Annual Tomato Dinner At Millenium

For years now, Eric Tucker, the amazing chef/owner at Millenium, brings his team up to the farm to taste, select and pick tomatoes and other goodies from the farm for their Tomato Dinner.  This year’s dinner is August 24th and part of the proceeds will go to help support the Nigel Walker Care Share Fund.  I will definitely be there with a big group of family and friends. I would love to see lots and lots of our CSA members as well.  If you have never had the chance to enjoy a meal at Millenium, let me tell you it is an extraordinary experience.  This dinner is particularly amazing, 5 courses all featuring our tomatoes.  It takes incredible imagination and talent to create an innovative, delicious meal, each course featuring the tomato, and vegan to boot.  Each year, it is one of the best meals I have ever enjoyed.  Millenium is very conveniently located in Rockridge, just two blocks from the Rockridge BART station, and if you have to drive, parking is not impossible.  I will be down there by 5:30 to set up a nice display of tomatoes and CSA goodies.  Make a reservation, enjoy a fantastic meal, help support our Care Share fund, and please come by the farmer table to say hi!

 

Eatwell is Now On Slack

At our last Sauce Party a couple of members told me the only reason they made it up was because their roommate has a car.  I remember at farm events years ago you would see many zip cars, which we don’t see much anymore at all. That got me thinking, does that mean many of you have no way of getting up here?  And that brought me to the idea of setting up a Slack group for the Eatwell CSA Community. Cameron jumped on it, it is called Eatwell’ers Community. There is a channel for “Rideshare” and another for “Recipes” and of course the general. We can add more channels if the need arises, but I think this would be an excellent way for CSA members to reach out and connect with other members as well as the farm, for dinner/recipe ideas, and hopefully to get some ride shares happening. I really want to see more of you up at the farm. We would love any ideas you might have, or feedback. Please take a look at the Friday email we sent out last week for the link or go to bit.ly/EatwellSlack. From there, you can click and join! If you can’t find it, please let me know and I can send you an invite to the group directly.  The more members to join the better the experience!

 

Connecting While Disconnecting

Last week was the final week of Bay Leaf Kitchen’s summer camp program, and we ended with teen week.  This week is the last of the Tomato Sauce Parties, the last official overnight on the farm for the year.  When I watch the kids running around the farm getting dirty, making new friends, exploring, having fun playing with sticks and old tires, eating mulberries, I realize this is type of carefree experience is almost non-existent these days.  I recently read an article on the importance and necessity for children to become bored.  It is at that time the imagination kicks in and has a chance to develop.  Bay Leaf has a pretty strict no cell phone policy, with the rare exception to take a couple of pictures on a sunset walk.  Memories can be kept in our head, they don’t always have to go into the Cloud or FB.  Two weeks ago at the Sauce Party there was one group playing games, another group set up their camp chairs on the farm road at the end of the Event Center to watch the moon come up.  They were sitting there for a couple of hours, enjoying the sky, talking, and connecting with one another, while disconnecting from today’s world.  The farm does that to people, it allows us to relax into ourselves in a way we seldom have the opportunity to do.  That is regenerative and is as important as the nutritious food the farm provides us weekly.  It is important for each of you to understand the farm is your farm, and it is here for you, it is your place to come to, to camp for a few days, to escape our hectic technic lives, it is here for you.  When you need it or want it, just let us know you want to come up so we know in advance, but seriously take advantage of your own, peaceful place to escape the crowds, find some sunshine, lounge in the shade to read a book, build a campfire in the fire pit, and breathe.

Kids Grow Up, People Move On - Market Helpers Needed

Each and every week Eatwell Farm has had a stand at CUESA’s SF Farmers Market.  Nigel was so proud of the fact that no matter what, babies being born, famers getting married, trucks breaking down, even cancer and death, our farm has never once missed a market.  I can tell you that is quite an achievement.  Many wonderful friendships have developed at our market stand.  It is a very fun day.  Yes it is work, and it is an early start on a Saturday, but so worth it. We are looking for a few new people to join us. Some of our market crew help out every week, some are regular every other week helpers.  Do you love your farm?  Food?  Lavender?  Teens are very welcome!  Send me a text if you are interested 530-554-3971.

THIS WEEK'S BOX: AUGUST 14TH- AUGUST 20TH

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Zucchini - Does fine for a few days if left out on a cool counter, even after cut. Wrap in a cloth and refrigerate for longer storage. Do not wash until ready to eat. Lasts 4-5 days.

*Basil - Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for 4-5 days.

Eggplant- Does fine left out in a cool room. Don't wash it, eggplant doesn't like any extra moisture around its leaves. For longer storage - place loose, in the crisper. Keeps 5-7 days.

Cucumber- Cucumbers can be wrapped in a moist towel in the fridge. If you’re planning on eating them within a day or two after buying them they should be fine left out in a cool room. Lasts up to a week in the fridge. 

*Peaches- Peaches are climacteric, which means they continue to ripen after picking and should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. After ripe, refrigerate as necessary to prevent spoiling. Will last up to a week.  

*Peppers- Only wash them right before you plan on eating them as moisture decreases storage time. Store in a cool room to use in a couple of days, place in the crisper if longer storage is needed. Lasts up to one week. 


Tomatoes - Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness, place in a paper bag with an apple.

Lemon Verbena- Hang in a cool and dark place. As it dries it will keep longer. Keep 1-2 weeks.

Plums- Store ripe plums in the refrigerator. This will keep them in top shape and prevent fast deterioration. Place them in an open plastic bag - not a sealed one. Plums stored in the refrigerator will last two to four weeks.

*Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

*Potatoes- Store in a cool, dry, dark place. Should keep for a week or more easily. If you want to store them for longer, say 2 or 3 months, keep them between 45-55 degrees, again in a dry place out of the light.
 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Lazy Chiles Rellenos

Summer Vegetable Lasagne

Roasted Heirloom Tomato Soup

Summer Chickpea Salad

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for Lazy Chiles Rellenos

3/4 cup Monterey Jack Cheese, grated

3 Eatwell Farm Eggs

1 cup whole Milk

1/4 tsp Paprika

Pinch of Cayenne

Shopping list for Summer Vegetable Lasagne:

1/2 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil, divided

3 TB Butter

3 TB All-purpose Flour

1 quart Whole Milk

2 oz fresh grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

Shopping list for Roasted Heirloom Tomato Soup:

Good Olive Oil

Cream or Creme Fraiche

Shopping list for Summer Chickpea Salad:

1 Lemon

3 TB Walnut Oil, I like our local Glashoff Farms

1 can organic Chickpeas

1/4 cup fresh Parsley, chopped

Crumbled Feta Cheese, to taste

Shopping list for All Recipes:

3/4 cup Monterey Jack Cheese, grated

3 Eatwell Farm Eggs

1/4 tsp Paprika

Pinch of Cayenne

1 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

3 TB Butter

3 TB All-purpose Flour

1 Cup + 1 QT. Whole Milk

2 oz fresh grated Parmigiano-Reggiano cheese

Cream or Creme Fraiche

1 Lemon

3 TB Walnut Oil, I like our local Glashoff Farms 

1 can organic Chickpeas

1/4 cup fresh Parsley, chopped

Crumbled Feta Cheese, to taste

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Roasted Heirloom Tomato Soup

We all know Heirloom Tomatoes are fantastically delicious!  However, they don’t necessarily make great sauce or soup, except when you roast them first!

Heirloom Tomatoes, core removed and thickly sliced

Shallots or Onions, sliced

Salt and Pepper

Good Olive Oil

Basil

Cream or Creme Fraiche

Preheat oven to 375 F.  Put the onion slices into a roasting dish, then top with the tomatoes.  Drizzle over a decent amount of oil, sprinkle on a bit of salt and pepper.  Roast for about an hour.  When it is done puree everything.  Adjust seasoning.  If you like you can add a bit of cream or creme fraiche and top with finely chopped basil.

 

Summer Vegetable Lasagne

Recipe by J Kenji Lopez-Alt from Serious Eats

Lasagne definitely takes a little work, but it is so delicious, even leftover!  So put the kids to work and embrace your time together in the kitchen and make a delicious meal!

1/2 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil, divided

1 1/2 lb Summer Squash, ends trimmed, thinly sliced crosswise between 1/8-1/4” thick

Good Salt

3/4 lb Eggplant, ends trimmed, thinly sliced crosswise 1/8-1/4” thick

15 no-boil Lasagna Noodles (1 box)

3 TB Butter

3 TB All-purpose Flour

1 quart Whole Mil

2 oz fresh grated Parmigiano-Regiiano cheese

1 qt Homemade Crushed Tomatoes, use slicers and heirlooms!

3/4 lb fresh Mozzarella Cheese, torn into rough chunks

Handful of Basil Leaves

In a large skillet, heat 2 TB olive oil over high heat until shimmering.  Working in batches and being sure not to crowd the pan, add zucchini/summer squash, season with salt, and cook, turning, until just tender and browned in spots, about 4 minutes per batch.  Add more oil as needed to prevent pan from drying out, and adjust heat as needed throughout to maintain a very hot, but not heavily smoking pan.  Transfer each batch to a baking sheet and spread in an even layer to cool, then transfer cooled slices to a second baking sheet or plate.  Repeat until all the squash and eggplant are lightly browned.  Place lasagna noodles in a 9x13” casserole dish and cover with hot water.  Let noodles soak while you prepare the white sauce, agitating them every few minutes to prevent sticking, about 20 minutes total.  Heat butter in a medium saucepan over medium heat until melted.  Add flour and increase heat to medium-high.  Cook, stirring butter and flour with a whisk until pale golden blond, about 1 minute.  Whisking constantly, slowly drizzle in milk.  Continue to cook, whisking frequently, until mixture comes to a boil and thickens.  Remove from heat and add Parmisiano-Reggiano.  Whisk until smooth.  Season to taste with salt. Set aside.  Season crushed tomatoes to taste with salt.  Preheat oven to 375 F and adjust rack to center position.  Transfer noodles to a clean kitchen towel or layer with paper towels to dry them.  Dry the casserole dish carefully and brush with olive oil.  Spread a thin layer of crushed tomatoes on the bottom of the baking dish.  Layer with 3 lasagna noodles.  Top with 1/4 of browned squash and eggplant, 1/5 of crushed tomatoes and 1/5 of white sauce.  Repeat layers three more times. Place the final lasagna noodles on top and spread with remaining crushed tomatoes and white sauce.  Scatter mozzarella evenly over surface and add basil leaves.  Drizzle lightly with olive oil.  Cover dish tightly with aluminum foil and place in oven.  Bake for 30 minutes, uncover, and continue baking until lightly browned on top.  Remove from oven, let rest 10 minutes, slice and serve.

Summer Chickpea Salad

An Eatwell Farmhouse Kitchen adaptation of a Jamie Oliver recipe

1 small Onion, peeled and thinly sliced

6 to 8 Lunchbox Peppers, seeded and chopped

1 basket Cherry Tomatoes, roughly chopped

1 Lemon

3 TB Walnut Oil, I like our local Glashoff Farms 

Good Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper to taste

1 can organic Chickpeas

1/4 cup fresh Parsley, chopped

1/4 cup fresh Basil, finely ripped

Crumbled Feta Cheese, to taste

Finely slice the shallot, the put into a small bowl and cover with water, a good pinch of sugar and a splash of vinegar.  Let this soak in vinegar water for a few minutes while you are working on everything else.  Mix peppers and tomatoes in a bowl and add the walnut oil, zest from the lemon, and juice from half.  Season with salt and pepper.  Jamie suggests heating the chickpeas, and mashing just a few to make the salad a bit creamy.  Add the chickpeas, basil, parsley and chopped shallot to the bowl, mix well, and allow to marinate for a little while.  Right before you serve, toss on some crumbled feta.  Taste for seasoning, adjust if necessary, serve room temp

Lazy Chiles Rellenos

From Tasty Kitchen: A Happy Recipe Community by Ree

The original recipe serves 9 so I have cut it in half to be more appropriate to the amount of peppers in your share.  The original version uses a 9 x 13, obviously it will need to be much smaller than that, you might even try a loaf pan.  I had this in the newsletter a year ago, and since then I have made it several times, twice in the last couple of weeks.  Aside from taking some time roasting the peppers, it is a very simple and quick meal and we all love it.  The last batch was a bit undercooked, but we fried up some fresh corn tortillas the next morning and scrambled the leftovers in the pan with the tortillas and enjoyed them for breakfast.  It was super delicious!

 

4 whole roasted, peeled and seeded Poblano Chiles*

3/4 cup Monterey Jack Cheese, grated

3 Eatwell Farm Eggs

1 cup whole Milk

Salt and Pepper to taste

1/4 tsp Paprika

Pinch of Cayenne

Preheat oven to 325 F.  Mix together eggs, milk, salt, pepper, paprika and cayenne.  Cut chiles in half and add a single layer of chiles on the bottom of baking dish.   Top chiles with half the grated cheese.  Repeat with another layer of chiles and another layer of cheese.  Pour egg mixture all over the top.  Place into a larger baking dish or rimmed baking sheet.  Pour in 1/2 inch of water and bake for 35 to 45 minutes, or until completely set.  Cut into squares and serve with warm corn tortillas.  *I have written about roasting peppers in the last two newsletters, but incase you missed that it is quite simple:  Clean peppers, put on a baking sheet (I like mine lined with parchment paper) and put into an oven preheated to 500F.  Roast for 10 minutes, turn peppers over and roast another 10 minutes.  Remove and immediately put into a bowl and cover tightly with cling film.  Let rest/steam/cool for about 30 minutes, remove stems, peel, seed and you are good to go!

Rogue Chard

We found an enormous chard plant growing in the middle of the peppers. Not sure if it is just a remnant from an earlier planting or perhaps a few seeds jumped into the the pepper seed bag. Either way, we find it amusing and thought I would share it with y’all. Out on the farm, life is something you just can’t stop as is proven to us by this gigantic chard.

 

Looking To Fall and Beyond

Walking the farm recently we came across a partial field of Celeriac. At first glance, it is hard to distinguish these young plants from celery, but when you get up close you can see the root bulb. It is hard to imagine during these very hot days that I will enjoy a delicious, roasted celeriac. But before you know it, the season will change, the days will get colder and shorter and certainly, that comforting cold weather food will be thoroughly enjoyed. For the moment though they are a reminder of what’s to come, as well as the weight of all I don’t know.

 Nigel juggled a lot of things in his head - seriously a lot. It is truly daunting.  How we wish we had had just a little more time together so we could ask him about a million questions, but alas that possibility is no more. We are working on a seed list, a Headstart list, and a harvest list, praying we aren’t missing anything important. It is what keeps me awake at night, the not knowing, but seeing celeriac in the ground is rather comforting.  And we will keep plodding along with our giant lists.

 

The Pond

Many of you who have visited the farm this summer have asked about the pond.  It is dry, dry, dry.  And yes, we did that on purpose. A few years ago Nigel was reading up on ways to seal a pond naturally. We have already put a pond liner, and used clay, but nothing has worked for us. The fact is we have no clay in our soil, a bit of a problem when you are looking to seal a pond! What he read was the goose and duck poop does a very good job of sealing ponds, so we got geese and ducks.  The pond still leaks. But now the water is yucky and no one wants to swim in it anymore.  I decided to let it drain and dry out completely. I am hoping to fill it up in a week or so and keeping my fingers crossed that it seals or at the very least we will have clear water, beautiful enough to swim in.

Poblano Peppers?

Here’s the thing about peppers, there is no true marker for spicy, therefore what is a hot pepper to one person is a mild pepper to someone else. I love the poblanos, but for many people, they are too hot.  This creates a problem when it comes to deciding whether or not to put them into the share, do we or don’t we?  And of course those of you who don’t mind the heat will tell me they aren’t hot at all, and those of you who have a low tolerance for spice will tell me they are WAY too hot.  I’m not sure how much we have planted and if we will have enough to go into the boxes, but how about a compromise?  We add them to the add on’s list and if you love them you can order them as an extra.  We will check with Jose and find out if we have enough to put into the boxes for at least two weeks.  If we do I will consider that.  It would help to get your feedback though, sooooo let’s have a vote, text me yay or nay on Poblanos and we will take it from there, 530-554-3971.

This Week's Box: August 7th- August 13th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Zucchini - Does fine for a few days if left out on a cool counter, even after cut. Wrap in a cloth and refrigerate for longer storage. Do not wash until ready to eat. Lasts 4-5 days.

Basil - Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for 4-5 days.

*Eggplant- Does fine left out in a cool room. Don't wash it, eggplant doesn't like any extra moisture around its leaves. For longer storage - place loose, in the crisper. Keeps 5-7 days.

Cucumber- Cucumbers can be wrapped in a moist towel in the fridge. If you’re planning on eating them within a day or two after buying them they should be fine left out in a cool room. Lasts up to a week in the fridge. 

Peaches- Peaches are climacteric, which means they continue to ripen after picking and should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. After ripe, refrigerate as necessary to prevent spoiling. Will last up to a week.  

Peppers- Only wash them right before you plan on eating them as moisture decreases storage time. Store in a cool room to use in a couple of days, place in the crisper if longer storage is needed. Lasts up to one week. 


*Tomatoes - Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness, place in a paper bag with an apple.

Lemon Verbena- Hang in a cool and dark place. As it dries it will keep longer. Keep 1-2 weeks.

*Plums- Store ripe plums in the refrigerator. This will keep them in top shape and prevent fast deterioration. Place them in an open plastic bag - not a sealed one. Plums stored in the refrigerator will last two to four weeks.

*Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

*Potatoes- Store in a cool, dry, dark place. Should keep for a week or more easily. If you want to store them for longer, say 2 or 3 months, keep them between 45-55 degrees, again in a dry place out of the light.
 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Tangy Cucumber Avocado Salad

Salbitxada Sauce

Moussaka

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Tangy Cucumber Avocado Salad

1 large Avocado

1 small clove Garlic

Juice from 1/4Lemon and 1/2 Lime

Shopping list for: Salbitxada Sauce

2 TB whole Almonds

1/2 Serrano Chile

6 cloves Garlic

Zest of 1/2 Lemon

2 TB thinly sliced Italian Parsley

1 TB Sherry Vinegar

Olive Oil

Shopping list for: Moussaka

3 Garlic cloves

1 tsp Italian Seasoning

2-3 sprigs fresh Mint

2 Bay Leaves

1 tsp Cinnamon

5 TB All Purpose Flour

7 oz Red Wine

7 TB Olive Oil

4 TB Butter

14 oz Milk

1 tsp grated Nutmeg

1 oz grated Parmesan

1 Egg

Shopping list for All Recipes: 

1 large Avocado

2 Lemons

1 Lime

10 Garlic cloves

1 tsp Italian Seasoning

2-3 sprigs fresh Mint

2 Bay Leaves

1 tsp Cinnamon

5 TB All Purpose Flour

7 oz Red Wine

9 TB Olive Oil

4 TB Butter

14 oz Milk

1 tsp grated Nutmeg

1 oz grated Parmesan

1 Egg

2 TB whole Almonds

1/2 Serrano Chile

2 TB Italian Parsley

1 TB Sherry Vinegar

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Tangy Cucumber Avocado Salad

Recipe Eatwell Farmhouse Kitchen, inspired by a recipe by Jessie Welch found on allrecipes.com

2 medium Cucumbers, cubes

1 large Avocado, cubed

1 small clove Garlic, minced

1/2 small Onion, minced

3 to 5 fresh Lemon Verbena leaves, we used 3 but definitely felt it could handle more, finely chopped

3 big Basil leaves, finely chopped

Pinch of Salt to start, add more if you like

Black Pepper to taste

Juice from 1/4Lemon and 1/2 Lime

 

Combine all the ingredients except for the avocado, and mix well. Then, add the avocado and mix it int.  Cover and refrigerate at least 30 minutes before serving.

Moussaka

Recipe by Lilly, inspired by a recipe found on BBC

 

Lilly offered to cook dinner the other night, and thinking of everything that was in the share last week, I asked if she was game for trying out a Moussaka.  She was, she did and it was AMAZING!  I had thirds, almost went for a fourth serving, Cameron did have four servings, and by the end of the meal there was very little left over.  All of us wanted the leftovers for lunch the next day.  I am definitely making this again very soon, it was that good.  Traditionally Moussaka is made with ground lamb and includes potatoes.  I am not the biggest fan of lamb, plus we have access to amazing pork, so she made it with ground pork, and we served steamed potatoes on the side.  Typically this dish uses more eggplant, so if you have one leftover from last week you can use two.  If you want more veg in it, fry up some of the summer squash.  When Lilly made her version there wasn’t enough to do multiple layers, so she did one layer of meat, one of eggplant, another layer using the rest of the meat, then topped it with the sauce.

 

1 Eggplant, cut into 1/2” slices

1 TB fine Sea Salt

1 lb Ground Pork, you can use Lamb which is how this is traditionally made

1 Onion, finely chopped

3 Garlic cloves, crushed

1 tsp Italian Seasoning

2-3 sprigs fresh Mint

2 Bay Leaves

1 tsp Cinnamon

1 TB All Purpose Flour

1/2 tsp Sea Salt, plus extra for seasoning

7 oz Red Wine

1 lb chopped Red Slicer Tomatoes

7 TB Olive Oil

Sea Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

 

Place the eggplant pieces in a colander and sprinkle with salt.  Set aside for 10 minutes.  Put the ground pork, onions, garlic, Italian Seasoning, mint, bay leaves and cinnamon in a large heavy-based frying pan and cook over a medium heat for 10 minutes, stirring with a wooden spoon to break up the meat.  Stir in the flour, salt and plenty of freshly ground black pepper.  Add the wine, tomatoes and bring to a simmer.   Cook for 30 minutes, stirring occasionally until the meat is tender and the sauce has thickened.  Season with salt and pepper to taste.   Getting back to the eggplant, rinse the pieces under cold running water and pat dry.  Heat three TB of the oil in a skillet and fry the eggplant pieces for 2 to 3 minutes on each side on medium high heat.  Add more oil when you need to.  Drain the eggplant on paper towels.  Preheat the oven to350 F.

 

For the White Sauce

4 TB Butter

4 TB All-Purpose Flour

14 oz Milk

1 tsp grated Nutmeg

1 oz grated Parmesan

1 Egg, beaten

 

Melt the butter in a saucepan, then stir in the flour.  Cook for a few second then slowly whisk in the milk.  Add half of the parmesan and the grated nutmeg.  Simmer the sauce on gently for 4 to 5 minutes, stirring regularly.  Season to taste with salt and pepper.  Remove the sauce from the heat then whisk in the egg.  Spread out half of the meat sauce in the bottom of the baking dish.  Next is the eggplant, then the rest of the meat sauce.  Cover with the white sauce, spreading it around to make sure it is all covered.  Top with the rest of the parmesan cheese and bake in the preheated oven for 45 minutes or until bubbling anddeep golden brown.

Serve.

Salbitxada Sauce

Recipe found on LA Times, adapted from a recipe by Jose Centeno

This sauce tastes great with Summer Squash garnished with toasted almonds.

2 TB whole Almonds

1/2 Serrano Chile, seeded, diced

6 cloves Garlic, minced

2 ripe Tomatoes, cored, seeded and diced

Zest of 1/2 Lemon

2 TB thinly sliced Italian Parsley

1 TB Sherry Vinegar

Olive Oil

Kosher Salt

Freshly ground Pepper

 

Toast almonds in a sauté pan over medium-high, shaking frequently, until golden and fragrant, about 5 minutes.  Combine the almonds, chile, garlic, tomatoes, lemon, parsley, vinegar and one-half cup olive oil in a medium bowl.  Season with 1/4 tsp salt and a couple grinds of black pepper, or to taste, and adjust consistency with additional olive oil if desired.  This will keep for two days, refrigerated.

THIS WEEK'S BOX: JULY 31ST - AUGUST 6TH

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Zucchini - Does fine for a few days if left out on a cool counter, even after cut. Wrap in a cloth and refrigerate for longer storage. Do not wash until ready to eat. Lasts 4-5 days.

Basil - Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for 4-5 days.

*Eggplant- Does fine left out in a cool room. Don't wash it, eggplant doesn't like any extra moisture around its leaves. For longer storage - place loose, in the crisper. Keeps 5-7 days.

Cucumber- Cucumbers can be wrapped in a moist towel in the fridge. If you’re planning on eating them within a day or two after buying them they should be fine left out in a cool room. Lasts up to a week in the fridge. 

Peaches- Peaches are climacteric, which means they continue to ripen after picking and should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. After ripe, refrigerate as necessary to prevent spoiling. Will last up to a week.  

*Rosemary- Wrap in a damp paper towel and store in a plastic bag in the fridge. Lasts one week or more. To dry, leave bound around the stems and hang - last 2 weeks to a month.

*Tomatoes - Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness, place in a paper bag with an apple.

*Plums- Store ripe plums in the refrigerator. This will keep them in top shape and prevent fast deterioration. Place them in an open plastic bag - not a sealed one. Plums stored in the refrigerator will last two to four weeks.

*Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

*Potatoes- Store in a cool, dry, dark place. Should keep for a week or more easily. If you want to store them for longer, say 2 or 3 months, keep them between 45-55 degrees, again in a dry place out of the light.
 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Creamy Courgette with Tarragon Cream

Roasted Eggplant with Saffron Yogurt Sauce

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Creamy Courgette with Tarragon Cream

4 TB Olive Oil

8 TB Butter

5 cloves Garlic, thinly sliced

1 oz Tarragon

1/3 cup grated Parmesan Reggiano

1/4 tsp freshly ground Nutmeg

1 Egg, beaten

2 oz Walnuts, roughly chopped

Shopping list for: Roasted Eggplant with Saffron Yogurt Sauce

1 TB toasted Pine Nuts

Pomegranate Seeds

A small pinch of Saffron Strands

6 or 7 oz of Greek Yogurt

1 clove Garlic, crushes

2 1/2 tsp Lemon Juice

3 TB Olive Oil

Shopping list for All Recipes: 

1 TB toasted Pine Nuts

Pomegranate Seeds

A small pinch of Saffron Strands

6 or 7 oz of Greek Yogurt

6 cloves Garlic

2 1/2 tsp Lemon Juice

7 TB Olive Oil

8 TB Butter

1 oz Tarragon

1/3 cup grated Parmesan Reggiano

1/4 tsp freshly ground Nutmeg

1 Egg, beaten

2 oz Walnuts, roughly chopped

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Creamy Courgette with Tarragon Cream

Soooo my hero, Yotam, always comes through!  He recently did an article for the Guardian of Zucchini recipes.  Courgette is what the English call Zucchini.  Yotam Ottolenghi, as many of you know, is one of my all time favorite chefs and most definitely one I turn to all summer long.  I am hoping we can make this tonight.  Since we have basil in the box I am planning on doubling thebasil cream and omitting thetarragon.

 

4 TB Olive Oil

8 TB Butter

5 cloves Garlic, thinly slice

*10 Courgettes (zucchini), trimmed, and thinly sliced

Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

1 oz Basil leaves

1 oz Tarragon

*3 large potatoes, peeled and cut into chunks

7 TB whole Milk

1/3 cup grated Parmesan Reggiano

1/4 tsp freshly ground Nutmeg

1 Egg, beaten

2 oz Walnuts, roughly chopped

Heat the oven to 390 F.  Put an extra-large sauce pan for which you have a lid, on a medium-high heat, and melt the oils and 3 TB of the butter.  Once the butter start to foam, fry the garlic for a minute or two, just until it starts to brown.  Stir in the courgettes, a teaspoon and a half of salt and plenty of pepper, and cook for seven to eight minutes, until the courgettes have shrunk a little and started to take on some color.  Turn down the heat to medium-low, cover and leave to simmer gently for 40 minutes, stirring every once in a while, until the courgettes are completely soft and breaking apart.  Stir int he herbs, then spoon the mix in to a 20cm X 30 cm (8 x 12”) ceramic baking dish.  While the courgettes are cooking, bring a medium saucepan of salted water to a boil. Drop int e potatoes and boil for 17-18 minutes, until cooked through, then drain.  Return the potatoes to the pan with 2 TB butter, the milk, parmesan, nutmeg, egg and half a tsp salt, then mash until very smooth.  Spoon the mash into a piping bag, then pipe cycles of mash over the top of the zucchini mix, to cover it completely; make sure the circle sit close together, but stay distinct from each other.  And don’t worry if you don’t have a piping bag; use two tablespoons to shape the mash, spoon follow on the zucchini and level out the top with a palette knife or spatula.  Melt 1 TB butter in a small saucepan, brush this all over the top of the mash, then bake the cobbler for 30 minutes, until the potato is golden-brown and the zucchini underneath is bubbling.  Remove from the oven and leave to rest for five minutes.  Melt the remaining butter in the saucepan until it starts to froth, cook until it darkens and smells nutty.  Stir in the walnuts for just 10 seconds, spoon all over the cobbler and serve.

Roasted Eggplant with Saffron Yogurt Sauce

Recipe by Yotam Ottolenghi from Ottolenghi

 

This is one of my all time favorite go to recipes.  I love roasted eggplant, but the yogurt sauce is good with a wide variety of roasted vegetables.  Yotam’s recipe is for 3 medium sized eggplant, which clearly we do not have in the box.  I would recommend making the full proportions of sauce, you can use it on fish, zucchini, tomatoes, just about anything.  I have altered the eggplant proportions already.

 

1 Eggplant, cut into 1/2” slices

Olive Oil for brushing

1 TB toasted Pine Nuts

Pomegranate Seeds

7 Basil Leave

Coarse Sea Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

Preheat the oven to 425 F.  Place the eggplant slices on a roasting tray, brush with plenty of olive oil on both sides and sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Roast for 20 to 35 minutes, until the slices take on a beautiful light brown color.  Let them cool down.  The eggplants will keep int he fridge for 3 days; just let them come to room temp before serving.  

 

Saffron Yogurt Sauce

A small pinch of Saffron Strands

3 TB hot Water

6 or 7 oz of Greek Yogurt

1 clove Garlic, crushes

2 1/2 tsp Lemon Juice

3 TB Olive Oil

Infuse the saffron in the hot water in a small bowl for 5 minutes.  Pour the infusion into a bowl containing the yogurt, garlic, lemon juice, olive oil and some salt.  Whisk well to get a smooth, golden sauce.  Taste and adjust the salt, if necessary, then chill.  This sauce will keep well in the fridge for up to 3 days.  

 

To serve, arrange the eggplant slices on a large plate, slightly overlapping.  Drizzle the saffron yogurt over them, sprinkle with the pine nuts and pomegranate seeds and lay the basil on top.

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