A Very Grand Thanksgiving

Just a quick note to say thank you to all the friends and family who celebrated our favorite holiday with us.  Nigel and I knew he was going back into UCSF on the Saturday right after, so it was really special for us to have 20 people around the table, celebrating the harvest and our friendships.  As is always the case when we do TDay on the farm, my favorite part is going out together to harvest some of what will end up on the table.  This year we had a long stop in the strawberries, wowing over the fact that it is nearly the end of November and we were enjoying delicious berries!  When our entire group gathered the whole way around my kitchen center island to share a moment of thanks I knew my day was complete.  I hope you all enjoyed your celebration as much as we did!

This Week's Box: November 28th - December 3rd

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

Mandarins [or Persimmons (Twin Girl's)]- They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator.

Spinach - Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

Collards - Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last 3-5 days.

Persimmons [(Twin Girl's) or Mandarins] - Store at room temperature until ripe, then refrigerate in a plastic bag. Lasts several days once ripe.

Arugula - Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

Mizuna - Mizuna will keep in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. Rinse and dry the leaves before refrigerating. Wrap them in a paper towel and store them in a plastic bag.

Fennel - If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.

Stir Fry Mix - These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

Radishes - Store radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator and they should keep for at least a week. If your radishes have leaves attached, it is best to remove them, as they tend to leach moisture from the root.

Cabbage - Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week.

Squash - Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Many growers say winter squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

Apples (Hidden Star Orchards) - Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months. 

Onions - Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Hearty Greens Salad with Turmeric, Carrot & Miso Dressing

One-Pot Mujadara with Leeks and Greens

Roasted Chicken with Potatoes, Arugula and Garlic Yogurt

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Hearty Greens Salad with Turmeric, Carrot & Miso Dressing

¼ cup peanut oil or neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn

¼ cup seasoned rice vinegar

3 tablespoons mild or sweet miso, like yellow or white

1 tablespoon dark sesame oil

2 medium carrots, roughly chopped

1 inch long piece fresh ginger, cut into coins

½ inch piece of fresh Turmeric or 2 t Ground turmeric

1 t sambal oelek or other asian hot sauce

Shopping list for: One-Pot Mujadara with Leeks and Greens

1 cup brown or green lentils

2 leeks, white and light green parts only, roots trimmed

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

3 garlic cloves, minced

¾ cup long-grain rice

½ T ground cumin

½ teaspoon ground allspice

¼ teaspoon cayenne

1 bay leaf

1 cinnamon stick

Shopping list for: Roasted Chicken with Potatoes, Arugula and Garlic Yogurt

1 ½ pounds chicken thighs and drumsticks

3 tablespoons harissa (or use another thick hot sauce, such as sriracha)

1 teaspoon ground cumin

4 ½ tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, more as needed

2 leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced

1 teaspoon lemon zest (from 1 lemon)

½ cup plain yogurt (do not use Greek yogurt)

1 small garlic clove

 Chopped fresh dill or parsley,  as needed

 Lemon juice, as needed

Shopping list for all recipes:

¼ cup peanut oil or neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn

¼ cup seasoned rice vinegar

3 tablespoons mild or sweet miso, like yellow or white

1 tablespoon dark sesame oil

2 medium carrots, roughly chopped

1 inch long piece fresh ginger, cut into coins

½ inch piece of fresh Turmeric or 2 t Ground turmeric

1 t sambal oelek or other asian hot sauce

1 cup brown or green lentils

4 leeks

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

4 garlic cloves

¾ cup long-grain rice

½ T ground cumin; plus 1 tsp

½ teaspoon ground allspice

¼ teaspoon cayenne

1 bay leaf

1 cinnamon stick

1 ½ pounds chicken thighs and drumsticks

3 tablespoons harissa (or use another thick hot sauce, such as sriracha)

4 ½ tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, more as needed

1 teaspoon lemon zest (from 1 lemon); plus Lemon juice, as needed

½ cup plain yogurt (do not use Greek yogurt)

 Chopped fresh dill or parsley,  as needed

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Roasted Chicken With Potatoes, Arugula and Garlic Yogurt

adapted from Melissa Clark by Paige

1 ½ pounds chicken thighs and drumsticks

1 ¼ pounds butternut squash or sweet potatoes 

2 ½ teaspoons kosher salt, more as needed

½ teaspoon black pepper, more as needed

3 tablespoons harissa (or use another thick hot sauce, such as sriracha)

1 teaspoon ground cumin

4 ½ tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, more as needed

2 leeks, white and light green parts only, halved lengthwise and thinly sliced

1 teaspoon lemon zest (from 1 lemon)

½ cup plain yogurt (do not use Greek yogurt)

1 small garlic clove

1 bunch roughly sliced arugula

 Chopped fresh dill or parsley,  as needed

 Lemon juice, as needed

Combine chicken and potatoes in a large bowl. Season with salt and pepper. In a small bowl, whisk together harissa, cumin and 3 tablespoons oil. Pour over chicken and potatoes and toss to combine. Let stand at room temperature for 30 minutes, or up to 8 hours in the refrigerator.

Meanwhile, in a medium bowl, combine leeks, lemon zest, a pinch of salt and the remaining 1 1/2 tablespoons oil.

Heat oven to 425 degrees. Arrange chicken and potatoes on a large rimmed baking sheet in a single layer. Roast 15 minutes. Toss potatoes lightly. Scatter leeks over pan. Roast until chicken and potatoes are cooked through and everything is golden and slightly crisped, 25 to 30 minutes longer. While chicken cooks, place yogurt in a small bowl. Grate garlic over yogurt and season to taste with salt and pepper. To serve, spoon yogurt over chicken and vegetables in the pan. Scatter arugula and dill/parsley over mixture. Drizzle with oil and lemon juice and serve.

 

One-Pot Mujadara With Leeks and Greens

by Melissa Clark

1 cup brown or green lentils

2 leeks, white and light green parts only, roots trimmed

1 onion, sliced to similar size as leeks

2 ¼ teaspoons salt, more as needed

¼ cup extra-virgin olive oil

3 garlic cloves, minced

¾ cup long-grain rice

½ T ground cumin

½ teaspoon ground allspice

¼ teaspoon cayenne

1 bay leaf

1 cinnamon stick

4 cups trimmed and chopped spring greens (collards, cabbage, spinach, kale, mustard or a combination).

Place lentils in a large bowl and add warm tap water to cover by 1 inch. Let soak.

Meanwhile, halve leeks lengthwise; run under warm water to release any grit. Thinly slice leeks crosswise.

Heat oil in a Dutch oven or large pot over medium-high heat. Add leeks and onion; cook, stirring occasionally, until golden brown and crispy, 5 to 10 minutes. Transfer half the leek/onion mix to a bowl to use for garnish and sprinkle with 1/4 teaspoon salt.

Stir garlic into the pot with the remaining leeks and cook for 15 seconds until fragrant. Stir in rice and sauté 2 minutes. Stir in cumin, allspice and cayenne; sauté 30 seconds.

Drain lentils and stir into pot. Add 4 1/4 cups water, 2 teaspoons salt, bay leaf and cinnamon stick. Bring to a simmer. Cover and cook over low heat for 15 minutes. Rinse greens in a colander and spread damp leaves over lentil mixture. Cover and cook 5 minutes more, until rice and lentils are tender and greens are wilted. Remove from heat and let stand, covered, for 5 minutes. Serve sprinkled with reserved crispy leeks.

 

Hearty Greens Salad with Turmeric, Carrot & Miso Dressing

adapted from NYT by Paige

¼ cup peanut oil or neutral oil, like grapeseed or corn

¼ cup seasoned rice vinegar

3 tablespoons mild or sweet miso, like yellow or white

1 tablespoon dark sesame oil

2 medium carrots, roughly chopped

1 inch long piece fresh ginger, cut into coins

½ inch piece of fresh Turmeric or 2 t Ground turmeric

1 t sambal oelek or other asian hot sauce

 freshly ground black pepper

Put all ingredients except salt and pepper into a food processor and pulse a few times to mince carrots. Then let machine run for a minute or so, until mixture is chunky-smooth. (If you want it smoother, use a blender.) Taste and add salt and pepper to taste.

I like to use this to dress up a mix of hearty greens. I myself roughly chop raw collards; stem removed, cabbage, mizuna, cilantro, radishes.  I often add a bit of the dressing to chopped butternut, fennel, onions, and tofu - roasting them in the oven for 30 minutes @ 375.  Adding these warm roasted veggies to this hearty salad brings it full circle to delicious and is so so good for lunch the next day at work. You can also add cooked buckwheat noodles to all of the above. 

I’ve never made only a single recipe of this dressing - as it holds in the fridge for at least a week if not more.  I usually find myself making at least of quart of it at a time.

 

Thinning Fields

I enjoy having the bags of stir fry mix, it makes adding some greens to a dish super easy.  I often like to sneak a bit of finely chopped greens into dishes where you wouldn't necessarily find them, like meatloaf or sausage rolls.  The smaller, more tender leaves are really perfect.  That's my way of looking at crops - from the kitchen, but from the farm's vantage point there is a completely different reason for the Stir Fry Mix and that is to thin the rows out a bit.  As Nigel likes to say - farming is one big gamble and one of the ways you hedge your bet is by over planting.  You never know what might happen to a particular planting or a large portion of your crop. The squirrels in the pumpkins this year is a great example.  In the case of the greens, we plant more seeds than what we want in the beds, thinning them out is a necessary task. The young small plants are perfect for a bag of mixed greens.  The truth is a lot of food goes to waste on every farm, at least this is one solution that helps.  This picture above shows a tender baby bok choy.

 

Just in the Nick of Time

Most of you have read about Nigel's bananas he has planted in front of our house.  It thrills him to no end to watch them grow, see the giant bud form and open, and then watch that hand of bananas grow.  In October, when Jan and Liz were here, they helped Nigel by planting the new trees we had in pots and with the trimming of our existing tree.  That one produced bananas last year and they were delicious!  It is not easy growing bananas in regions of frost.  You want them to stay on the tree as long as possible, but you need to make sure you cut them off before the first real frost.  Last week, as the nights were growing colder, we were watching the temps closely.  Although the weather forecast was not showing actual frost Monday night, Nigel made the decision to cut the hand. Wednesday morning we woke up to a lot of frost.  I guess a farmer with years experience just knows.

 

A Time of Thanks

Hard to believe it is Thanksgiving, my favorite holiday!  Nigel and I have so much to be thankful for; the support and love of our family, and friends who we consider family, our crew who make up our big extended family, and you, our CSA family.  We are also very thankful that Nigel is getting stronger and better every day.  Although he goes back to UCSF right after Thanksgiving this week, we are focusing on and relishing the farm life we get to live. This year, we are gathering at the farm to celebrate the abundance the land brings. We will go out to harvest much of what we need for our feast and then gather in the kitchen to cook together.  There isn't much that makes me happier than having everyone working together in my kitchen.  We are attempting to scale the feast back a bit this year, but still its going to be a lot of food. Some of the farm grown highlights of our feast includes one of my all time favorite holiday dishes Collard Greens Gratin (you can find the recipe on bonappetit.com) as well as roasted butternuts, turnips with fennel and leeks.  I am thankful for this land that provides an abundance of delicious, nourishing food, and for the crew who has kept it all going this past year.  Jose does such a great job of keeping the machine that is this farm operating.  Connie has really done an amazing job, not only as the CSA manager, but the events coordinator, spokesperson for Eatwell at countless events; she has become quite the champion for Eatwell.  It is an enormous task getting the boxes out this week because of all the schedule changes to accommodate a Thursday holiday.  As I sit here on Monday morning writing my newsletter bits, I am very thankful we have a break in the rain. Even though it will be muddy out there, it is really no fun harvesting in the rain.  And since this is the week we express our thanks more than most weeks I would like to say I am most grateful for my husband who changed my world and brought me home.

The Noble Bay

Years ago, before I moved to the farm, Nigel and I drove out to the town of Tomales for a Sunday morning excursion.  After enjoying our treats at the fabulous Tomales Bakery, we walked up the street to Mostly Natives Nursery where we found true Bay Laurel.  These trees were planted at the very end of the farm.  They are looking really healthy and they have grown quite tall.  The Bay trees are a good example of a tree that disrupts the wind but also produces something we can harvest.

 

This Week's Box: November 21st - 26th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

Spinach - Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

Tokyo White Turnips - If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days.

Collards - Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last 3-5 days.

Persimmons (Twin Girl's) - Store at room temperature until ripe, then refrigerate in a plastic bag. Lasts several days once ripe.

Arugula - Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

Fennel - If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.

Dill - A delicious mediterranean herb that is well suited to our climate. Store in the fridge. Should last up to a week.

Stir Fry Mix - These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

Sage - Wrap in a damp paper towel and store in a plastic bag in the fridge. Keeps about 1 week. Can also be hung to dry and will last several months.

Celery - This is not an easy crop to grow. It requires constant water and fertility. We supply the water but the soil microfauna seems to have been able to keep up releasing nutrients as demanded by the crop. This is not an easy task. Store in your crisper. Should last up to a week.

Leeks - These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water). Will last at least a week.

Sweet Potatoes - Store in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate ‐ sweet potatoes don't like the cold. Lasts up to 3 weeks if stored properly.

Squash - Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Many growers say winter squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

Apples (Hidden Star Orchards) - Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months. 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Homemade Vegetable Stock, Meaty Stock, and Flavored Stock

Sweet Potato, Coconut & Cilantro Soup

Surprise Tokyo Turnip Side Dish

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Homemade Vegetable Stock, Meaty Stock, and Flavored Stock

8-10 garlic cloves, skin on and smashed

1 T whole peppercorns

¼ cup Olive Oil

1 large onion skin on

2 carrots

1 gallon zipper bag full of Frozen Vegetables Scraps

2 bay leaves

Some leftover fresh herbs from box (thyme, sage, rosemary)

Pinch of red pepper flakes

Meat Scraps (optional)

Flavors, such as, Jalapeño, Cumin, Thai Curry Paste, Dried Asian Chilis, Sesame oil, Ginger (optional)

Shopping list for: Sweet Potato, Coconut & Cilantro Soup

2 T Olive Oil oil

1 medium onion, chopped

1 medium carrot, chopped

2 tsp Thai curry paste (LOVE this one: http://www.thekitchn.com/product-review-mae-ploy-curry-127730)

1 liter vegetable stock

½  can coconut milk

large handful cilantro, roughly chopped

Shopping list for: Surprise Tokyo Turnip Side Dish

1-2 T Olive Oil

2 T Butter

½  Meyer Lemon, zestedJuice Reserved

Shopping list for all recipes:

8-10 garlic cloves, skin on and smashed

1 T whole peppercorns

¼ cup Olive Oil; plus 4 T Olive Oil oil

1 large onion; plus 1 medium onion, chopped

2 carrots; plus 1 medium carrot

1 gallon zipper bag full of Frozen Vegetables Scraps

2 bay leaves

Some leftover fresh herbs from box (thyme, sage, rosemary)

pinch of red pepper flakes

Meat Scraps (optional)

Flavors, such as, Jalapeño, Cumin, Thai Curry Paste, Dried Asian Chilis, Sesame oil, Ginger (optional)

2 tsp Thai curry paste (LOVE this one: http://www.thekitchn.com/product-review-mae-ploy-curry-127730)

1 liter vegetable stock

½  can coconut milk

large handful cilantro, roughly chopped

2 T Butter

½  Meyer Lemon, zestedJuice Reserved

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Surprise Tokyo Turnip Side Dish

By Paige Boger

 

When I was doing the on the spot cooking classes this was one that so many members really enjoyed.  I call it the Surprise by these MOST delicious turnips that I LOVE! 

1-2 T Olive Oil

2 T Butter

1 bunch Tokyo Turnips, washed, root removed, ¼’d or ⅛’d (bitesize) skin-on

1 leek, white (Reserve green tops for above Stock!)

½ fennel Bulb, thinly sliced - some minced fennel fronds reserved as garnish

1 bunch Arugula, washed and rough chopped

1 bunch of Turnip Tops, washed and chopped same size as arugula

1 persimmon, seeds removed and set aside as garnish

½  Meyer Lemon, zestedJuice Reserved

In a medium heat pan heat olive oil. Add sliced leaks, sliced fennel - sauté until golden brown and slightly caramelized. Add a pinch of Eatwell Farm Rosemary Salt and a pinch of fresh ground black pepper. Remove from pan and set aside.

Place Arugula & Turnip Tops in a mixing bowl, toss with 2 t olive oil and lemon juice. Pinch of salt. 

Return pan to heat and under high to medium-high heat add 2 T butter, allow butter to get HOT and lightly brown.  Keep heat HIGH, toss turnips into pan quickly moving it around and allowing the turnips to get some brown bits, cook quickly and on HIGH heat for no more than 2 minutes.  The turnips will still have some crunch in them! Add Meyer Lemon zest, fennel & leeks back into hot pan and remove from heat.  Toss Turnips, Fennel, Leeks with dressed Arugula & Turnip Tops (you could also add some kale/spinach in this mix of greens) - serve immediately with Persimmons kernels over the top as garnish.

Sweet Potato, Coconut & Cilantro Soup

by Paige Boger

2 T Olive Oil oil

1 medium onion, chopped

1 medium carrot, chopped

2 tsp Thai curry paste (LOVE this one: http://www.thekitchn.com/product-review-mae-ploy-curry-127730)

1 liter vegetable stock

½  can coconut milk

large handful cilantro, roughly chopped

1.5 # sweet potato, grated (you can substitute Butternut or other hard squash here)

salt & pepper to taste

Heat the oil in a deep heavy bottom stock pot, then soften the onion & carrot for 4-5 mins. Stir in the curry paste and cook for 1 min more until fragrant. Add the grated sweet potato and stock, then bring quickly to the boil, simmering for 10 mins until the potato is tender.

Remove the soup from the heat, stir in the coconut milk and seasoning, then cool briefly before whizzing with a stick blender until smooth. Sprinkle with cilantro and serve with the frozen TJ’s Naan bread that maybe has been hit with a little garlic oil!

 

Homemade Vegetable Stock, Meaty Stock, and Flavored Stock

It’s all soup all the time this week.  It may be the rain that is coming down.  It may be the fact that I just spent an hour cleaning up the old plants out of the veg boxes in my yard and I am CHILLED to the bone — I need a hot bowl of soup right now.  It could also be its one of my favorite things - Homemade STOCK.  So as CSA members - we have LOTS and LOTS of leeks tops, onion roots, kale ribs, celery bulbs, mushroom stems, fennel tops, sweet potato & squash peels, pepper ribs &  tops, apple cores, onion skins - EVERY LITTLE BIT OF VEG SCRAP has a destiny in my kitchen.  They all get to vacation in a plastic bag in my freezer and then on rainy days or slow evenings at home a big stock pot of the MOST delicious homemade stock goes on the stove.  After the stock has cooled I use my leftover Pho Containers to Freeze the stock in quart size containers for use at a later date.

Homemade Vegetable Stock 

by Paige Boger

8-10 garlic cloves, skin on and smashed

1 T whole peppercorns

¼ cup Olive Oil

1 large onion skin on

2 carrots

4 ribs of celery (if your bag does not include a Celery End)

1 gallon zipper bag full of Frozen Vegetables Scraps

2 bay leaves

Some leftover fresh herbs from box (thyme, sage, rosemary)

2 t salt per 1 quart of water added to pot

Pinch of red pepper flakes

In a heavy bottomed stock pot over medium-high heat sauté Olive Oil, Garlic, Onion, Carrot w/ peppercorns for 5 minutes. Add other vegetable scraps along with bay leaves, other aromatics, sauté for 3-5 minutes until just a little bit of good brown bits develop on pan bottom and vegetables. Add water to cover vegetables by 2-3 inches. Reduce heat to medium-low heat, cover and simmer for 90-120 minutes.  Checking every 30 minutes to see if you may need to add just a little bit more water.

Meaty Stock

If you would like to make this a bit meaty you can do ALL of the following: Bones, Skin and Bag of gizzards from from your home roasted thanksgiving turkey. One of my favorite kitchen memories is picking the turkey apart into leftovers and placing right into the stock pot, with my mom when I was a young chef in the kitchen!  Also use Bones and Skin from store bought roasted chickens. Don’t throw these away! Store them in a freezer bag and make stock after you’ve collected a few of them.  Make some stock with whatever roasted meat bones you may have leftover.  

Flavored Stock

Easily make your stock take on any flavors your end product is going to be.  Throw a Jalapeño, Cumin & some cilantro in for more Latin Flavor. Use a bit of Thai Curry Paste in the Olive Oil Sauté stage for something that will be a touch SE Asian Flavors.  Use some Dried Asian Chilis, Sesame Oil, Ginger and Cilantro for some asian flavors.  The most important thing to learn is how this can become some an amazing part of your own cooking tradition. 

 

Too Much Of A Good Thing

As we drove out past the lunchbox peppers this morning, we could see they are still full of fruit.  It has been a long season for them and the nights here are certainly getting colder and the plants are showing it.  With my cook's eyes, I see delicious peppers. Nigel, as the farmer, sees a disappointing crop.  My teacher explained that we didn't leave enough of a break between chickens and planting the peppers, so there was too much fertility. Now we do love the work our birds do on the farm; providing all of the fertility, playing a significant role in pest management, and eating weeds down to nothing. Peppers do well with a lot of nitrogen, but in this case it was just too much of a good thing.  To flush some of that out of the soil, we irrigated more than normal, in order to pull the nitrogen down and away from the plants.  Nigel told me next year, that field would be perfect for the peppers, but because of the regulations we must follow for organic certification, we have to rotate crops, so no peppers for the perfect plot.  Fortunately, there are other nitrogen loving options, like Eggplant, that will be extremely happy there.

Nigel's Mixed Up Fields

A very big expense for us every year is the cost of having seeds sown and grown into little starts for transplanting.  This year we will spend about $40,000 just to get seeds started and that doesn't include the cost of the seeds.  One way to bring this expense down is to mix seeds together before sending them off to Headstart for propagation.  When we jump from 1000 seeds to 5000 the cost of sowing goes from $100 per 1000 to $50 per 1000. A very significant savings. Nigel has taken to mixing things up. For example, with our lettuces, the rows are a mix of all the lettuce varieties we grow. This year, Nigel has added another time saving (therefore money saving) trick to the field mixing and that is switching crops every other row in a bed.  In this picture you can see beds that are a row of cabbage followed by a row of fennel, then repeating.  This was set up so that when we harvest using the harvesting rig, we can have two guys picking cabbage and one guy picking fennel.  That ratio works out just about right.  The fennel is gorgeous and the cabbage plants are huge and healthy looking. A great cabbage season looks promising!  

 

Garlic, This Year and Next

Two weeks ago, Connie put the Garlic Braids up on the website for you all to order as add on items to your box.  Many of you jumped right on that and many braids went out last week. Even more are going out this week!  The braids are fantastic, because when the bulb is left intact with the stem, the cloves don't dry out as quickly.  I have enjoyed my garlic well into the following year, almost to the time the bulb garlic is ready for harvest.  This morning, driving around, we saw Ramon cultivating the new crop for next year's shares.  He gets out there every couple of days, because hoeing the garlic field is one of the least liked jobs the crew has to do.  They make sure to keep the weeds at bay with the machine. The small green shoots look really happy and very strong. Connie wrote about the planting of the garlic, a few weeks ago, in the newsletter and it is amazing to see how much they have grown already!

Citrus

What a gorgeous day on the farm!  We took a lovely drive around this morning. The sun was shining and it was warm. I have been in shorts all day and that is kind of crazy for November.  Nigel really enjoys getting out on the farm.  I think it makes him just a little bit stronger every time.  Our first stop was checking on the citrus trees.  There is an amazing amount of fruit out there.  Tasted a couple of satsumas and tangerines. They are not quite ready, but they promise to be very delicious.  The flavors were good, just not quite sweet enough yet.  From my very inexperienced guesstimating, I am hoping in a couple of weeks we should have some of our fruit for the shares.

 

This Week's Box: November 14th - 19th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

Spinach - Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

Arugula - Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

Fennel - If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.

Cilantro - As soon as you arrive home with fresh cilantro, place the stems (with roots intact if attached) in a glass of water and cover the the top loosely with a plastic bag. Refrigerate. Snip off leaves as you need them and re-cover. The water should be changed every 2 to 3 days. Do not wash the herb until you are ready to use it since excess moisture will turn the leaves to green slime during storage. Will last up to a week.

Stir Fry Mix - These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

Dandelion Greens - Rinse well, wrap in a damp paper towel and place in a plastic bag and Refrigerate. If the towel is kept moist,  greens can last up to one week.

Radishes - Remove the greens (store separately) so they don't draw out excess moisture from the roots. Place them in an open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top. Lasts up to one week.

Green Tomatoes - These can be stored in the fridge and will last up to two weeks.

Butternut Squash - Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Many growers say winter squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

Pomegranates (Twin Girl's) - Keeps up to a month stored on a cool counter.

Apples (Hidden Star Orchards) - Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months. 

Onions - Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Black Bean Chili With Butternut Squash

Nancy's Gratin

Marinated Lentils with Crunchy Vegetables

Carbonara With Radishes

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for: Black Bean Chili With Butternut Squash

1 ½ T olive oil

8 garlic cloves, chopped

2 ½ T chili powder

1 T ground coriander or Cumin

2 14.5-ounce cans fire-roasted tomatoes

1 pound dried black beans, rinsed

3 chipotle chiles from canned chipotle chiles in adobo, minced

1 T Mexican oregano

1 T Eatwell Smoked Chili Salt

1/2 cup quick-cooking bulgur or 1 C Pre-Cooked Eatwell Wheat Berries

Toppings of your choice: Sour cream, Spicy Monterey Jack cheese,  Diced red onion, Chopped fresh cilantro, Pickled jalapeño rings

Shopping list for: Nancy's Gratin

Sweet Potato (if you don't have one from previous shares)

Bacon Fat, Olive Oil, or Butter

Shopping list for: Marinated Lentils with Crunchy Vegetables

2 bay leaves

1½ C black beluga or French green lentils, rinsed, picked through

¼ cup olive oil

1 t coriander seeds

½ t cumin seeds

3 T sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar

4 scallions, thinly sliced

1 C parsley and/or mint leaves

1 C thinly sliced celery hearts and leaves

Shopping list for: Carbonara With Radishes

2 T olive oil

4 ounces pancetta or bacon, cut into ¼-inch pieces

1 small shallot, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

4 large egg yolks

1 large egg

3 ounces mixed salty hard cheeses - Parmesan, Pecorino, and/or Grana Padang

12 ounces strozzapreti or other short pasta

2 T chervil leaves with tender stems

Shopping list for all recipes:

3 ½ T olive oil; plus ¼ cup olive oil

10 garlic cloves

2 ½ T chili powder

1 T ground coriander or Cumin; plus 1 t coriander seeds; plus ½ t cumin seeds

2 14.5-ounce cans fire-roasted tomatoes

1 pound dried black beans, rinsed

3 chipotle chiles from canned chipotle chiles in adobo, minced

1 T Mexican oregano

1 T Eatwell Smoked Chili Salt

1½ cup quick-cooking bulgur or 1 C Pre-Cooked Eatwell Wheat Berries

Toppings of your choice for Black Bean Chili: Sour cream, Spicy Monterey Jack cheese,  Diced red onion, Chopped fresh cilantro, Pickled jalapeño rings

2 bay leaves

1½ C black beluga or French green lentils, rinsed, picked through

3 T sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar

4 scallions, thinly sliced

1 C parsley and/or mint leaves

1 C thinly sliced celery hearts and leaves

4 ounces pancetta or bacon, cut into ¼-inch pieces

1 small shallot, finely chopped

4 large egg yolks

1 large egg

3 ounces mixed salty hard cheeses - Parmesan, Pecorino, and/or Grana Padang

12 ounces strozzapreti or other short pasta

T chervil leaves with tender stems

Sweet Potato (if you don't have one from previous shares)

Bacon Fat, Olive Oil, or Butter

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

 

Carbonara With Radishes

www.bonappetit.com

4 SERVINGS

2 T olive oil

4 ounces pancetta or bacon, cut into ¼-inch pieces

1 small shallot, finely chopped

2 garlic cloves, finely chopped

4 large egg yolks

1 large egg

3 ounces mixed salty hard cheeses - Parmesan, Pecorino, and/or Grana Padang

2 t freshly ground black pepper

12 ounces strozzapreti or other short pasta

Kosher salt

8 small radishes, trimmed, cut into ½-inch pieces

2 T chervil leaves with tender stems

Heat oil in a large skillet over medium. Cook pancetta, stirring occasionally, until just beginning to crisp, about 5 minutes. Add shallot and garlic and cook, stirring often, until softened but not browned, about 1 minute. Transfer mixture to a large bowl and let cool slightly. Mix in egg yolks, egg, cheese, and pepper. Wipe out and reserve skillet.

Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente. Drain, reserving ½ cup pasta cooking liquid.

Add pasta, ¼ cup pasta cooking liquid, and radishes to sauce; toss to combine. Transfer to reserved skillet and cook over low heat, moving skillet on and off heat, to keep sauce from curdling, and stirring constantly, until sauce is smooth and coats a wooden spoon, about 2 minutes.

Divide pasta among bowls and top with chervil, if desired.

 

Marinated Lentils With Crunchy Vegetables

www.bonappetit.com

1 large onion, quartered through root end

2 bay leaves

1½ C black beluga or French green lentils, rinsed, picked through

Kosher salt

¼ cup olive oil

1 t coriander seeds

½ t cumin seeds

3 T sherry vinegar or red wine vinegar

Freshly ground black pepper

6 radishes, trimmed, very thinly sliced

4 scallions, thinly sliced

1 C parsley and/or mint leaves

1 C thinly sliced celery hearts and leaves

Cook onion, bay leaves, and lentils in a large saucepan of simmering salted water until lentils are tender but still firm, 15–20 minutes. Drain; discard onion and bay leaves and transfer lentils to a medium bowl.

Heat oil in a small skillet over medium. Cook coriander seeds and cumin seeds, swirling skillet, until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add spice mixture and vinegar to lentils, season with salt and pepper, and toss to coat.

Just before serving, top lentils with radishes, scallions, herbs, and celery; season with salt and pepper.

Do Ahead: Lentils (without herbs and vegetables) can be marinated 3 days ahead. Cover and chill.

 

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