basmatti Rice

4 cups Vegetable or Eatwell Farm Chicken Stock

Salt

2-3 Carrots, washed and diced

1-2 Spring Onions, save the tops for another dish

1 Stalk Spring Garlic

Greens, you can use any of the greens from the box, chopped.

I like to saute the onion, garlic and carrots in the butter first.  Then add the rice and cook just until it smells a little nutty.  Add the stock, and the greens, mix well, then cook your rice how you like.

 

Nigel's First Big Meal - Steak, Mashed Potatoes and a Big Salad

I made him a big salad using some of the dandelion greens (very good for purifying the blood and liver), roasted beets, finely chopped Parsley and chives, and I threw in some chopped up mandarins.  

Roasting Beets - I like to roast beets simply.  I cut the greens off, but leave the crown on so no actual beet is exposed.  I trim the tail if it is too long. Basically I make sure the skin on the beet stays in tact.  Give it just a quick rinse then wipe dry.  Put the beet(s) on a sheet of aluminum foil large enough to seal up, drizzle on some olive oil and a sprinkling of salt.  Roast in the oven at 425 F until fork tender, timing completely depends on size of the beets.  When done, remove from the oven, keep wrapped and allow to cool enough to handle.  I cut the top and tail off, then the peel should slip off easily.  Chop and cool for your salad.  

Wash the spinach well, and spin to dry.  Wash the dandelion and chop.  I like to add finely chopped parsley and chives to my salads which sometimes I add to the dressing, sometimes I just toss in.  I peeled a couple of mandarins, then chopped the individual segments into thirds so I could easily pop out the seeds.

For the dressing I used some fresh OJ from one orange I had leftover from the previous week, plus I added the zest from the orange.  Used about 1 tsp of grainy mustard, salt and pepper to taste.  Mixed it all well then drizzled in some olive oil and added a 1 to 2 TB of yogurt.  I was going for more of a slightly creamy, less oily dressing.  Put all the salad fixings in a large bowl, poured on some of the dressing, tossed well and tasted.  Added some more dressing to my liking and saved the rest for later.  A few raisins, nuts, feta, or blue cheese would be nice additions to this salad.

Mashed Potatoes with a Spring Garlic Twist

This was super simple and added a really lovely subtle garlic flavor to the potatoes.  I was cooking enough potatoes for probably 4 people (I love mashed potatoes and the leftovers we turn into potato cakes for breakfast).  While the potatoes are gently boiling add one stalk of Spring Garlic, tough outer skin removed.  I only used thebottom portion, and saved the greens for something else.  The garlic dissolved somewhere into the potatoes because I never found the stalk!  

 

How to get anyone to eat broccoli…

So, small confession. I really don’t enjoy broccoli. I don’t hate it (such a strong word), but it’s not my go to veg. I’m more of a potato, carrot, kale kinda lady. Also, according to spell check I cannot even spell broccoli, so my general feeling about it is pretty much “pfffffft”.

But, there is one way to get me to eat a ton of broccoli, and if you haven’t heard of No. 7 Sub Shop in NYC, prepare to have your mind blown. Tyler Kord makes amazing sandwiches, and you may have even seen his cookbook around “A Super Upsetting Cookbook About Sandwiches”. It will change your sandwich world. 

The No. 7 Broccoli Sub is as delicious as it is well-known (amongst a certain bunch of people), and I’m super happy to be handing it over to you today. It needs a few specialty ingredients, but they aren’t hard to find and the end result is totally worth it. 

I’ve also included a few basic broccoli to dos this week as well. Deb Perelman is a genius, and if you aren’t familiar with her outstanding blog, Smitten Kitchen, now is the time! She tests her recipes extensively, they are small household friendly, and most importantly: nothing I’ve ever made from her blog has been anything less than awesome. 

Enjoy! And eat your veggies!

 

 

No. 7 Broccoli Sub

Tyler Kord, A Super Upsetting Cookbook About Sandwiches

Makes two huge subs

1 can pitted lychees (available at Asian markets), drained and quartered

1 garlic clove, minced

One 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced

1 medium shallot, finely chopped

A few drops of sesame oil

1 tablespoon sugar

2 small dried chiles, chopped (a teaspoon of red chile flakes will work)

1 cup white vinegar

2 scallions, thinly sliced on a bias

2 soft Italian sub rolls, split lengthwise

4 tablespoons mayonnaise

1 pound broccoli, roasted

4 ounces ricotta salata or other salty cheese such as queso fresco, shredded (about 1 cup)

1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted

1/2 cup fried onions (the crispy kind from the grocery store are what you’re looking for)

In a mixing bowl, combine the lychees, garlic, ginger, shallot, sesame oil, sugar, chiles, vinegar and scallions. Let sit for at least an hour. 

In an oven preheated to 375 degrees, toast the sub rolls and reheat the broccoli if necessary. 

Spread 2 tablespoons of mayonnaise on each of the sub rolls.

Use tongs to stuff the rolls with broccoli. 

Top each sandwich with a little bit of the lychee mixture, followed by the ricotta salata, pine nuts, and fried shallots.

All other recipes can be found at: www.eatwell.com under the “CSA Farm Box” tab.  Just click “Recipes.”

This Week's Box: March 20th - 25th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Mandarins - They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Chard (or Dandelion Greens) - Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Lettuce - Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

Parsley - Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

*Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in fridge up to one week.

*Red Kale - Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

Dandelion Greens (or Chard) - Rinse well, wrap in a damp paper towel and place in a plastic bag and refrigerate. If the towel is kept moist, greens can last up to one week.

Green Garlic - It is such a delight to have this back in our harvest shares. My favorite way to enjoy is to stir fry the chopped garlic in a skillet with some olive oil. Then stir in eggs for a delicious green garlic scrambled eggs. Store in the crisper. Will last at least a week.

Lemon (Twin Girls Farm) - This versatile fruit adds a great touch to winter greens and salads. It will store longer in crisper of fridge, but if you are going to use it within a week it can be stored on the counter. From our long time friend Nacho at Twin Girls Farm in Fresno.

*Spring Onions - Spring onions are onions harvested at the immature stage, when they have just begun to form their bulb and are still green on top. Their flavor is a little milder since they haven't yet fully developed. Spring onions should be kept in a closed container, to prevent drying out, in the refrigerator and should last a couple of weeks.

*Beets - Cut the tops off to keep beets firm (be sure to keep the greens!) by leaving any top on the root vegetables draws moisture from the root, making the lose flavor and firmness. Beets should be washed and kept in an open container with a wet towel on top. Keeps for several weeks.

*Raisins (Capay Canyon Ranch) - Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

No. 7 Broccoli Sub

Basic Crispy Broccoli with Lemon and Garlic

Broccoli Slaw

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: No. 7 Broccoli Sub

1 can pitted lychees (available at Asian markets), drained and quartered

1 garlic clove, minced

One 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced

1 medium shallot, finely chopped

A few drops of sesame oil

1 tablespoon sugar

2 small dried chiles, chopped (a teaspoon of red chile flakes will work)

1 cup white vinegar

2 scallions, thinly sliced on a bias

2 soft Italian sub rolls, split lengthwise

4 tablespoons mayonnaise

1 pound broccoli, roasted

4 ounces ricotta salata or other salty cheese such as queso fresco, shredded (about 1 cup)

1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted

1/2 cup fried onions (the crispy kind from the grocery store are what you’re looking for)

Shopping list for: Basic Crispy Broccoli with Lemon and Garlic

1 pound fresh broccoli

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

1 large or 2 small garlic cloves, minced

Shopping list for: Broccoli Slaw

2 heads of broccoli

1/2 cup thinly sliced almonds, toasted

1/3 cup dried cranberries or Raisins from the box

1/2 cup buttermilk, well-shaken

1/3 cup mayonnaise (this is more than is in the original, to thicken the dressing further)

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

1 tablespoon sugar

3 tablespoons finely chopped shallot (or, you could just use a little extra red onion to simplify it)

Shopping list for all recipes:

1 can pitted lychees (available at Asian markets), drained and quartered

1 garlic clove; plus 1 large or 2 small garlic cloves

One 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced

1 medium shallot; plus 3 tablespoons finely chopped

A few drops of sesame oil

2 tablespoons sugar

2 small dried chiles, chopped (a teaspoon of red chile flakes will work)

1 cup white vinegar

2 scallions, thinly sliced on a bias

2 soft Italian sub rolls, split lengthwise

4 tablespoons mayonnaise

2 pounds broccoli; plus 2 heads of broccoli

4 ounces ricotta salata or other salty cheese such as queso fresco, shredded (about 1 cup)

1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted

1/2 cup fried onions (the crispy kind from the grocery store are what you’re looking for)

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

1/2 cup thinly sliced almonds, toasted

1/3 cup dried cranberries or Raisins from the box

1/2 cup buttermilk, well-shaken

1/3 cup mayonnaise (this is more than is in the original, to thicken the dressing further)

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

No. 7 Broccoli Sub

Tyler Kord, A Super Upsetting Cookbook About Sandwiches

Makes two huge subs

1 can pitted lychees (available at Asian markets), drained and quartered

1 garlic clove, minced

One 1-inch piece of ginger, peeled and minced

1 medium shallot, finely chopped

A few drops of sesame oil

1 tablespoon sugar

2 small dried chiles, chopped (a teaspoon of red chile flakes will work)

1 cup white vinegar

2 scallions, thinly sliced on a bias

2 soft Italian sub rolls, split lengthwise

4 tablespoons mayonnaise

1 pound broccoli, roasted

4 ounces ricotta salata or other salty cheese such as queso fresco, shredded (about 1 cup)

1/2 cup pine nuts, toasted

1/2 cup fried onions (the crispy kind from the grocery store are what you’re looking for)

 

In a mixing bowl, combine the lychees, garlic, ginger, shallot, sesame oil, sugar, chiles, vinegar and scallions. Let sit for at least an hour. 

In an oven preheated to 375 degrees, toast the sub rolls and reheat the broccoli if necessary. 

Spread 2 tablespoons of mayonnaise on each of the sub rolls.

Use tongs to stuff the rolls with broccoli. 

Top each sandwich with a little bit of the lychee mixture, followed by the ricotta salata, pine nuts, and fried shallots. 

 

Broccoli Slaw

Adapted from Smitten Kitchen

Makes about six cups of slaw

2 heads of broccoli

1/2 cup thinly sliced almonds, toasted

1/3 cup dried cranberries

1/2 small red onion, finely chopped

 

Buttermilk Dressing

1/2 cup buttermilk, well-shaken

1/3 cup mayonnaise (this is more than is in the original, to thicken the dressing further)

2 tablespoons cider vinegar

1 tablespoon sugar

3 tablespoons finely chopped shallot (or, you could just use a little extra red onion to simplify it)

 

Trim broccoli and cut it into large chunks. From here, you can either feed it through your food processor’s slicing blade, use a mandoline to cut it into thin slices, or simply had chop it into smaller pieces.

Toss the sliced broccoli with the almonds, cranberries and red onion in a large bowl. 

Meanwhile, whisk the dressing ingredients in a smaller one, with a good pinch of salt and black pepper. 

Pour the dressing over the broccoli and toss it well. Season well with salt and pepper to taste.

 

Basic Crispy Broccoli with Lemon and Garlic

Adapted from Smitten Kitchen

Serves 2 as a side

1 pound fresh broccoli

3 tablespoons olive oil, divided

1/2 teaspoon coarse or kosher salt

A few pinches of pepper flakes, to taste

Finely grated zest of half a lemon, or more to taste

1 large or 2 small garlic cloves, minced

Juice of half a lemon, or more to taste, to finish

Heat oven to 425°F (220°C).

Prep your broccoli: Slice straight through the broccoli stem(s) as close to the crown of florets as possible. Don’t let the stems go to waste. I peel off the tough outer skin and knots and cut the stems into 1/2-inch segments; they cook up wonderfully this way, and at the same speed as the florets.

Drizzle the first tablespoon of oil over your baking sheet or roasting pan and brush or roll it around so it’s evenly coated.

 In a large bowl, toss prepared florets and stems with remaining olive oil, garlic, pepper flakes, salt and lemon zest until they’re evenly coated. Spread broccoli in an even layer in prepared pan.

Roast for 20 minutes, then use a spatula to flip and move pieces around for even cooking. Roast another 10 to 15 minutes, checking every 5, until broccoli is toasty and as crisp as you like it. 

From the oven, taste a floret for seasoning and add more salt and pepper flakes if needed. Shower with fresh lemon juice and eat immediately.

Cabbage Salad With Creamy Harissa Tahini Dressing

I have had the luxury of travel over the past months and am looking forward to welcoming some of what I have tasted into our palettes in the future. 

As we are in the heat of cabbage season in the box, I am going to give you some ideas on how to move through it.  I really enjoy cabbage as a hearty salad that I add some protein to and am also able to enjoy as lunch through the week.

Dressing:

1/3 cup tahini paste

1 T Harissa Paste (optional)

5 T extra-virgin olive oil, divided

3 T fresh lemon/citrus juice 

2 cloves garlic, finely minced or microplaned

½ C Water

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Salad:

1 pound finely shredded red cabbage (about 1/2 head)

1 bunch red kale, cleaned & chopped

4-6 Tokyo Turnips, washed and sliced

1 small red onion, thinly sliced (can sub spring onion)

1/2 C roughly chopped mint

1/2 C roughly chopped parsley

1/2 C roughly chopped cilantro

2 T roasted sesame seeds

 

Proteins:

1 pound shredded chicken breast or

Asian Roasted Tofu

Combine chicken with olive oil, 1 T lemon juice, & 1 clove minced garlic in a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper and massage with clean hands to work the dressing into the chicken. Add cabbage and red onion and toss to combine. Set aside.

In a small bowl, combine tahini, lemon juice, minced garlic. Whisking constantly, drizzle in olive oil. Slowly whisk in up to 1/2 cup water until a thick, pancake-batter-like consistency is reached. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Add mint, parsley, and cilantro to bowl with shredded chicken and cabbage, with the dressing. Toss with clean hands to combine. Adjust to taste with more salt, pepper, or lemon juice as necessary. Transfer to serving platter or bowl and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve immediately. Salad is great the next couple of days!

 

Seeing Spring Fly Around Our House

Two weeks ago, I had my first cataract surgery.   It had been a long time coming.  What an amazing thing to be given clear vision just in time for the glorious colors of Spring.  On theseclear Spring days, you can see the snow covered Sierras from the farm.  There is so much snow!  After months of cloudy, rainy days it only took a little bit of sunshine for the grasses around the house to explode into action, and double in height.  Our house is a verdant hillock, the green can be seen from far down our road.  Walking by our pond, I watched an enormous heron fly in.  He settled down on the bank opposite the geese and soaked up the rays.  This time of year there are unbelievable amounts and varieties of birds flying about. I am so grateful to see the giant hawks that live in the trees behind our house.  Walking past our olive trees, I startled a flock of mourning doves.  In the evenings, Connie has spotted large owls behind the house, and we suspect there is a big nest in the poplars back there, along with the hawk nests.  We do have the owl boxes out on the farm adjacent to the orchard where you can spot plenty of owls at night.  We have a few rogue chickens that have taken up residence around the barn with Stella.  The hens have hatched quite a few chicks, and for some reason the chicks love to be close to Stella when she is in the barn.  Huge hooves and baby chicks, oy!  That might not seem like the best combination, but Stella is a gentle giant and the ultimate mother, if they get in her way she noses them over. Over the past couple of months, we have lost quite a few of our house chickens, Connie suspects it might be the owls.  Life comes and life goes, but in the meantime there is SO much to see, and I am enjoying every bit of it.  All this brought me to wonder whether we have any members who are bird watchers.  The farm in the Springtime is an amazing place to enjoy our avian friends.  As you know, members are always welcome, so if you want to come up for some bird watching, just let us know you are coming!

 

This Week's Box: March 13th - 18th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Mandarins - They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

*Chard (or Dandelion Greens) - Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Turnips - If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days.

Chives - Wrap in a damp paper towel and store in a plastic bag in the fridge. Keeps about 1 week.

*Parsley - Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

*Stir Fry Mix - These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

Red Kale - Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

Dandelion Greens (or Chard) - Rinse well, wrap in a damp paper towel and place in a plastic bag and refrigerate. If the towel is kept moist, greens can last up to one week.

Cabbage - Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week.

*Green Garlic - It is such a delight to have this back in our harvest shares. My favorite way to enjoy is to stir fry the chopped garlic in a skillet with some olive oil. Then stir in eggs for a delicious green garlic scrambled eggs. Store in the crisper. Will last at least a week.

Spring Onions - Spring onions are onions harvested at the immature stage, when they have just begun to form their bulb and are still green on top. Their flavor is a little milder since they haven't yet fully developed. Spring onions should be kept in a closed container, to prevent drying out, in the refrigerator and should last a couple of weeks.

*Raisins (Capay Canyon Ranch) - Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Cabbage Salad With Creamy Harissa Tahini Dressing

Colecannon With Kale and Chard

Irish Soda Bead

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Cabbage Salad With Creamy Harissa Tahini Dressing

1/3 cup tahini paste

1 T Harissa Paste (optional)

5 T extra-virgin olive oil, divided

3 T fresh lemon/citrus juice 

2 cloves garlic, finely minced or microplaned

1 small red onion, thinly sliced (can sub spring onion)

1/2 C roughly chopped mint

1/2 C roughly chopped cilantro

2 T roasted sesame seeds

1 pound shredded chicken breast or Asian Roasted Tofu

Shopping list for: Colecannon With Kale and Chard

3 pounds russet potatoes, scrubbed and peeled

1 C low-fat milk

¾ Sour Cream or Full Fat Greek Yogurt

4 tablespoons unsalted butter or extra virgin olive oil

Shopping list for: Irish Soda Bead

2 cups AP flour

⅓  C sugar

¼  t baking soda

 ½  t kosher salt

1 t baking powder

 ¼  C unsalted butter

Bourbon (optional for soaking raisins)

1 egg, beaten

1 t vanilla

1 C buttermilk

Shopping list for all recipes:

1/3 cup tahini paste

1 T Harissa Paste (optional)

5 T extra-virgin olive oil, divided

3 T fresh lemon/citrus juice 

2 cloves garlic, finely minced or microplaned

1 small red onion, thinly sliced (can sub spring onion)

1/2 C roughly chopped mint

1/2 C roughly chopped cilantro

2 T roasted sesame seeds

1 pound shredded chicken breast or Asian Roasted Tofu

3 pounds russet potatoes, scrubbed and peeled

1 C low-fat milk

¾ Sour Cream or Full Fat Greek Yogurt

4 tablespoons unsalted butter or extra virgin olive oil

2 cups AP flour

⅓  C sugar

¼  t baking soda

1 t baking powder

 ¼  C unsalted butter

Bourbon (optional for soaking raisins)

1 egg, beaten

1 t vanilla

1 C buttermilk

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Irish Soda Bread

from my childhood, by my Mom, Donna

2 cups AP flour

⅓  C sugar

¼  t baking soda

 ½  t kosher salt

1 t baking powder

 ¼  C unsalted butter

¾  C raisins, as an adult I have come to soften these in bourbon

1 egg, beaten

1 t vanilla

1 C buttermilk

Stir together in a large bowl the flour, sugar, soda, salt and baking powder. With a pastry blender cut in butter until the mixture looks like corn meal. Stir in raisins and make a well in the center of the ingredients. In another bowl, stir together the egg, vanilla and buttermilk. Pour into the well and stir just until the flour is thoroughly moistened. Place dough in a well-greased 9 or 10 inch iron frying pan and bake at 350 degrees for 50 to 60 minutes or until a deep golden color is reached. Serve immediately!

Servings: 8

Source: The Mercury News Food Section, 1973

 

Colecannon w/ Kale & Chard

adapted from NYT

3 pounds russet potatoes, scrubbed and peeled

 Salt

1 pound (1 large bunch) kale, either curly or cavolo nero, ribs removed, leaves washed

1 C low-fat milk

¾ Sour Cream or Full Fat Greek Yogurt

1 bunch Spring Onions chopped (about 6 scallions)

2 Green Garlic

 freshly ground pepper

4 tablespoons unsalted butter or extra virgin olive oil

Cover the potatoes with water in a saucepan, add about 1 T kosher salt and bring to a boil. Reduce the heat to medium, cover partially and cook until tender all the way through when pierced with a knife, about 30 to 45 minutes. Drain off the water, return the potatoes to the pan, cover tightly and let steam over very low heat for another 2 to 3 minutes. Remove from the heat and mash with a potato masher or a fork, through a food mill or in a standing mixer fitted with the paddle, while still hot.

While the potatoes are cooking, roughly chop the kale/chard. Slice the spring onions and mince the green garlic.  With 1 T of EVOO or Butter heating in a large sautee pan, sizzle the onions & garlic to release the flavors into the oil.  Add Kale/Chard and cook for 4 to 6 minutes, until the leaves are tender but still bright green. Allow to cool for a couple of minutes, then drain and squeeze out excess water. Chop fine (you can use a food processor).

Towards the end of the potato cooking time, combine the milk and yogurt/sour cream in a saucepan and bring to a simmer. Remove from the heat and let steep for a few minutes. Stir the chopped kale into the hot mashed potatoes and beat in the milk and butter or olive oil. The mixture should be fluffy (you can do this in an electric mixer fitted with the paddle). Add salt to taste and freshly ground pepper. Serve hot, right away, or keep warm in a double boiler: set the bowl in a saucepan filled one third of the way with water. Make sure the water doesn’t touch the bottom of the bowl. Bring the water to a simmer. Stir the potato and kale mixture from time to time.

This is lovely served with a few grilled or sautéed sausages or a fresh piece of grilled meat. 

Any leftovers can be fried up on Saturday Morning in some butter or olive oil as potato pancakes w/ a perfectly poached Eatwell Egg!  

 

Cabbage Salad With Creamy Harissa Tahini Dressing

by Paige

Dressing:

1/3 cup tahini paste

1 T Harissa Paste (optional)

5 T extra-virgin olive oil, divided

3 T fresh lemon/citrus juice 

2 cloves garlic, finely minced or microplaned

½ C Water

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

 

Salad:

1 pound finely shredded red cabbage (about 1/2 head)

1 bunch red kale, cleaned & chopped

4-6 Tokyo Turnips, washed and sliced

1 small red onion, thinly sliced (can sub spring onion)

1/2 C roughly chopped mint

1/2 C roughly chopped parsley

1/2 C roughly chopped cilantro

2 T roasted sesame seeds

 

Proteins:

1 pound shredded chicken breast or

Asian Roasted Tofu

Combine chicken with olive oil, 1 T lemon juice, & 1 clove minced garlic in a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper and massage with clean hands to work the dressing into the chicken. Add cabbage and red onion and toss to combine. Set aside.

In a small bowl, combine tahini, lemon juice, minced garlic. Whisking constantly, drizzle in olive oil. Slowly whisk in up to 1/2 cup water until a thick, pancake-batter-like consistency is reached. Season to taste with salt and pepper.

Add mint, parsley, and cilantro to bowl with shredded chicken and cabbage, with the dressing. Toss with clean hands to combine. Adjust to taste with more salt, pepper, or lemon juice as necessary. Transfer to serving platter or bowl and sprinkle with sesame seeds. Serve immediately. Salad is great the next couple of days!

 

Kaleifornia - Recipes and Ideas From Amie

I have spent a lot of time hating on kale. I mean *really* hating on it. Stemming from my childhood when my Dad would boil it (literally boil it) into submission with none of the lovely flavors (or techniques) you find in actually good recipes for greens, for years I’ve suffered a dread of it appearing on my plate.

And this is so unfortunate because kale is really quite lovely when handled properly. A little time and attention, and you’ve got an ingredient that works in a variety of ways. You can bake it into chips, add it to breads or soups (or bread soup!), puree it into a smoothie, juice it, cook it down with some lovely bacon, or just have it in a super delicious salad. 

And that’s what I have for you today. Now, I know kale salads are out there in abundance, but this kale salad is a little different. It’s going to take you some time to put together but it’s totally worth it. It’s flexible enough to accept a range of ingredients from your box, and you can adjust it to your tastes and the season. This round has the last potatoes/sweet potatoes/butternut you have lingering from the winter, but come spring feel free to use radishes, raw peas, blanched green beans, or whatever else you have in the fridge that strikes your fancy. 

Note: This makes a lot of dressing (about 1 cup) but don’t worry, it holds a long time in the fridge and it’s great on everything! 

Amie’s Kale Salad for All Seasons and Occasions

Shallot Vinaigrette

Adapted from Serious Eats 

https://www.facebook.com/seriouseats/

1 shallot, peeled and minced fine

1 sprig of green garlic, white and pale green part, sliced or minced fine

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar

1 tablespoon water

1 teaspoon honey

¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil

Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper

Put everything into a jar with a tight fitting lid. Shake vigorously until emulsified. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Vinaigrette will keep in the refrigerator for up to 2 weeks.

THE Kale Salad

This feeds 2 very hungry people as a meal, or four people as a side. Feel free to increase or decrease components depending on your taste. Reserve the final dressing if you want to pack it for lunch the next day, and I like this with a little baked marinated tofu or chicken on top (it’s really not great with beef, pork, or fish/shellfish). 

1 recipe shallot vinaigrette (previous recipe)

1 bunch kale

2 cups roasted vegetables (butternut, potato, sweet potato, turnip, rutabaga - your choice)

1 cup cooked grain (wheat berry, farro, barley - again your choice)

½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds

¼ cup dried fruit (cranberries or raisins)

A few tablespoons good quality olive oil

Kosher salt

Optional: 1 cup diced roast chicken or baked marinated tofu

In a small bowl, place your cooked grain (the Eatwell wheat berries are excellent in this). Pour ¼ cup of the shallot vinaigrette on and toss to coat. Don’t skip this step. The grain will soak in the dressing, and you won’t overdress your salad. 

While your grain is settling, wash your kale and remove the tough stems. Dry it, and chop it fine. Place in a large bowl, and pour 1 tbsp olive oil and a sprinkle of salt on it, and give it a good massage for a minute until all the leaves are coated and feel nice. 

Add the grain to the kale, and add another ¼ cup of the vinaigrette. Toss to combine and divide into serving bowls. Top with the roasted vegetables, toasted pumpkin seeds, and dried fruit. A few chopped herbs, a little watermelon radish, or other colorful fresh veg would be lovely here for contrast if you have some available. If you are adding protein, now is the time. 

Pour yourself and your favorite dining companion a glass of something, and dive in while relishing the bounty of your CSA. 

Spring Planting

Our spring plants have arrived from Headstart Nursery. We were holding off receiving them due to the extremely wet fields. They arrive in these large bins and the trays are placed under our shade structure until they are transplanted into the fields.

This Year's Event Season

The last few years we opened all the events to the general public.  Our hope was to get as many people on the farm as possible to experience what we do here, and maybe some of them would become members.  It is a wonderful thing sharing what we have created here on this land with people, especially those who live in the City.  Promoting and managing such large events is a lot of work, but I can tell you it was a lot of work when they were small.  The small events became too much for just Nigel and I to manage.  With Nigel's illness we knew we couldn't run the events on our own anymore so we decided to create an actual position for someone and really expand the events to make it worth their while.  The past couple of years we have hosted literally thousands of people. Something we could not have managed without the hard work Emily and Connie have put into making those days happen.  But there was something missing, the intimacy and connection we have with members at smaller events.  So when the three of us met last week to set the dates we decided to go back to the original style - events for members, and their guests, and if there is space, Eatwell Alumni and their guests.

No worries, you can still bring Aunt Betsy and the neighbors down the street.  We just aren't opening up to the general public.  I really hope everyone will make it up for at least one event.  Tickets will still go through Brown Paper Tickets.  Connie will let you know when they go live, but here are the dates.

Strawberry Days on the Farm: Sunday, April 30th; Sunday, May 7th; Sunday, May 14th; Sunday, May 28th

Lavender Harvest Weekend: Friday, June 9th - Sunday, June 11th

Summer Solstice Sleepover and Garlic Braiding Party: Saturday, June 24th - Sunday, June 25th

Tomato Sauce Canning Party and Sleepover (Tentative Dates): Saturday, July 29th; Saturday, August 5th; Saturday, August 19th

Pumpkin Party: Sunday, October 15th

 

This Week's Box: March 6th - 11th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Mandarins - They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

*Tangelos - A tangelo is identifiable by its knob-like formation on its stem end and their deep orange color. It will keep a few days at room temperature but, for longer storage, the fruits should be refrigerated. We hope you enjoy their delicious tart-sweet flavor.

*Turnips (or Radishes) - If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days.

*Chives - Wrap in a damp paper towel and store in a plastic bag in the fridge. Keeps about 1 week.

*Stir Fry Mix - These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

*Kale (or Dandelion Greens) - Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

*Dandelion Greens (or Kale) - Rinse well, wrap in a damp paper towel and place in a plastic bag and refrigerate. If the towel is kept moist, greens can last up to one week.

Carrots (Terra Firma Farm) - These come from Los Pablos at Terra Firma Farm in Winters. We grow amazing tasting carrots here on our farm but the germination is sporadic because our soil is a little too heavy. I covet the field next to us as it has a nice sandy area. Forgive me. Store in the crisper wrapped to prevent drying out. Should last at least 7 days.

*Radishes (or Turnips) - Store radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator and they should keep for at least a week. If your radishes have leaves attached, it is best to remove them, as they tend to leach moisture from the root.

Cabbage - Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week.

Green Garlic - It is such a delight to have this back in our harvest shares. My favorite way to enjoy is to stir fry the chopped garlic in a skillet with some olive oil. Then stir in eggs for a delicious green garlic scrambled eggs. Store in the crisper. Will last at least a week.

Lemons (Twin Girls Farm) - This versatile fruit adds a great touch to winter greens and salads. It will store longer in crisper of fridge, but if you are going to use it within a week it can be stored on the counter. From our long time friend Nacho at Twin Girls Farm in Fresno.

*Spring Onions - Spring onions are onions harvested at the immature stage, when they have just begun to form their bulb and are still green on top. Their flavor is a little milder since they haven't yet fully developed. Spring onions should be kept in a closed container, to prevent drying out, in the refrigerator and should last a couple of weeks.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Shallot Vinaigrette

Amie's Kale Salad for All Seasons and Occasions

Honey Glazed Radishes or Turnips

Roasted Cabbage with Bacon

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Shallot Vinaigrette

1 shallot, peeled and minced fine

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar

1 teaspoon honey

¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil

Shopping list for: Amie's Kale Salad for All Seasons and Occasions

1 recipe shallot vinaigrette (previous recipe)

1 bunch kale

2 cups roasted vegetables (butternut, potato, sweet potato, turnip, rutabaga - your choice)

1 cup cooked grain (wheat berry, farro, barley - again your choice)

½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds

¼ cup dried fruit (cranberries or raisins)

A few tablespoons good quality olive oil

Optional: 1 cup diced roast chicken or baked marinated tofu

Shopping list for: Honey Glazed Radishes or Turnips

6 T butter

1 large shallot (diced) or the Spring Onions from your box

1/4 C broth or Eatwell Farm Chicken Broth

1 T honey

2 T mint leaves, thinly sliced and additional to garnish

Shopping list for: Roasted Cabbage with Bacon

Olive oil

4 slices thick bacon, 6 to 8 oz

Shopping list for all recipes:

1 shallot, peeled and minced fine; plus 1 large shallot (diced) or the Spring Onions from your box

2 teaspoons Dijon mustard

3 tablespoons red wine vinegar

1 teaspoon honey; plus 1 T honey

¾ cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 bunch kale

2 cups roasted vegetables (butternut, potato, sweet potato, turnip, rutabaga - your choice)

1 cup cooked grain (wheat berry, farro, barley - again your choice)

½ cup toasted pumpkin seeds

¼ cup dried fruit (cranberries or raisins)

A few tablespoons good quality olive oil; plus more to drizzle roasted cabbage

Optional: 1 cup diced roast chicken or baked marinated tofu

6 T butter

1/4 C broth or Eatwell Farm Chicken Broth

2 T mint leaves, thinly sliced and additional to garnish

4 slices thick bacon, 6 to 8 oz

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

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