This Week's Box: June 18th- 24th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Apricots- Set out at room temperature, away from direct sunlight or heat. For the best tasting apricots, eat or use them within 2-3 days.

*Zucchini- Does fine for a few days if left out on a cool counter, even after cut. Wrap in a cloth and refrigerate for longer storage. Do not wash until ready to eat. Lasts 4-5 days.

*Collards- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last 3-5 days.

*Radishes- Remove the greens (store separately) so they don't draw out excess moisture from the roots. Place them in an open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top. Lasts up to one week. 

*Basil- Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week.

*Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week. 

*Bok Choy- This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs! 

Carrots- Cut the tops off to keep them fresh longer. Place them in a closed container with plenty of moisture, either wrapped in a damp towel or dunk them in cold water every couple of days if they’re stored that long.

Potatoes- Store potatoes in a cool, well-ventilated place. Don't wash the potatoes before storing as dampness promotes early spoilage. Will last at least one week.

Parsley- Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

Garlic- Store whole in a cool dry place around 55-60 degrees. Can last 3-5 months.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Shepard’s Pie

Summer Squash and Collards with Pistachios

Apricot, Basil and Goat Cheese Pizza

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Shepard’s Pie

1 pound ground pork or beef

1 onion, chopped

2 rutabagas or turnips, cut into small cubes

1 tsp Worcestershire sauce or 1 tbsp mustard

4 tbsp (½ stick) butter softened

½ cup milk

1 pinch ground nutmeg

Shopping list for Summer Squash and Collards with Pistachios

1/2 Yellow Onion, peeled and sliced 1/8”

1/2 cup Bread Crumbs

1/4 to 1/3 cup shelled Pistachios, coarsely chopped

1/4 cup White Wine

1/2 TB each fresh Oregano, chopped

Olive Oil as needed

Shopping list for Apricot, Basil and Goat Cheese Pizza

1-2 12-inch pizza crusts or pre-made pizza crusts, flatbread, Naan or pita bread rounds

4 ounces crumbled goat cheese

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Apricot, Basil and Goat Cheese Pizza

Recipe from Karista’s Kitchen

1-2 12-inch pizza crusts or pre-made pizza crusts, flatbread, Naan or pita bread rounds

1/2 – 1 cup traditional basil pesto or your own homemade pesto

4 apricots, pitted and sliced

4 ounces crumbled goat cheese

1 bunch basil, whole leaves only

If using homemade pizza dough, spread ¼ cup or more of basil pesto on the pizza dough. Top with crumbled goat cheese, apricot slices and basil leaves.

Bake the pizza on the parchment in a 450°F oven either on the heated pizza stone or on a cookie sheet. The pizza is done baking when the crust is brown and crisp on the edge and bottom. This should take about 6 to 10 minutes.

Remove the pizza from the oven, garnish with additional basil leaves if desired. Let it cool for about five minutes, then cut and serve.

If using a pre-made pizza crust, Naan, flatbread or Pita round

Reduce the oven heat to 400F and place them on a pizza stone or baking sheet.

Top the crusts with ¼ cup or more of basil pesto, crumbled goat cheese, apricot slices and basil leaves. Bake in the oven for about 5-8 minutes or just until the goat cheese looks soft and slightly melted and the crust is golden brown.

Remove it from the oven and garnish with additional basil leaves if desired. Let it cool for about five minutes then cut slices and serve.    

Shepard’s Pie

Recipe from BountyFromtheBox.com

1 pound ground pork or beef

1 onion, chopped

2 carrots, cut into small cubes

2 rutabagas or turnips, cut into small cubes

½ bunch of small shredded cabbage

1 tsp worcestershire sauce or 1 tbsp mustard

salt

Freshly ground black pepper (or use chili flakes)

1 cup water or broth

1½ pounds potatoes quartered

4 tbsp (½ stick) butter softened

½ cup milk

1 pinch ground nutmeg

Sauté the meat in a skillet on medium heat for about 5 minutes until it has browned, making sure to break the meat up as it cooks.
When the meat has released its fat, add the onion, carrots, rutabagas, greens (if using), Worcestershire sauce, salt, and pepper. Cover and reduce the heat to low and cook for another 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add the water, stir, and simmer, covered, for another 15 minutes.
Meanwhile, place the potatoes in a large pot of cold water. Bring them to a boil and cook for 20 minutes, or until quite soft. Drain and mash the potatoes with the butter, milk, and nutmeg. Season to taste with salt and pepper.
Preheat the oven to 400°F.
Place the meat and vegetable mixture in a large ovenproof dish and cover it evenly with the mashed potatoes. Finish by drawing a fork across the top of the potatoes in the pattern of your choice. Bake for 30 minutes, or until the potatoes begin to brown and the mixture is hot throughout Serve warm.

Summer Squash and Collards with Pistachios

Recipe found on High Ground Organics website recipe attributed to Chef Andrew Cohen

1 bunch Collards, stems removed and sliced into 1/4” ribbons, washed and drained, not dried

3 medium Zucchini, ends removed, split lengthwise and cut into 1/4” pieces

3 Pattypan Squash, halved through the widest point and cut into wedges 1/2” at the widest point

1/2 Yellow Onion, peeled and sliced 1/8” thing

2 cloves Garlic, peeled and minced

1/2 cup Bread Crumbs

1/4 to 1/3 cup shelled Pistachios, coarsely chopped

1/4 cup White Wine

1/2 TB each fresh Parsley, and Oregano, chopped

Salt and Pepper to taste

Olive Oil as needed

Heat a 12” pan over medium heat.  When hot, film well with oil and add the onions.  Cook just until wilting, but don’t let them color.  Add the collards and toss the greens to mix with the onions and coat with the oil.  Cook gently, allowing the greens to wilt.  Once the green have begun to lose some volume, add the white wine and toss the greens to coat.  Cook until the wine evaporates and the greens are tender.  Season with salt and pepper and toss to combine.  Remove to a serving dish.  While the greens are cooking, put the squash into a bowl and lightly coat with olive oil, tossing to coat all the surfaces.  Season with salt and pepper.  When the greens are done, film the hot pan with oil.  Add the squash and turn the pieces so the cut surfaces are on the pan bottom.  Cook so the surfaces are just crisping and turning golden.  Turn the squash and cook the flip side.  Cook enough to heat the squash through and color a little, but do not cook to soften the squash much.  The squash should retain some crunch for the dish to be successful.  When the squash are lightly golden on the cut sides and heated through, make a well in the center of the vegetables and add a dollop of oil.  When it is warmed, add the garlic and cook until fragrant.  Toss the vegetables to mix in the garlic.  Sprinkle the herbs over the squash and toss to mix.  Scatter the nuts over the dish, then add the greens and onions.  Toss to combine, well, then add the breadcrumbs.  Toss the vegetable to combine with the breadcrumbs, and cook so some of the breadcrumbs brown. Add a little oil if the dish is too dry. Serve hot.

Freezing Excess Veggies

Walking the farm it is quite obvious that we are quickly approaching Summer. Zucchini, tomatoes, eggplants, peppers will all be ready soon, zucchini is already coming in. As we have collards and chard in this week’s box I strongly encourage you to wash, chop and sauté, then stick it into a ziplock and freeze it for later in the summer. 

If you put it in the freezer flat, do not over fill the bag, it is actually pretty easy to break it into bits, and this way you can make up a soup and add a little bit of greens. Of course you can also put it into small bags and portion it out. Either way, come August, most of us would be happy to have some prepared greens int he freezer. You could even goes so far as to include parsley and garlic and a little bit of diced carrot and make an almost complete soup or stew base.  So often I find delicious recipes for tomatoes that call for some kind of green to go with it, but of course they are out of season for us here at that time.  

Parsley added to Pesto keeps it a much brighter green. For 1 cup of Basil add 1/4 cup of Parsley. Pesto can be frozen in ice cube trays and then popped into freezer bags for easy storage.  It is important to remember that when we choose to eat seasonally part of what we do is “put things up” as my Grandma used to say.  In our modern world, we have many easy options. Pesto takes mere minutes with a food processor (of course if you are a purest you will only make it in a mortar and pestle), dehydrators, freezers, canners, some people even invest in freeze driers.  I stick more to the basics, I use a giant pot and boiling water for canning, I air and oven dry herbs, and freeze lots of things. The past few weeks I have really taken advantage of the frozen greens we pre-cooked when loads of stuff came back from the market. It saved me loads of time when cooking for 25 people over the lavender weekend. Not preparing an entire meal, but rather prepping food gives you a lot of flexibility once you are at your destination.  Take advantage of what is in your box and bri

This Week's Box: June 11th- June 17th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

* Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

* Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water. 

* Zucchini- Does fine for a few days if left out on a cool counter, even after cut. Wrap in a cloth and refrigerate for longer storage. Do not wash until ready to eat. Lasts 4-5 days.

* Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

Basil- Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week.

Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week. 

Spring Garlic- Wrap the green garlic in a damp paper towel and place it in a plastic bag. Should last 5-7 days. 

* Peaches- Peaches are climacteric, which means they continue to ripen after picking and should be stored at room temperature, away from sunlight and heat until they give softly to the touch and have a sweet aroma. After ripe, refrigerate as necessary to prevent spoiling. Will last up to a week.

Carrots- Cut the tops off to keep them fresh longer. Place them in a closed container with plenty of moisture, either wrapped in a damp towel or dunk them in cold water every couple of days if they’re stored that long.

* New Potatoes- Store potatoes in a cool, well-ventilated place. Don't wash the potatoes before storing as dampness promotes early spoilage. Will last at least one week.

Parsley- Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Swiss Chard Tart

Ethiopian Cabbage Dish

Fresh Peach and Basil Salad

Salmon with Fennel

Lizzie’s Fennel Frond Ice Tea

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Swiss Chard Tart

2 cups Unbleached Flour

1/2 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

3 large Eggs

1 cup freshly grated Parmesan Cheese

Shopping list for Ethiopian Cabbage Dish

1/2 cup Olive Oil

1 Onion, thinly sliced

1/2 tsp ground Cumin

1/2 tsp ground Turmeric

Shopping list for Fresh Peach and Basil Salad

1 TB Honey

1/2 cup Lemon Chèvre or plain Chèvre plus some Lemon Zest

Shopping list for Salmon with Fennel

5 cups sliced yellow onions, 1/4-inch thick (3 pounds)

1/2 cup good olive oil

3 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves, coarsely chopped

1 orange, zested

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice

1 (10 pound) fresh salmon 

 

Shopping list for Lizzie’s Fennel Frond Ice Tea

1 TB Honey

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Ethiopian Cabbage Dish

Recipe from allrecipes.com

1/2 cup Olive Oil

4 Carrots, thinly sliced

1 Onion, thinly sliced

1 tsp Sea Salt

1/2 tsp ground Black Pepper

1/2 tsp ground Cumin

1/2 tsp ground Turmeric

1 head Cabbage, shredded

 

Heat olive oil in a skillet over medium heat.  Cook the carrots and onion in the hot oil about 5 minutes.  Stir in the salt, pepper, cumin, turmeric, cabbage and cook another 15 to 20 minutes.  Add the potatoes; cover.  Reduce heat to medium-low and cook until potatoes are soft, 20 to 30 minutes.

 

Fresh Peach and Basil Salad

4 to 6  Peaches, pitted and cut into bite size pieces

1 TB Honey

6 Basil leaves, thinly sliced

1/2 cup Lemon Chèvre or plain Chèvre plus some Lemon Zest

A pinch of Salt

 

Place the peaches in a bowl.  Drizzle with honey and sprinkle with salt.  Toss to coat.  Gently fold in basil and Chèvre.  Serve immediately.

 

Salmon with Fennel

From Barefoot Contessa Cookbook, 1999

5 cups sliced yellow onions, 1/4-inch thick (3 pounds)

5 cups sliced fennel bulbs, 1/4-inch thick (3 pounds)

1/2 cup good olive oil

3 tablespoons fresh thyme leaves, coarsely chopped

2 tablespoons coarsely chopped fennel fronds

1 orange, zested

2 tablespoons freshly squeezed orange juice

2 teaspoons kosher salt

1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

1 (10 pound) fresh salmon  

 

Have the fishmonger cut the head and tail off the salmon and butterfly it, removing all the bones. You should have about 7 pounds of salmon.

Preheat the oven to 500 degrees F.

Saute the onions and fennel in the olive oil for 10 minutes on medium-high heat, stirring occasionally. Add the thyme leaves, fennel fronds, orange zest, orange juice, salt, and pepper and saute for 5 more minutes, until the onions and fennel are tender. Taste for salt and pepper.

Lay the salmon, skin side down, on a cutting board and sprinkle both sides generously with salt and pepper. Spread the fennel filling over half of the salmon. Pull the other half up and over the filling, enclosing it. Tie the salmon every 2 inches with kitchen string to secure the stuffing.

Place a sheet pan lined with parchment paper in the oven for 5 minutes to heat it. Carefully transfer the salmon to the hot sheet pan and bake it for exactly 30 minutes (10 minutes for each 1-inch of thickness). Do not overbake!

Allow to cool slightly, then remove the strings. To serve, cut into thick slices with a very sharp knife. This salmon is delicious hot or at room temperature.

Note: If you're making this in advance, be sure to cool the filling before stuffing the salmon. Refrigerate until ready to roast.

 

Swiss Chard Tart

Recipe from NYT by Patricia Wells

Hoping to give this one a try this week.  I love savory pies, especially done in a hand pie form, because they are easier to take on the go for lunch.  Pt together an arugula salad and you will have a nice light meal.  

For the Pastry:

2 cups Unbleached Flour

12 tsp Salt

1/2 cup Water

1/2 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

To prepare the pastry:

Combine the flour and salt in a medium-size bowl.  Stir in the water, then the oil, mixing until thoroughly blended.  Knead briefly.  The dough will be very moist, much like a cookie dough.  Press the dough into a 10 1/2” metal tart tin with a removable bottom.  

For the Filling

1 lb Swiss Chard leaves

Salt and Pepper, to taste

3 large Eggs

1 cup freshly grated Parmesan Cheese

To Prepare the Filling:

Wash and dry the green leafy portion of the chard, discarding the center white stem.  Break up the leaves and chop them, in several batches, in a food processor.  

 

Preheat oven to 400 F.  Place the chard in a large, shallow frying pan and season with salt and pepper.  Over low heat, wilt the chard and cook until most of the liquid has evaporated.  Combine the eggs and the cheese in a medium-size bowl and mix until thoroughly blended.  Stir in the chard, mix well, then pour the vegetable mixture into the prepared tart tin.  Bake until the crust is golden and the chard mixture is firm and browned, about 40 minutes.  Remove from the oven to cool.  Serve at room temperatures.

Lizzie’s Fennel Frond Ice Tea

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Over the weekend, one of my favorite treats was Lizzie’s Fennel Frond Iced Tea. Might seem crazy with all the food we had, but when I cook a lot I eat a little, but I get so thirsty.  This is so refreshing, and most certainly good for digestion.  Take about 1/3 of your fronds and put into a good sized iced tea container, about 1/2 gallon size, or 1/2 gallon mason jar.  Boil water and pour enough to cover the fronds.  Make sure you are using a container that can handle the  heat, if not wait a couple of minutes for it to cool just slightly, and pour in slowly bit by bit.  If you want it sweetened add 1 TB Honey while it is hot.  Allow to cool, remove fronds then fill with ice. 

“Framily”- Eatwell’s Friends and Family

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I always title my newsletter doc by the Wednesday date of the current week.  This particular Wednesday, June 6th, is my Birthday.  To “celebrate” I hope to make a quick escape up to Sierra Hot Springs for some quiet alone time. I don’t get much time by myself, and I feel that a little solitude to be with my thoughts and my heart will be a very good way to spend this particular birthday.  Last year was the last time Nigel and I shared my birthday together, sadly with him in a bed fairly unaware and unable to comprehend the tea party my sweet friends and family had for me. As I navigate through this first year without him, there are many of these days and moments that I have had to be strong and get through. It is quite fitting for me to make my way up to Sierra to soak, and have a chance, now that I have a little more strength, to sit with my grief and my memories quietly alone.

Although I am far from alone in this world, I am very much missing the man who is my life partner. Life on the farm is constantly busy and always filled with wonderful people.  There is no shortage of socializing here even though most of my friends live in or around SF. The farm is place the draws people to it, and that is so healing and such a beautiful thing to participate in. I can not continue with this stream of thought without acknowledging the constant companionship, love and support I have flowing my way from Cameron and Lilly who have joined me here on the farm. They are my daily companions, we make and share meals together, have our evening rituals of watching shows like GOT, the little things to replace some of the many I have now lost.  

This past year has been a very busy one, filled with many opposites, tremendous sorrow and grief, great travels, lots of lovely times with my “framily” (friends who are family), loads and loads of good busy work, and a lot of learning. I do not have the freedom to simply check out and face all this grief head on, I have this farm to run, so toe dipping is about as much as I can handle. Nigel’s memorial has been one of the hardest things for me and the almost year’s worth of time hasn’t made it any easier to plan, which I had hoped. It is coming together finally as I get a clearer picture of how it will go and flow.

The Pizza Oven in many ways gave me a focal or jumping off point.  The project began this weekend and it was perfect. The weather was warm, but we were blessed with a nice breeze. Miguel came out Friday morning to get the base built. By Saturday morning, we were ready for the volunteer helpers.  It was amazing how quickly the oven took shape. We did a little blessing for Nigel who for years dreamed of a pizza oven. It is healing to make one of his dreams come true. But the real healing comes from all of you, those of you who so generously gave to support this project and of course those of you who came out this weekend to help with the build.

I don’t know much about farming, but I do know a lot about community and bringing people together. I understand the importance of these simple joyful experiences that connect us.  This weekend it was playing in the mud building this tribute to Nigel. Seeing Joe out there seemed so fitting for a pizza oven. Joe and Jenny are the infamous sauce folks who use a drill on their Squeezo, and make over 80 quarts of sauce in a day!

Ted, aka Manhattan Man, who made me my first Manhattan ever! at a Sauce Party years ago, was there and full of energy. A few years back I had one of the best conversations with his daughter Izzy about people coming together around a table and connecting. They are one of the many family’s I always look forward to seeing every summer. Kirsty, one of our Vacaville hosts was the first to show up.  Kirsty has always been a person I can call and know she will have a recommendation (she recommended we buy an InstantPot) or ask for special things like beef bone broth or really whatever I might need. She has taught me so much about nutritionally dense food, and why the way we eat makes such an important difference.  Kirsty is a true wealth of knowledge and a tireless promoter of Eatwell Farm.

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In the afternoon Louise, our Albany host, and Kim brought up a group of girls who planned on helping out and camping out on the farm.  How great is it that these moms spent their weekend with this group of girls to get hot, and dirty working on the farm! Louise’s husband Paolo and their youngest daughter Julianna joined us for the afternoon. Miguel taught us a couple of African songs which we also sang while slapping Cobb all over the oven. The girls worked hard.  They got up the next morning, and after a good breakfast we went out to finish up the weekend’s work.  Thinking about it, we had a group of teenagers volunteering in the heat and never heard a complaint.  Just goes to show you, we can’t fall for the commonly held opinions of young people! I am so very grateful that Andrew and Eric were here on Sunday to give us the extra bit of “man power”.  Their height and muscles were greatly needed and appreciated.  And I think it was a little healing for them too, to work on a project that was one of their dad’s long time dreams.  

At one point Miguel pointed out that the base looked like elephant’s toes. I have a life long love relationship with elephants, and so the shape of it all was determined by that one little observation. As much as I am building this for Nigel, it seems even more fitting to have a part of me right there with him. Before Miguel left we started up the first fire.  Eric and Andrew tended the fire and kept it going for a few hours, which is all part of the drying/curing process.  Before we can complete this project, the Cobb has to be fully dried. Those young men have built many fires here for our overnight events so they have a “little” experience. A bittersweet moment watching them, seeing the men they are becoming and knowing how proud their dad would be right now.  

So to wrap up this long winded, unusual newsletter, I want to remind you all, everyone is invited to the memorial June 17th.  It looks like it will be a great year for garlic braiding as the weather has been kind to us this Spring. Lilly is learning/practicing how to make Lavender Wands which she would like to share with everyone. You do not have to stay for the memorial Sunday afternoon, you can camp out Saturday, enjoy a good breakfast here and head home if you like, or you can stay for the memorial.  Just come on out, it is one of the best times to come to the farm.

Sorry for this non-farming newsletter, and thank you all for allowing me this space to share.

 

This Week's Box: June 4th- June 10th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

 

Collards- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last 3-5 days.

*Basil- Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week.

*Broccoli- Place in a breathable container or wrap in a damp towel before placing in the fridge. Lasts 1-2 weeks.  

Turnips- Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an open container with a moist cloth.

Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week. 

*Spring Garlic- Wrap the green garlic in a damp paper towel and place it in a plastic bag. Should last 5-7 days. 

*Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*New Potatoes- Store potatoes in a cool, well-ventilated place. Don't wash the potatoes before storing as dampness promotes early spoilage. Will last at least one week.

*Parsley- Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

*Cherries- cherries in the fridge as soon as possible, preferably wrapped in a plastic bag. Wash them with cold water just before eating. Lasts in fridge up to 10 days. Can last in freezer up to 6 months.

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Salmon with Parsley Sauce

“Creamed” Collard Greens with Peanut Butter and Chiles

Raclette For Dinner

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Salmon with Parsley Sauce

4 tsp Capers

1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

2 lbs Salmon Fillets, cut in 6 portions

1 TB fresh Lemon Juice

Shopping list for “Creamed” Collard Greens with Peanut Butter and Chiles

1 cup dried Shrimp

4 Scotch Bonnet or Habanero Chiles, stemmed, seeded, and finely chopped

1 1/2 medium Yellow Onions, (1 roughly chopped, 1/2 sliced into 1/4” thick rings)

1 Tomato, cored, seeded and roughly chopped - Since we don’t have ripe tomatoes yet I would use a little bit of my house made canned sauce

4 TB High Temp Vegetable Oil, the recipe calls for Red-Palm, but I would use Coconut instead

2 TB Tomato Paste - since I am planning on using my sauce I would skip this ingredient and cook my sauce down a bit

1/2 cup Natural Peanut butter

Kosher Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

 

 

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Raclette For Dinner

Ellie gave me an early birthday present, a Raclette maker. If you are not familiar with this, it is an electric grill top that sits on the table.  It also has little trays that go underneath the heating elements. The grill top is where you cook vegetables and meats, we cooked slices of bacon the other night, but you can do sausage or chicken, really whatever you like.  The little trays are where you melt your Raclette cheese, we used Gruyere since we didn’t have any Raclette available.  This is typically enjoyed on boiled potatoes.  Now I realize you all aren’t going to rush out to buy a Raclette machine, but you can do much the same thing in the oven, it just isn’t as much fun:). So for this week you could roast up wedges of cabbage, that you toss in a bit of good olive oil and maybe some finely minced spring garlic.  You could include halved or quartered turnips on the tray, also tossed with a bit of olive oil.  Don’t forget to add a little salt and pepper, the Eatwell Farm Rosemary Salt is great for roasted veg.  Gently boil your well washed potatoes.  When they are cooked to tender drain very well, then put them onto a roasting pan, cover with a good melting cheese and put under the broiler for a quick minute or two, just until the cheese is melted.  Make a fresh green salad for the side, and a little meat if you want, or skip it for a meatless meal. It won’t be as fun as having your family sitting around the table with your Raclette centerpiece, but it will be simple and delicious!

 

“Creamed” Collard Greens with Peanut Butter and Chiles

Recipe from Saveur November 2015

I am always happy to find a recipe on Saveur because you can rely on them to come up with something interesting.  I love collards, but finding recipes beyond sautéing with ginger and garlic or the very traditional Southern style with bacon or hammock, can be a challenge.  This immediately caught my eye and it does sound really delicious, and you can use your turnip greens too.  I have had a dish similar to this one at a big annual African dinner we held in Sonoma County.  It was delicious!

2 lb Collard or Turnip Green leaves, roughly chopped (12 cups)

1 cup dried Shrimp

4 Scotch Bonnet or Habanero Chiles, stemmed, seeded, and finely chopped

1 1/2 medium Yellow Onions, (1 roughly chopped, 1/2 sliced into 1/4” thick rings)

1 Tomato, cored, seeded and roughly chopped - Since we don’t have ripe tomatoes yet I would use a little bit of my house made canned sauce

4 TB High Temp Vegetable Oil, the recipe calls for Red-Palm, but I would use Coconut instead

2 TB Tomato Paste - since I am planning on using my sauce I would skip this ingredient and cook my sauce down a bit

1/2 cup Natural Peanut butter

Kosher Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

Bring 2 cups water to a boil in a large saucepan and season with salt.  Add the collard greens, cover, and cook until the leaves are tender and wilted, about 5 minutes.  Drain the leaves in a colander set over a bowl and reserve 1 cup of the cooking liquid.  Place the leaves and reserved liquid in a blender, puree until smooth, and scrape the paste into a bowl.  Clean the blender and return it to its base.  In the blender, combine  the dried shrimp with three-quarters of the chiles, half the chopped onion, and the fresh tomato and puree until smooth.  In a large saucepan, heat 2 TB oil over medium high.  Add the remaining half of the chopped onion and the tomato paste and cook, stirring constantly, until the onions are soft and lightly caramelized, 6 to 8 minutes.  Scrape the shrimp and tomato paste into the pan, reduce the heat to medium, and cook, stirring until lightly caramelized, about 5 minutes.  Remove the pan from the heat, stir in the pureed collard greens and peanut butter, and mash until evenly combined.  Season the greens with salt and pepper and scrape into a serving dish.  In a 10” skillet, heat the remaining 2 TB of oil over high, add the onion rings, and cook, stirring, until soft and slightly caramelized, about 5 minutes.  Arrange the onion rings over the collards and garnish with the remaining chile.

 

 

Salmon with Parsley Sauce

Recipe found in NYT Cooking by Florence Fabricant

3 TB finely chopped Flat-leaf Parsley

4 tsp Capers

1 TB finely minced Scallion - use the Garlic Chives instead

1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

2 lbs Salmon Fillets, cut in 6 portions

Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

1 TB fresh Lemon Juice

Combine the parsley, capers, scallion and garlic in a bowl.  Stir in half the olive oil.  Set aside.  Preheat a broiler or grill.  Brush the salmon with the remaining oil and broil or grill close to the source of heat about two minutes on each side for medium rare, or to desired degree of doneness.  Remove from the heat and allow to rest two minutes.  Season the salmon to taste with salt and pepper.  Add the lemon juice to the parsley mixture, drizzle or brush this mixture over the salmon and serve.  A great accompaniment for this dish would be the broccoli from this week’s share, simply lightly steamed. 

This Week's Box: May 28th- June 3rd

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Basil- Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week.

*Turnips- Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an open container with a moist cloth.

*Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week. 

Spring Garlic- Wrap the green garlic in a damp paper towel and place it in a plastic bag. Should last 5-7 days. 

Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*New Potatoes- Store potatoes in a cool, well-ventilated place. Don't wash the potatoes before storing as dampness promotes early spoilage. Will last at least one week.

Parsley- Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

*Kale- Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

*Cherries- cherries in the fridge as soon as possible, preferably wrapped in a plastic bag. Wash them with cold water just before eating. Lasts in fridge up to 10 days. Can last in freezer up to 6 months.

*Oranges, Valencia- Valencia Oranges are available outside of the regular citrus season and are known for their high juice content. One of the best oranges for juicing. Don't be deterred if you see a tinge of green on these oranges - it is caused by chlorophyll to help protect the oranges from sunburn. Green-tinged oranges are ripe and still taste sweet. Will last much longer in the fridge, up to two weeks.

Rosemary- To keep green: wrap in a damp paper towel and store in a plastic bag in the fridge. Lasts one week or more. To dry, leave bound around the stems and hang - last 2 weeks to a month.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Herbed Honey Mustard Dressing

Creamy Herb Dressing

Orecchiette with Caramelized Turnips and Kale

Roasted New Potatoes

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Herbed Honey Mustard Dressing

1/2 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1/4 cup White Wine Vinegar

1 TB Honey

1 TB Dijon Mustard

1 tsp Shallots, chopped

Shopping list for Creamy Herb Dressing

1/2 cup Sour Cream or Yogurt

1/4  cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 TB White Wine Vinegar

1 Lemon Juiced

Optional: 1/2 Green Onion, mainly the white part and some green, about 2-3 TB

Shopping list for Orecchiette with Caramelized Turnips and Kale

1 lb Orecchiette

1/4 cup Vegetable Oil

1/2 tsp Red Pepper Flakes

8 TB unsalted Butter

2/3 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese, plus extra for garnish

Shopping list for

1/8 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

 

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Herbed Honey Mustard Dressing

Recipe from Live Simple

1/2 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1/4 cup chopped: Parsley, Basil, Dill, Thyme or combination of herbs

1/4 cup White Wine Vinegar

1 TB Honey

1 TB Dijon Mustard

1 tsp Shallots, chopped

Add all the ingredients to the bowl of a food processor.  Pulse for 1 minute until the herbs are finely chopped.  Store the dressing in the fridge for up to 2 weeks.

Orecchiette with Caramelized Turnips and Kale

Recipe from The Vermont Farm Table Cookbook by Tracey Medeiros

Salt

1 lb Orecchiette

1/4 cup Vegetable Oil

1 bunch Turnips, peeled (I usually don’t peel ours) cut into 1/4” dice

1 lb Kale, stems and center ribs removed, roughly chopped 

1 stalk Garlic, minced

1/2 tsp Red Pepper Flakes

Freshly cracked Black Pepper

8 TB unsalted Butter

2/3 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano Cheese, plus extra for garnish

Bring 6 quarts salted water to a boil in a large pot over medium-high heat.  Add the pasta and cook until al dente, about 8 minutes.  Drain the pasta, reserving 3/4 cup of the pasta water.  Set aside.  Meanwhile, heat the oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat until hot but not smoking.  Add the turnips and reduce the heat to medium.  Cook, stirring often, until the turnips are tender and golden, about 6 minutes.  Add the kale and cook, stirring often, until the kale is very tender, about 8 minutes.  Add the garlic and red pepper flakes, and cook, stirring often, 1 minute.  Add the reserved pasta water as needed and season with cracked pepper to taste.  Add the butter and stir gently until melted.  Add the pasta to the kale mixture and toss with tongs until the pasta is well coated.  Stir in the Parmigiano-Reggiano.  Season with salt and additional cracked pepper to taste.  Divide the pasta into warm bowls, sprinkle with additional cheese, if desired, and serve.

 

 

Roasted New Potatoes

Recipe from Ina Garten

1 1/2 lb Potatoes

1/8 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

3/4 tsp Salt

1/2 tsp freshly ground Black Pepper

1 to 2 TB minced Spring Garlic

2 TB minced Rosemary

Preheat the oven to 400 F.  Cut the potatoes in half or quarters and place in a bowl with the olive oil, salt, pepper, garlic and rosemary; toss until the potatoes are well coated.  Dump the potatoes on a baking sheet and spread out into 1 layer; roast in the oven for at least 1 hour, or until browned and crisp.  Flip twice with a spatula during cooking to ensure even browning.  Remove the potatoes from the oven, season to taste, and serve.

 

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