Lilacs In November

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Cameron, Liz and I were heading back in from a farm walk on Friday.  Going back to the house we took the road on the western side of the farm.  All of a sudden Liz cries out “Look, Lilacs!”.  Seriously?  It’s November, is that normal?  Only the western end of the row has flowers, but they are beautiful and fragrant.  Lilacs were one of Nigel’s favorite things on the farm, so these   feel like a little gift from him, on a gray, cloudy day.

Stir Fry Mix

Have you ever wondered how that bag of Stir Fry Mix comes together?  Well here is a field that shows you exactly how some of it is grown.  Planting beds with rows of different greens saves the guys time from having to go to many different fields. To the mix they add some young chard and kale greens. 

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Blooming Fennel

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Going from one bloom to another, the farm is literally full of color.  The early planting of fennel has gone into almost full bloom, with such a warm/hot Indian Summer, it just can’t help itself.  I like to keep stems of fennel blooms in the kitchen, hanging upside down to dry.  Fennel pollen is delicious in an herb/salt blend, one of my favorite rubs for pork!  I often contemplate adding Fennel Salt to our line up.  Perhaps it is time to do a bit of experimenting?

Happy Thanksgiving!

For those of you who will not receive a CSA share next week, I wish you all a very Happy Thanksgiving, lots of delicious food, wonderful company, silent cell phones, and great conversations.  We will be celebrating here on the farm with our wonderful extended family, and I can’t wait.  It is my favorite holiday, not about gifts, just food and being together.  Of course this year will be bitter sweet.  Nigel and I always loved having our home full of people, gathering around a table of wonderful food, mostly from the farm.  I know he will be in our thoughts all day.  Thanksgiving week is always a busy one for us, particularly since we can not deliver on that Thursday.  If you are a Thursday CSA pick up person, the week of Thanksgiving ONLY, your boxes will be delivered to your regular location on Tuesday!  Please don’t forget, put a reminder on your phone, calendar, tie a string on your finger or write a note on your arm:)

This Week's Box: November 13th- November 19th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Garlic Chives- Store in the refrigerator, wrapped in plastic. Should last 3-5 days.

Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

Bok Choy- Store in a plastic bag in the fridge up to one week.

*Stir Fry Mix- These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

*Cilantro- As soon as you arrive home with fresh cilantro, place the stems (with roots intact if attached) in a glass of water and cover the the top loosely with a plastic bag. Refrigerate. Snip off leaves as you need them and re-cover. The water should be changed every 2 to 3 days. Do not wash the herb until you are ready to use it since excess moisture will turn the leaves to green slime during storage. Will last up to a week.  

Radishes - Remove the greens (store separately) so they don't draw out excess moisture from the roots. Place them in an open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top. Lasts up to one week. 

Persimmons- Store at room temperature until ripe, then refrigerate in a plastic bag. Lasts several days once ripe.

Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

Spinach- Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week.

*Leeks- Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

*Butternut Squash- Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place. Many growers say winter squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

*Apples- Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months.  

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Miso Sweet Potato and Broccoli Bowl

Creamy Pappardelle with Leeks and Bacon

Cilantro Pesto

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for Miso Sweet Potato and Broccoli Bowl

4 TB Olive OIl

1 tsp White Sesame Seeds

1 tsp Black Sesame Seeds

1 TB minced fresh Ginger

2 TB White Miso

2 TB Tahini (other nut butter can work in a pinch)

1 TB Honey

1/4 cup Rice Vinegar

2 TB Toasted Sesame Oil

Shopping list for Creamy Pappardelle with Leeks and Bacon

2 TB Olive Oil

1 TB unsalted Butter

4 slices thick-cut Bacon, cut into 1/2” pieces

3/4 cup Heavy Cream

2 tsp chopped fresh Thyme

1 lb Pappardelle or Fettucine

1 cup finely grated Parmesan or Grana Padano

Shopping list for Cilantro Pesto

1 cup Pine Nuts, extra for garnishing

1 clove Garlic

Juice of 1 Lemon

2 TB Nutritional Yeast

3/4 tsp Sea Salt, or to taste

1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Shopping list for All Recipes:

1 cup Pine Nuts, extra for garnishing

1 clove Garlic

Juice of 1 Lemon

2 TB Nutritional Yeast

3/4 tsp Sea Salt

1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

6 TB Olive Oil

1 TB unsalted Butter

4 slices thick-cut Bacon, cut into 1/2” pieces

3/4 cup Heavy Cream

2 tsp chopped fresh Thyme

1 lb Pappardelle or Fettucine

1 cup finely grated Parmesan or Grana Padano

1 tsp White Sesame Seeds

1 tsp Black Sesame Seeds

1 TB minced fresh Ginger

2 TB White Miso

2 TB Tahini (other nut butter can work in a pinch)

1 TB Honey

1/4 cup Rice Vinegar

2 TB Toasted Sesame Oil

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Cilantro Pesto

Recipe from the website Thyme and Love

Cilantro, it is always sad that it comes in right after all the tomatoes have been mowed.  It simply is too hot to grow cilantro here in the summer time.  But one of my favorite “pestos” is made with Cilantro and Nutritional Yeast.  You can use this on pasta, or as a dip for crudite of raw radishes and broccoli, or a topping for roasted veg.  

3 packed cups of Cilantro

1 cup Pine Nuts, extra for garnishing

1 clove Garlic

Juice of 1 Lemon

2 TB Nutritional Yeast

3/4 tsp Sea Salt, or to taste

1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Add the cilantro, pine nuts, garlic, lemon juice, nutritional yeast, salt to a high speed blender.  Drizzle in the olive oil a little at a time.  Blend until completely smooth.  Taste and adjust seasonings if needed.

Creamy Pappardelle with Leeks and Bacon

Recipe from Bon Appetit by Sara Jenkins

2 TB Olive Oil

1 TB unsalted Butter

4 slices thick-cut Bacon, cut into 1/2” pieces

2 medium Leeks, white and pale-green parts only, halved lengthwise, sliced crosswise

Kosher Salt

3/4 cup Heavy Cream

2 tsp chopped fresh Thyme

1 lb Pappardelle or Fettucine

1 cup Finely grated Parmesan or Grana Padano

Heat oil and butter in a large heavy pot over medium heat.  Add bacon and cook, stirring often, until fat is rendered and bacon is crisp, 5-8 minutes.  Add leeks and season with salt.  Increase heat to medium-high and cook, stirring often, until leeks begin to brown, 5-8 minutes.  Add cream, thyme, and 1/2 cup water.  Bring to a boil, reduce heat, and simmer, stirring occasionally, until sauce is thickened and coats the back of a spoon, 5-8 minutes.  Meanwhile, cook pasta in a large pot of boiling salted water, stirring occasionally, until al dente.  Drain pasta, reserving 2 cups pasta cooking liquid.  Add pasta, Parmesan, and 1 cup pasta cooking liquid to sauce and stir to coat.  Increase heat to medium and continue stirring, adding more cooking liquid as needed, until sauce coats pasta.

Miso Sweet Potato and Broccoli Bowl

Original Recipe from Goop, shared on the Eatwell CSA Slack site by our member Diego

We don’t have sweet potatoes in the box this week, but we do have butternut squash, which I often use in place of sweet potatoes.  My thought is this: sweet potatoes, winter squash and carrots are all orange, sweet and similar in texture when cooked appropriately, so why not take advantage of your farm veg by switching it up a bit?  My suggestions with this recipe will be to use your butternut squash.  Smitten Kitchen served it on a bed of mixed rice, the original recipe served it on a bed of spinach, so that’s what I am going with here.

1 1/2 lbs Butternut Squash

Broccoli, if you have Cabbage use that instead, I have added the Bok Choi to the recipe for added crunch

Bok Choi

Spinach or Stir Fry Mix 

1 to 2 TB Olive OIl

Coarse or Kosher Salt

Freshly ground Black Pepper

1 tsp White Sesame Seeds

1 tsp Black Sesame Seeds

Miso Dressing:

1 TB minced fresh Ginger

2 TB White Miso

2 TB Tahini (other nut butter can work in a pinch)

1 TB Honey

1/4 cup Rice Vinegar

2 TB Toasted Sesame Oil

2 TB Olive Oil

Heat oven to 400 F.  If you want a rice bowl, start cooking your rice now.  Peel, seed and slice butternut squash into 1” cubes  Cut tops off broccoli and separate into bite sized florets.  Cut stems into 1/2 to 1” segments.  But the bottoms off the bok choi, wash well, then chop into bite sized pieces. If putting this dish on a bed of spinach, wash it well, the farm has been a bit muddy!  If using stir fry mix, wash lightly:).  Coat one large or two smaller trays with a thin slick of olive oil.  Layer butternut and sprinkle with salt and pepper.  Roast for 20 minutes, until browning underneath.  Flip and toss chunks around, then add broccoli (or cabbage wedges if using cabbage), and bok choi. Roast until broccoli is lightly charred at edges and butternut squash is fully bronzed and tender.  Toss chunks around one more time if it looks like they’re cooking unevenly.  In a small skillet, toast black and white sesame seeds until fragrant.  You can do this in the oven if using an oven proof skillet.  Let cool.  While vegetables roast, prepare sesame-miso dressing: Combine everything in a blender and run until smooth, scraping down sides once.  Taste and adjust ingredients if needed, but try to resist adding more honey if it tastes salty, it works well with the sweetness of the butternut squash.  If you are putting this on a bed of spinach or stir fry mix, quickly sauté to wilt.  Assemble bowls: Scoop some rice or spinach into each bowl, then pile on the roasted veg.  Coat lightly with sesame-miso dressing and finish with toasted sesame seed duo.  Serve with extra dressing on the side.

Roasted Fall Veggies with Creamy Dill Sauce

by Liz Young

When I saw sweet potatoes, butternut squash, fennel, radishes, and dill are on the list this week, I knew right away what I am going to do with those! When the weather turns cool, it is a great reason to turn on the oven and heat up the house while making dinner. If you want to speed this up a bit, I often use Lorraine's trick for cutting butternut squash—turn the oven on to 350 or so, wash the squash well and just stick it whole in the oven for 20 minutes or so, rotating at least once. This softens the skin and the flesh slightly and makes it super easy to peel and cut. Also, if you wish to speed up the sweet potato cooking, wash them well to remove all dirt, then lightly boil them in salted water for 10 minutes or so until they are a little less hard when you poke them with a fork. You don't want them to be too soft because they will fall apart in the oven. This combination goes well on it's own, or mix some finely chopped chard leaves or kale into the roasted mix as soon as it comes out of the oven. A perfect fall side dish to any kind of protein! If opting out of the dill sauce, a few tbsp of chevre sprinkled atop, a  and another light drizzle of olive oil is a nice addition. Also, use the leftovers in a quick breakfast scramble with eggs or inside an omelet. Dill drizzle too, of course!

Roasted Fall Veggies with Dill:

1 butternut squash, seeds removed, peeled and cubed ~ 1 in pieces

2 large or 3 smaller sweet potatoes, (peeled or not-your preference) cubed ~ 1 in pieces

4 cloves of garlic, chopped

1 large or 2 small fennel, fronds removed (can garnish with a few of these at end!), bulb cored and chopped

1 bunch of radishes, cubed

2-3 heaping tbsp chopped fresh dill

4 or 5 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

Sea Salt

Fresh ground black pepper

1 bunch greens (chard, kale, arugula-whatever you have), chopped (optional)

 

Dill Yogurt Sauce:

3/4 cup plain yogurt (greek style is good if you like it thicker)

1clove garlic, grated

1 tsp lemon juice

½ tsp lemon zest

1 tbsp finely chopped fresh dill

sea salt

fresh ground pepper

 

Heat oven to 425. Mix squash, potatoes, radishes, and fennel together in a bowl with a few tbsp of olive oil until well-coated (I like to use a mix of olive oil and sunflower oil), then sprinkle with sea salt (about 2 pinches) and give a good mix again. Spread onto a rimmed baking sheet and roast uncovered for 20 minutes. Pull out of the oven, mix in garlic and the dill, then you might add another drizzle of olive oil if they look a little dry. Roast for another 20 minutes, giving them a stir every now and again or until potatoes and squash are soft and veggies are starting to brown. While the veggies are roasting is a good time to construct the sauce. Whisk well in a bowl grated garlic, yogurt, lemon juice and zest, dill, salt and pepper, then set aside. Once veggies look perfect enough to eat, pull them out of the oven, give them a good mix, add salt and pepper to taste, if needed, then let them cool 5 mins or more, before serving with a drizzle of sauce to complete. Note: If adding chopped greens to this dish, mix them as soon as the veggies come out of the oven, so they wilt slightly with the heat. If using chevre instead of dill sauce, sprinkle on when serving.

 

Thanksgiving and Care Shares

Impossible to believe but when I checked the calendar this morning we are two weeks from Thanksgiving! As I write this I am finishing up a wonderful long weekend escape in Puerto Vallarta with one of my oldest friends. When I get home I definitely have to shift gears into full-blown fall feast mode. I know many of you leave town for the holidays so I wanted to remind you all that you can donate your share to the Care Share fund rather than putting on hold. On a weekly basis, we are delivering boxes to The Family House connected to the Children’s hospital at UCSF Mission Bay, and shares are going to the seniors at the Potrero Hill Neighborhood House. Additionally, we have individual Care Share members who are battling serious illnesses who are so grateful to receive fresh fruits and veg every week. This is such important work and I am very proud to be in a position, with your generous support, to offer more than just the 10 boxes the farm has committed to on a weekly basis. If you are not putting your box on hold anytime soon but you would like to give you can donate shares directly as an add-on. Thank you all for the support you have already given this program.$29.00 is not much, but a box of produce can make a big difference to someone who really needs good nutrition! 

This Week's Box: November 7th- November 13th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Radishes - Remove the greens (store separately) so they don't draw out excess moisture from the roots. Place them in an open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top. Lasts up to one week. 

Green Kale - Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week. 

*Dill - Keeps well in your fridge. Should last up to 7 days. For best results put stems in a jar with clean water as a vase and cover with a plastic bag to keep protected culture

Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Spinach- Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.

Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week.

Leeks- Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

*Butternut Squash- Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place. Many growers say winter squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

Raisins- Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

*Apples- Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months.  

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Roasted Fall Veggies with Creamy Dill Sauce

Spinach and Leek Soup with Garlic and Cannellini Beans

Whole Wheat Apple Muffins

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for Roasted Fall Veggies with Creamy Dill Sauce

4 cloves of garlic, chopped

4 or 5 tbsp extra virgin olive oil

3/4 cup plain yogurt (greek style is good if you like it thicker)

1clove garlic, grated

1 tsp lemon juice

½ tsp lemon zest

 

Shopping list for Spinach and Leek Soup with Garlic and Cannellini Beans

2 tbsp olive oil

4 cloves of garlic, sliced lengthwise

2 tsp dried mustard

6 cups Eatwell chicken stock

1 15.oz can cannelini beans, drained and rinsed (¾ cup dried white beans cooked)

2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

½ cup gruyere cheese, finely grated

 

Shopping list for Whole Wheat Apple Muffins

1 cup whole wheat flour

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

1 tbsp cinnamon

½ unsalted butter, at room temp

1/2 cup granulated sugar

½ cup brown sugar, packed, divided

1 large egg, lightly beaten

1 cup buttermilk or yogurt

 

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Get Our Favorite Kimchi, Granola and More With Your Box

We just launched Lorraine’s Market Finds, featuring some of my favorite goodies from the Ferry Plaza Farmers Market. We are starting out with just a few items, but my hope is to expand this section of “extras” so we can cover more of your basic needs. For now, we are starting out with some of my favorite treats from Little Apple Treats, Nana Joe’s Granola, and Volcano Kimchi.

Little Apple Treats owners’ Dan and Joanne are old friends. They began playing with the apples out of their orchard and discovered they could make truly delicious products and the creativity began to flow. I absolutely love their Apple Cider Vinegar and use it quite often in my salad dressings, sprinkle a bit over sautéed greens, or mixed with a bit of bubbly water as a very healthy, refreshing drink. Their ACV is stronger than most of what you buy in the store so I typically use it sparingly. When they came out with the caramels I found my new addiction. The funny thing is I am not a fan of caramels, but these are just so delicious, they are literally one of my favorite treats. They are quite rich and typically one leaves me pretty satisfied.

Nana Joe’s Granola is just amazing. I actually became a fan of Nana Joe’s before I started eating the granola, and that is because Michelle Pusateri, the owner and founder, is just an amazing woman. She is such an enterprising and supportive businesswoman, reaching out to the community, working with different chefs for seasonal specialty blends. I know you will love her granolas as much as we do! I chose three of the flavors, on is grain free, one is sweetener free, and the other is very much a standard granola. All three are delicious!

Volcano Kimchi is not just another kimchi company. I haven’t yet had the chance to meet Aruna Lee, but she has been shopping our stand at the market for quite a while now. The Jicama is my absolute favorite, I just love the crunch. The Napa Cabbage is more traditional, and just perfectly balanced. Kimchi is a great way to add another fermented food to your weekly diet. I firmly believe eating a broad variety of fermented foods is one of the healthiest things we can do to improve our diet. The Napa Cabbage will be made with Eatwell Cabbage when it is back in season for us.

I hope you give one of our new items a try. I love supporting my friends, and sharing some of my favorite treats from the market with all of you! And if this goes well, we can add more.

Autumns Arrival

By: Liz, Site Host and Former CSA Manager

Lorraine took a much-needed mini vacation with her good friend Mark to slow down and get some good sleep. Noelle also went on vacation, so I am lending a helping hand to Cameron in their absence. One thing I got to assist with last week was preparing the herbs for the market. With clippers and twist ties in hand, I headed out to the fields. When I worked as CSA manager on the farm, I truly appreciated the time spent walking the fields with Nigel- inspecting the growth and health of the crops, making our list for the box, taking pictures for the blog and newsletter, and learning something every minute. The truth is, when working on the business side of things, it is hard to get out in the fields, so time spent among the rows of veggies is all the more special. As I worked among the rosemary bushes, I saw Miguel drive up to the chicken pasture, give a honk from the truck and the hens happily danced their way towards him- it was feeding time! I recalled a memory with Nigel some years back when we witnessed this and he smiled and said, "their prince charming has arrived". I moved on to cut bunches of thyme, calendula, and garlic chives and waved to some of the guys out picking strawberries as I passed by. I thought, wow! strawberries in November! But it was the smile on their face that stuck with me because I thought, yes! This is the sweet time of year for our farm workers, when the wind rattles through the poplar trees rustling their leaves, the sky fills with cloud and there is a final respite from the summer heat. I couldn’t help but feel immense gratitude...for the work the crew does day in and out, for that cool autumn breeze, for the majestic sun working its way behind the Berryessa hills taking the last of the daylight with it, for all that Nigel taught me and for all the farm has given me and for that beautiful fall day among the fields at Eatwell Farm.

Spinach and Leek Soup with Garlic and Cannellini Beans

Adapted by Liz Recipe from finecooking.com

This light and easy soup is a quick one to make, especially if using canned beans.  If you have dried beans and have time to cook them the day before, even better.  Lorraine and I are just a little obsessed with Rancho Gordo’s Marcella beans.  If you are lucky enough to find some, grab them.  They are a perfect white bean for winter soups!  As the season changes and the fall winds blow through, so does cold and flu season.  This is a nice soup for colds, flus, and for a little immune system boost.

2 tbsp olive oil

2 leeks, trimmed, white and light green parts sliced ¼ in thick

4 cloves of garlic, sliced lengthwise

2 tsp dried mustard

6 cups Eatwell chicken stock

1 bunch spinach, rinsed well, trimmed and cut into ribbons

1 15.oz can cannelini beans, drained and rinsed (¾ cup dried white beans cooked)

2 tbsp fresh lemon juice

Salt and fresh ground pepper

½ cup gruyere cheese, finely grated

Heat olive oil on medium heat in a 6 qt pot.  Add leeks, stirring often about 5 minutes until tender and starting to brown.Add garlic and mustard, cooking until fragrant just a minute or so.  Turn heat up and add chicken stock until it barely boils. Add washed spinach and beans to the pot. When spinach begins to wilt, turn off heat, add lemon juice, salt, and pepper to taste. Serve topped with cheese and a drizzle of olive oil.

Whole Wheat Apple Muffins

Adapted by Liz Young from smittenkitchen.com

Yay for apple season!  Deb Perelman of Smitten Kitchen has tried and true recipes for all things savory and sweet.  She suggests not skipping on the brown sugar top here, but if you want less sweet muffins, it is still ok to do that.  Also, I think adding the delicious raisins in your box this week to the batter would make these even better!

Yield:  18 muffins

1 cup whole wheat flour

1 cup all-purpose flour

1 tsp baking powder

1 tsp baking soda

¼ tsp salt

1 tbsp cinnamon

½ unsalted butter, at room temp

1/2 cup granulated sugar

½ cup brown sugar, packed, divided

1 large egg, lightly beaten

1 cup buttermilk or yogurt

2 large or 3 small apples, peeled, cored, and coarsely chopped

Preheat oven to 450.  Grease and flour 18 muffin cups, set aside.

Mix together flours, baking powder, baking soda, salt, and cinnamon, set aside.  In a separate bowl, cream the butter and add granulated sugar and ¼ cup of the brown sugar.  Beat until fluffy.  Add the egg, mix well, and stop to scrape side and bottom of the bowl once.  Mix in the buttermilk, gently.  (If you over-mix, the buttermilk will cause the mixture to curdle).  Stir in dry ingredients and fold in apple chunks (and raisins if using). Divide the batter evenly among muffin cups, then sprinkling the remaining ¼ cup brown sugar (or not, if you want these less sweet).  Bake 10 minutes, then turn heat down to 400, bake an additional 5 to 10 minutes, or until a toothpick inserted into the middle comes out clean. Let muffins cool 5 mins before turning tin out onto wire rack to cool completely.  

Tomatillo Fail

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This year we never got to harvest the tomatillos.  I am not sure exactly what the problem was, but I think it was the long wet rainy winter we had.  Getting plants into the ground so late in the season just seemed to slow everything down. The paper husks looked beautiful, but the fruit inside stayed small.  Needing such a long time to grow the weeds really took over.  Hoping for better luck next year!

Flowers From Nigel

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Last year Nigel and Lizzie were going through the seed catalog.  Mostly the two of them were looking at flowers.  Nigel thought it would be really nice to grow some Statice to include in the CSA shares as a little gift from him.  Walking around the farm Friday evening, Cameron and I came upon his statice plants.  They are beginning to flower. Statice, also known as Sea Lavender (rather fitting for Nigel I thought) is a perennial, so if we don’t get enough flowers to share with you all this year, I certainly hope we will by next year!

Boxes, Boxes, Boxes

Are not making their way back to the farm. We are coming close to needing a pallet of boxes every 2 1/2 weeks. At a cost of $2.15 for each box, it is getting pretty expensive. So please, if you have a pile of boxes cluttering up your space, free yourself and bring them back to your local pickup site! We will be happy, you will be happy, the planet will be happy!

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This Week's Box: October 31st- November 6th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Spinach- Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

*Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in the fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*Leeks- Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

Stir Fry Mix- These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

Turnips- If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days. 

*Tomatoes - Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness, place in a paper bag with an apple.

*Butternut Squash- Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place. Many growers say winter squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

Raisins- Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

*Apples- Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months.  

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Stir Fried Chicken with Greens

Saffron Risotto with Butternut Squash

Lavender Roasted Turnips and Apples

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for Stir Fried Chicken with Greens

8 oz boneless, skinless Chicken Breast, cut across the grain into 1/4” by 1/2” pieces

1 TB Egg White, lightly beaten

2 tsp Cornstarch

1 1/2 tsp plus 1 TB Rice Wine or Dry Sherry

1/4 cup Chicken Stock or Vegetable Stock

1 T. Low-sodium Soy Sauce

2 TB Peanut Oil, Rice Bran Oil or Canola Oil

1 TB minced Ginger

2 fat Garlic cloves, minced

1/2 tsp Red Pepper Flakes

4 to 6 Scallions, cut on the diagonal 1/2” lengths, dark green part separated

6 to 8 Brussel Sprouts, quartered OR use Turnips instead

1 small or 1/2 large Red Bell Pepper, cut in thin 2” strips

Rice, whole grains or noodles for serving

Shopping list for Saffron Risotto with Butternut Squash

2 TB Olive Oil

6 cups Chicken Stock

6 TB unsalted Butter

2 oz Pancetta, diced

1 1/2 cups Arborio Rice

1/2 cup dry White Wine

1 tsp Saffron Threads

1 cup freshly grated Parmesan

Shopping list for Lavender Roasted Turnips and Apples

2 TB Solid Cooking Fat, melted

1/2 tsp Lavender or 1 1/2 tsp Lavender Salt

1 clove Garlic, minced

1 tsp fresh Thyme, minced

1 tsp Sea Salt

 

 

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Lavender Roasted Turnips and Apples

Recipe by Angie Alt from autoimmunewellness.com

Emily, our former CSA manager, sent me a link to this recipe. Fits perfectly with this week’s box! I would suggest switching the straight lavender buds to 1 1/2 tsp Eatwell Lavender Salt.

Turnips, ends trimmed, chopped

2 Apples, cut into wedges

2 TB Solid Cooking Fat, melted

1/2 tsp Lavender or 1 1/2 tsp Lavender Salt

1 clove Garlic, minced

1 tsp fresh Thyme, minced

1 tsp Sea Salt

Preheat oven to 425 F. Line a baking sheet with parchment paper. Toss turnips, apple wedges, and seasonings in melted fat to coat evenly. Roast for 30 minutes. Serve.

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