So Many Lavender Products

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Since we just had the big Lavender Harvest, we have so many great products to share with you all. Our favorite two include the hydrosol and essential oil.  

Hydrosols are typically a good pH match for our skin and so really nice for rehydrating. The lavender, in general, is good for burns, so the hydrosol spray is also good to spray on a sun burn.  

The lavender essential oil has many applications; it is good for just about everything.  I use it liberally on Nigel’s head, and his wrists, particularly when he is obviously agitated.  It definitely seems to help calm him down.  Lavender EO is also the perfectfirst aid product because you can use it on burns or put a drop or two on minor scrapes and cuts. 

We also have wonderful Massage Balm, Sugar Scrub, Salve, lavender bunches and Sachets. The balm and the sugar scrub are great for dry skin (we can thank the summer heat for that). I love how smooth my skin feels afterwards.  It does the best job of getting rid of all the grime (you know, sweat and farm dirt).  When I use the sugar scrub I only rinse it off, gently brushing off away the sugar, and then I pat dry to allow the oil to absorb into my skin. And afterwards I am refreshed and glowing.  Think I am way over due for a treatment now!

 

And I almost forgot one of the most popular ways we use lavender, and that is in the Lavender Salt! I guarantee if you use our Lavender Salt on a steak or hamburger, everyone will love it and no one will know what your secret ingredient is!  

 

You can order all of these products as add on items to come with your CSA share.  Saves you the trouble of shopping in the store and you get to support the farm.

An Update on Nigel

I realize some of you aren’t aware of Nigel’s current condition.  We did send an email out about it, but I know that not everyone always has a chance to read the emails.  About 3 1/2 weeks ago Nigel was admitted to UCSF. Many tests were run and the conclusion was the cancer has once again attacked his brain.  Because this happened before (a year ago, almost exactly) and he had the full course of radiation then, he has had his lifetime limit. There are no drugs currently available that will slow the cancer and radiation is not an option. When they sent us home we were told he had one, maybe two months left.  

 

These past weeks have been, well really there are no words to describe how it has been.  We have all learned a lot, mostly about how to manage pain. That is something we have gotten quite good at. We have learned that marijuana extracts do a much better job of managing pain and seizures than the prescribed narcotics.  Once we switched Nigel to a CBD extract (almost exclusively), his seizures stopped and the bouts of intense pain he suffered through have stopped, at least for now. He is much more talkative, although most of time, what he says doesn’t make a lot of sense.  It is quite obvious that the thoughts going through his mind are about the farm. We hear him say things about lavender, tomatoes, chickens, or today he told me “he is doing an excellent job”.  Don't know who “he” is, but I am happy to know the work he is dong is excellent. He rolls his eyes when we ask too many questions, but then tells us it’s ok.  The greatest gifts are the big smiles we get from him many times a day.  

 

Watching him obviously working things out in his head, it is impossible to imagine he will not be with us someday soon. I still can’t believe it.  How is it possible that someone so strong, so full of passion for his life will be taken like this?

 

Many of you have sent us cards, emails and text messages.  I want to thank you all, they all mean so much to me.  I share them with Nigel when I can, mostly I have him look at the pretty pictures and tell him how much his CSA family loves him.  I let him know that all of you have told him that he has made their lives a little better. It would be great if some of you are able to keep him company. His parents have been here for 3 weeks now, but have to fly back to England soon. Cameron and I spend good portions of the day working, so we are not always free to go and sit with him. If you would like to visit Nigel please text me. My number is 530-554-3971.

THIS WEEK'S BOX: JUNE 26TH- JULY 2ND

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Peaches- Peaches are climacteric, which means they continue to ripen after picking and should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. After ripe, refrigerate as necessary to prevent spoiling. Will last up to a week.  

*Collards- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last up to a week.

Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week. 

*Basil - Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week.

*Zucchini - Store zucchini unwashed in a perforated or loosely closed plastic bag for up to one week. Don't wash or cut up the zucchini until ready to use. To freeze zucchini for later use, wash and cut into 1-inch chunks before freezing in a zipper-topped freezer bag.

Radish- Store radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator and they should keep for at least a week. If your radishes have leaves attached, it is best to remove them, as they tend to leach moisture from the root.

Plums- Store ripe plums in the refrigerator. This will keep them in top shape and prevent fast deterioration. Place them in an open plastic bag - not a sealed one. Plums stored in the refrigerator will last two to four weeks.

*Beets- Cut the tops off to keep beets firm (be sure to keep the greens!) by leaving any top on the root vegetables draws moisture from the root, making them lose flavor and firmness. Beets should be washed and kept in an open container with a wet towel on top. Keeps for several weeks.

*Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

Potatoes- Store in a cool, dry, dark place. Should keep for a week or more easily. If you want to store them for longer, say 2 or 3 months, keep them between 45-55 degrees, again in a dry place out of the light.

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Master Frittata

Roasted Potatoes and Radishes

Beet and Cabbage Borscht

Zucchini Chard Cakes

Peach & Plum Caprese Salad

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Master Frittata

3 tbsp olive oil

1/2 cup onions

8 eggs

1/2 cup Milk

Shopping list for: Roasted Potatoes and Radishes 

2 to 3 tablespoons olive oil

5 sprigs fresh thyme

Shopping list for: Beet and Cabbage Borscht

4 cups chicken stock

1 cup dry white wine

1 TB balsamic vinegar

Generous pinch of ground cumin

Unflavored yogurt or sour cream (about ½ cup)

Shopping list for: Zucchini Chard Cakes

Bunch of parsley

1 clove of garlic

1 egg

1 cup of flour

½ tsp salt

Splash of milk

2 Tb oil

Shopping list for: Peach & Plum Caprese Salad

Fresh Mozzarella

Handful of Basil leaves

Shopping list for all recipes:

Fresh Mozzarella

Handful of Basil leaves

Bunch of parsley

1 clove of garlic

1 egg

1 cup of flour

½ tsp salt

Splash of milk

9 T olive oil 

4 cups chicken stock

1 cup dry white wine

1 TB balsamic vinegar

ground cumin

Unflavored yogurt or sour cream (about ½ cup)

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Master Frittata

From CSA Member Amie B.

 

3 tbsp olive oil

1/2 cup onions

8 eggs

1/2 cup Milk

Salt & pepper

Your choice of meat/tofu/cheese/ veggies (The Zucchini, Potato, Red Kale or Collards from the box works well!)

 

Tips: 

  • This formula works best in a 2qt sauté or cast iron pan. Use any pan you like that can go in the oven, just bear in mind that larger land will make a flatter, denser frittata.
  • Don't over work it! Beat the eggs to combine, but no need to beat them into submission. You'll get a better texture, and a lighter dish.
  • Cook your mix ins! Especially greens, mushrooms, or other veggie or protein that will give off a lot of liquid. Squeeze excess liquid from cooked greens before adding.

 

Preheat oven to 350 F.

 

Heat a 10" oven proof skillet and add olive oil and onion. Cook onion until soft and remove from heat.

 

Whisk eggs, milk, salt & pepper until just combined. Pour into pan.

 

Evenly scatter cooked mix ins around the pan. Top with cheese (if using) and pop it into the oven.

 

Cook for 20-25 minutes or until set and a little color is on top & cheese is melted.

Zucchini Chard Cakes

1lb zucchini

½ onion

Bunch of chard

Bunch of parsley

1 clove of garlic

1 egg

1 cup of flour

½ tsp salt

Splash of milk

2 Tb oil and some for the pan

 

Shred the zucchini with a box grater or food processor. Next, grate the onion. Remove the stems from the chard (and save for another purpose, the frittata?) Then chop the leaves. Combine the egg, salt, and flour in a bowl. Add in the zucchini, chard, onion, garlic, and parsley and stir for form a thick batter. Add just a splash of milk and the oil to form a more workable, pourable batter. Heat your skillet and lightly coat it with oil when hot. Preheat the oven to 200F. Pour ¼ cup spoonful of batter onto the hot skillet and cook 2-3 minutes per side until browned. Flip and cook another 2 minutes. Transfer the cakes to the oven to keep warm while cooking the remainder of the cakes. Serve as a side, topped with tomato chutney or as a light summer dinner with a side of greens.

Peach & Plum Caprese Salad

Via Loveandlemons.com

Ripe Peaches

Ripe Plums

Fresh Mozzarella

Handful of Basil leaves

Drizzle of olive oil

Sea salt & freshly ground pepper

Slice peaches, plums and mozzarella into bite sized pieces and assemble the salad with basil leaves in between. Drizzle the salad with olive oil and season with salt and pepper

 

Beet and Cabbage Borscht

Via Foodnetwork.com

4 cups chicken stock

1 cup dry white wine

1 pound or 6 cups cabbage, cored and shredded

1 bunch beets, peeled and cut into fine julienne

1 TB balsamic vinegar

Generous pinch of ground cumin

Salt and freshly ground black pepper to taste

Unflavored yogurt or sour cream (about ½ cup)

 

Directions

Place the chicken stock, wine, cabbage, beets and onion in a large pot. Bring to a boil, reduce heat and simmer until vegetables are tender, for about 30 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the vinegar, cumin, salt and pepper. (This can be prepared ahead, cooled, covered and set aside at cool room temperature for several hours or refrigerated for several days.) To serve, remove from the refrigerator for about 30 minutes before serving if presenting chilled. Simmer over medium-high heat to reheat if presenting warm. Ladle into 4 soup bowls. Spoon on a generous dollop of yogurt. Serve immediately.

Roasted Potatoes and Radishes

Via Relish.com

Ingredients

2pounds potatoes

1bunch radishes

2 to 3tablespoons tablespoons olive oil

2teaspoons coarse salt or Eatwell Farm’s Thyme salt

1teaspoon black pepper

5sprigs fresh thyme

 

Instructions

Preheat oven to 375F.

Place radishes and potatoes on a baking sheet pan. Drizzle with olive oil and toss to coat. Sprinkle with salt, black pepper and leaves from thyme sprigs.

Roast 40 minutes, rotating pan and stirring halfway through cooking time, until tender.

Summer Solstice Sleepover and Garlic Braiding Party

The Summer Solstice falls on Wednesday, June 21st this year. I recently came across a very good reason to celebrate the summer solstice. There have been numerous studies correlating the length of daylight and happiness. It has been researched that people are much happier this time of year compared to the winter months. 

I read about one study that used social media, tweets, randomly selected from people all over the world. It was determined that it wasn’t necessarily the length of daylight but the relative change in day length from one day to another that affected a person’s attitude.  

That is, leading up to the summer solstice, people tended to have a more positive outlook versus when the change in daylight was negative. The Summer Solstice could be the happiest we will ever be for the year. How are you planning on spending all your positive energy? 

Eatwell Farm is holding its annual Summer Solstice Sleepover and Garlic Braiding Party this coming weekend, June 24th and 25th. We hope you can join us and celebrate summer. This overnight campout will include a potluck dinner, harvesting garlic and making garlic braids. The garlic braids are not only a great way to store your garlic, but it also looks really nice. This coming winter, when the days are shorter and you’re feeling a little down, you can pull a garlic bulb off your braid as a reminder of those long summer days full of sunshine and happiness.

This event is only open to the CSA Members, alumni, and their guests. Please email Organic@eatwell.com for ticket information.

The Plants Make Everything Better

Nigel is incredibly passionate about the plants on the farm. I’ve heard him say numerous times how the plants make everything better. 

There are a lot of stresses that come with farming. You are constantly working with Mother Nature, which doesn’t always cooperate. You are dealing with issues associated with pests, weather, markets, equipment, and people just to name a few. When dealing with tough circumstances on the farm, Nigel says the plants make everything better.  

I’ve grown to find solace in the plants, too. No matter how stressful life is, all it takes is going out in the field and seeing the beautiful rows of greens, the herbs in bloom, and a lovely crate of squash coming in from the fields and yes everything does seem better.

Round Zucchini

We’re excited to start having summer squash in the boxes. These adorable little orbs are a variety of zucchini. We refer to them as Eight ball Zucchini. They may be a little denser than the straight neck squashes, but can be used as you would any other summer squash. 

With this round shape, they are great for stuffing and roasting. You can also cut them into thick slices for the grill this summer.

This Week's Box: June 19th- June 25th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Peaches- Peaches are climacteric, which means they continue to ripen after picking and should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. After ripe, refrigerate as necessary to prevent spoiling. Will last up to a week.  

Collards- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last up to a week.

Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in the fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week. 

Turnips- Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an
open container with a moist cloth. Should keep for about a week.

*Basil - Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week.

*Zucchini - Store zucchini unwashed in a perforated or loosely closed plastic bag for up to one week. Don't wash or cut up the zucchini until ready to use. To freeze zucchini for later use, wash and cut into 1-inch chunks before freezing in a zipper-topped freezer bag.

*Radish- Store radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator and they should keep for at least a week. If your radishes have leaves attached, it is best to remove them, as they tend to leach moisture from the root.

*Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

Potatoes- Store in a cool, dry, dark place. Should keep for a week or more easily. If you want to store them for longer, say 2 or 3 months, keep them between 45-55 degrees, again in a dry place out of the light.

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Mediterranean Goddess Greens With Feta

Potatoes Yiachni

Lebanese Zucchini Stuffed with Lamb

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Mediterranean Goddess Greens With Feta

1 Lemon Juiced, zest reserved

4 cloves garlic

¼ C olive oil

4 oz. Feta packed in water, Bulgarian is awesome

½ Chopped Parsley

½ Chopped Mint

Zest of Lemon

Shopping list for: Lebanese Zucchini Stuffed with Lamb

½  pound ground lamb or turkey

½  cup medium-grain rice or Italian arborio rice

4 garlic cloves, mashed with a tsp salt

1 t ground cinnamon

1 t ground allspice

¼ C currents or Raisins

1 large egg, lightly beaten

2 T cornstarch or arrowroot

1 Quart yogurt full-fat preferably

1 T crumbled dried mint

¼  cup olive oil extra virgin

Shopping list for:  Potatoes Yiachni

3 cloves of garlic

4 ripe tomatoes or 14 oz canned San Marzano tomatoes

6 oz kalamata olives, pitted

4 tablespoons olive oil , plus extra to serve

1 teaspoon dried oregano , plus extra to serve

3 fresh bay leaves

1 tablespoon tomato purée

feta cheese

Shopping list for ALL RECIPES:

3 cloves of garlic

4 ripe tomatoes or 14 oz canned San Marzano tomatoes

6 oz kalamata olives, pitted

4 tablespoons olive oil , plus extra to serve

1 teaspoon dried oregano , plus extra to serve

3 fresh bay leaves

1 tablespoon tomato purée

12 oz. of feta cheese

½  pound ground lamb or turkey

½  cup medium-grain rice or Italian arborio rice

8 garlic cloves

1 t ground cinnamon

1 t ground allspice

¼ C currents or Raisins

1 large egg, lightly beaten

2 T cornstarch or arrowroot

1 Quart yogurt, full-fat preferably

1 T crumbled dried mint

¼  cup olive oil extra virgin

2 Lemons

¼ C olive oil

½ Chopped Parsley

½ Chopped Mint

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Mediterranean Goddess Greens With Feta

From CSA Member Paige B.

 

1 bunch Chard, sliced thinly with stem removed

1 bunch Collards, sliced thinly with stem removed

Radish Tops & Turnip Tops - TOO Use the whole box..

1 bulb fennel, sliced.  Tops reserved for garnish

1 Lemon Juiced, zest reserved

4 cloves garlic

¼ C olive oil

4 oz. Feta packed in water, Bulgarian is awesome

½ Chopped Parsley

½ Chopped Mint

½ Chopped Fennel Tops from Bulb

Zest of Lemon

 

Heat oil in large Sauté pan over low-medium heat place smashed garlic cloves in oil and slowly fry until lightly browned.  Remove garlic from oil and set aside, don’t over brown - you’ll be using these later in the recipe.

Place fennel in pan and sauté over medium heat until lightly brown. Add greens to pan and add ½ cup water or chicken stock.  Cook until tender, using the lid to capture heat and help it cook evenly.  If you happen to have some tomato juice around this is a great place to use it as it makes the whole thing a little sweet. 

Remove from heat and juice of 1 lemon and place in service bowl.  Mix 2 T olive oil, herbs, fennel tops, lemon zest, feta and browned garlic cloves together in a small mixing bowl.  You may want to smash the garlic a little first for a smooth paste with the Olive Oil. 

Crumble the feta mixture over the greens and top with toasted Panko Bread Crumbs if you like a little extra texture.

Potatoes Yiachni

by Jamie Oliver

 

1 onion

3 cloves of garlic

1 ½ pounds potatoes

4 ripe tomatoes or 14 oz canned San Marzano tomatoes

6 oz kalamata olives, pitted

4 tablespoons olive oil , plus extra to serve

1 teaspoon dried oregano , plus extra to serve

3 fresh bay leaves

1 tablespoon tomato purée

feta cheese

 

Peel and slice the onion, peel and finely slice the garlic, and quarter the potatoes. If using fresh, quarter the tomatoes. Pit the olives.

Heat the oil in a large saucepan over a medium heat and sauté the onion, oregano and garlic for 4 to 5 minutes, or until softened. Season generously.

Add the potatoes, tomatoes (breaking them up with a spoon, if using tinned), bay leaves and tomato purée to the pan and stir well. Add enough water to just cover the mixture and then simmer, covered, over a low heat for 20 to 30 minutes.

Remove the lid, add the olives and continue to cook, stirring occasionally, for 10 minutes, or until the sauce has thickened and the potatoes are tender.

Serve hot or at room temperature with a slab of feta and a sprinkling of oregano and a drizzle of oil, or as a side to grilled poultry.

Lebanese Zucchini Stuffed with Lamb

From CSA Member Paige B.

3 Eight Ball Zucchini

½  pound ground lamb or turkey

½  cup medium-grain rice or Italian arborio rice

3 white turnips, small dice

4 garlic cloves, mashed with a tsp salt

1 t ground cinnamon

1 t ground allspice

¼ C currents or Raisins

1 ½  tsp salt to taste

½  tsp freshly ground black pepper

1 large egg, lightly beaten

2 T cornstarch or arrowroot

1 Quart yogurt full-fat preferably

1 T crumbled dried mint

¼  cup olive oil extra virgin

Gently wash and dry the zucchini. Place them in a bowl and have another (smaller) bowl handy. Dig out the center of them by removing the flesh and placing it in the smaller bowl. Try not to break the zucchini and get all the flesh out so that the shells are very thin. 

With medium heat sauté ½ garlic, onion, turnips and chopped zucchini flesh until onions are translucent.  Add ground meat and cook until slightly brown.  Remove from heat and allow to cool, add remaining garlic, spices, rice and currents.

Fill the zucchinis with the stuffing until they are almost but not quite full; you should allow some room for the rice to expand. Place the zucchinis in a pyrex and cover them with a mixture of cold water/chicken stock and rill till full just ½ the way up the pan; cover with parchment paper and then with heavy aluminum foil. Cook at 350 in the oven until the stuffing has expanded and is cooked, 30-45 minutes.

Meanwhile, you can cook the yogurt. Pour it all in a deep pan, add the beaten egg adn diluted cornstarch (in 1/4 cup water) and start heating it and stirring with a wooden spoon in the same direction until the yogurt is cooked and steams, about 15 minutes (or longer if needed) When the zucchinis are cooked in the broth, drain them, save the broth for a soup.

Before serving, fry gently some mashed garlic in olive oil in a small skillet, add about a tablespoon of dried mint and mix it until the fragrance is released. Stir this mint pesto into the yogurt for service.

Not So Green Garlic

Many of you have noticed our green garlic was becoming not so green the last two weeks it was in the boxes. The green garlic is basically the young garlic plant before the bulb is planted. 

Our garlic is planted in October and as it begins a more vigorous growth, we thin the plants. Thinning allows the garlic bulbs more room to fill out. We harvest the ‘green garlic,’ which is still edible and contains a milder garlic flavor. The garlic bulbs are ready to harvest once the tops of the plant begin to yellow and dry out. 

We will soon start digging up the bulbs and allow them to cure. Then they can be stored and used through the winter months, while we prepare to plant next year’s crop. We will be braiding garlic in two weeks at the Solstice Sleepover. Braided garlic allows the garlic to be stored longer and is also very aesthetically pleasing. Join us at the Solstice Sleepover to learn how to braid garlic and spend a relaxing weekend with us at the farm celebrating the start of summer.

Coming Together

It is quite remarkable how everything seems to come together on the farm. This last weekend was our annual Lavender Harvest. If you have never attended this weekend event and are the least bit interested, we highly recommend joining next year. While it’s a weekend of working in the field, you are surrounded by beautiful views, the calming scent of the lavender field, and wonderful company.  

We tend to get very anxious prior to the events, checking the attendee list to make sure we have enough people and updating checklists with items to remember to purchase and tasks to complete. We also obsessively monitor the weather forecast for the event weekends. It is hard to stay motivated in the fields when it is hot on the farm. 

As it seems to go with events on the farm, everything came together in the end. We had members, friends, family, and staff of the farm all join to help out. We had help from Bay Leaf Kitchen prepping and cooking meals for our work crew. Nigel and Lorraine had family visiting, and we had his son’s planning and carrying out the logistics of the day. 

His parents and daughter worked non-stop cleaning the house and dishes after the meals. Nigel’s brother was all over the farm taking incredible photos of the day’s events. We had our entire farm community out in the fields and in the drying room working extremely hard. We also have to mention, we had gorgeous weather this last weekend to be working outside, clouds with temperatures in the 70s. The rain even held off until we were finished working and all inside eating lunch. Yes, we had rain in June, but it all worked out.

We can’t thank everyone enough for their time and commitment over the weekend. We couldn’t do what we do without our entire farm family coming together.

THIS WEEK'S BOX: JUNE 12TH- JUNE 18TH

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Apricots or Strawberries- Set the bag out at room temperature, away from direct sunlight, heat, or moisture. Do not rinse until ready to eat. Use them within 2-3 days.

*Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.

Peaches- Peaches are climacteric, which means they continue to ripen after picking and should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. After ripe, refrigerate as necessary to prevent spoiling. Will last up to a week.  

*Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in the fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

Lettuce - Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week. 

*Red Kale- These luscious green leaves are a great source of beta-carotene, vitamin C, and calcium.  The colder it gets, the more frost we have, the darker the color in the leaves, and the sweeter they become. Store in the fridge and wash well. Should last about a week.

*Basil - Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week.

Parsley (THURSDAY ONLY)- Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

Zucchini (WEDNESDAY ONLY)- Store zucchini unwashed in a perforated or loosely closed plastic bag for up to one week. Don't wash or cut up the zucchini until ready to use. To freeze zucchini for later use, wash and cut into 1-inch chunks before freezing in a zipper-topped freezer bag.

Radish- Store radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator and they should keep for at least a week. If your radishes have leaves attached, it is best to remove them, as they tend to leach moisture from the root.

Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

Potatoes- Store in a cool, dry, dark place. Should keep for a week or more easily. If you want to store them for longer, say 2 or 3 months, keep them between 45-55 degrees, again in a dry place out of the light.

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Black Rice and Soy Salad With Asian Dressing

Grilled Cabbage Wedges with Spicy Lime Dressing

Zucchini Cake With Ginger and Hazelnuts

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Black Rice and Soy Salad With Asian Dressing

3 cups cooked black rice 1 cup uncooked

1 red bell pepper, diced

⅓ cup walnut pieces

1 cup edamame, thawed

½ pound tofu

1 tablespoon soy sauce

2 tablespoons minced chives

¼ cup chopped cilantro

½ to ⅔ cup (to taste) sesame ginger vinaigrette

Shopping list for: Grilled Cabbage Wedges with Spicy Lime Dressing

1/4 cup lime juice (from about 3 limes)

1/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon fish sauce (suggested: Red Boat Fish Sauce)

2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

1/4 cup cilantro leaves

1/2 teaspoon cayenne

1/4 teaspoon sugar

Grapeseed or canola oil

Shopping list for: Zucchini Cake With Ginger and Hazelnuts

2 cups flour, using the Eatwell Heirloom flour will produce a superior product that is a touch more hearty!

1 teaspoon baking soda

¾ teaspoon baking powder

1 ¼ cups sugar

2 large eggs

½ cup vegetable oil

⅓ cup orange juice

2 teaspoons orange zest

2 teaspoons peeled, grated ginger root

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

½ cup finely chopped hazelnuts

Shopping list for All Recipes

3 cups cooked black rice 1 cup uncooked

1 red bell pepper, diced

⅓ cup walnut pieces

1 cup edamame, thawed

½ pound tofu

1 tablespoon soy sauce

2 tablespoons minced chives

1/2 cup of cilantro

½ to ⅔ cup (to taste) sesame ginger vinaigrette

1/4 cup lime juice (from about 3 limes)

3/4 cup extra-virgin olive oil

1 teaspoon fish sauce (suggested: Red Boat Fish Sauce)

2 cloves garlic, roughly chopped

1/2 teaspoon cayenne

1 1/4 cups + 1/4 teaspoon sugar

Grapeseed or canola oil

2 cups flour or Eatwell Heirloom flour 

1 teaspoon baking soda

¾ teaspoon baking powder

2 large eggs

⅓ cup orange juice

2 teaspoons orange zest

2 teaspoons peeled, grated ginger root

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

½ cup finely chopped hazelnuts

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Zucchini Cake With Ginger and Hazelnuts

Having grown up with summers full of Zucchini Bread I crave it at times, however the cloyingly sweet versions of my youth have grown tired over the years.  This Molly O’Neill version is the grown up flavorful & sophisticated version you should be looking for!

2 cups flour, using the Eatwell Heirloom flour will produce a superior product that is a touch more hearty!

1 teaspoon baking soda

¾ teaspoon baking powder

½ teaspoon salt

1 ¼ cups sugar

2 large eggs

½ cup vegetable oil

⅓ cup orange juice

2 teaspoons orange zest

2 teaspoons peeled, grated ginger root

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

1 ½ cups grated zucchini

½ cup finely chopped hazelnuts

Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Sift the flour, baking soda, baking powder and salt into a large bowl. Stir in the sugar. In another bowl, whisk together the eggs, oil, orange juice, zest, ginger and vanilla. Pour the wet ingredients into the bowl with the flour and stir until just combined. Fold in the zucchini and hazelnuts.

Butter and flour a tube pan. Scrape the batter into the pan and bake until a toothpick inserted into the center of the cake comes out clean, about 45 minutes. Cool the cake in the pan for 10 minutes. Remove from the pan and cool completely on a wire rack. Slice and serve.

 

Black Rice and Soy Salad With Asian Dressing

Adapted by Paige from NYT

3 cups cooked black rice 1 cup uncooked

1 red bell pepper, diced

1 fennel head, sliced

1 onion, sliced

⅓ cup walnut pieces

1 cup edamame, thawed

½ pound tofu

1 tablespoon soy sauce

2 tablespoons minced chives

¼ cup chopped cilantro

½ to ⅔ cup (to taste) sesame ginger vinaigrette

Toss together Red Bell Pepper, Fennel, Onion, tofu & chopped Kale with ginger, soy, canola oil, sesame oil salt & pepper to taste. A little bit of sambal olek will take the flavor a long way here too! Roast in the oven at 350 for 15-18 minutes. 

In a large bowl, combine the rice, roasted veggie mixture, walnut pieces, edamame, chives and cilantro.

Just before serving, toss with the vinaigrette.  You can use a favorite asian style sesame-ginger vinaigrette!   This whole meal comes together with minimal watching and cooking!  As the rice can be made days ahead and stored in the fridge until used.  It also keeps really nicely for packed lunches at work!  I serve this with the hot bbq cabbage for a tasty full summer meal!

 

 

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