This Week's Box: May 14th- May 20th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Strawberries- Discard any bruised strawberries or freeze and use in a smoothie. Do not rinse until ready to eat. Strawberries don’t like to be wet. Keeps 2-3 days.

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Collards- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last 3-5 days.

*Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

Turnips- Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an open container with a moist cloth.

Green Garlic- Wrap the green garlic in a damp paper towel and place it in a plastic bag. Should last 5-7 days. 

Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*New Potatoes- Store potatoes in a cool, well-ventilated place. Don't wash the potatoes before storing as dampness promotes early spoilage. Will last at least one week.

*Parsley- Place in a glass with an inch of water in the fridge. Change water often. Can also be stored in a closed container in the fridge. Lasts up to one week.

*Kale- Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

*Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.  

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Savory Oatmeal with Greens and Yogurt

Gingered Collard Greens

Turnips Tzatziki

New Potatoes

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Savory Oatmeal with Greens and Yogurt

For the toasted Oat and Nut Topping:

1/4 cup Oats

1/4 cup slivered, raw Almonds

1/4 cup Pumpkin Seeds

1/4 cup Hemp Seed or Sunflower Seeds

1 tsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

For the Oatmeal:

1/2 cup Oats

Salt and Pepper

1 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

Pinch of crushed Red Pepper

Plain full fat Yogurt, preferable Bulgarian Yogurt, for garnish

Shopping list for Gingered Collard Greens

2 TB minced Garlic

2 TB minced fresh Ginger

Vegetable Oil, enough for sautéing 

Shopping list for Turnips Tzatziki

A splash of Apple Cider Vinegar (I use the vinegar we offer as an extra item from Little Apple)

A good glug of Olive Oil

2 TB of Yogurt, I used Greek Yogurt because that is what I had.

Shopping list for New Potatoes

2 TB Butter

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

New Potatoes

Here’s the thing about New Potatoes, the skin is very delicate, and the first few weeks of potatoes I don’t even consider a starch. They are so creamy and delicate and just a world different from what we are used to.

Wash them by soaking in water long enough to soften up the dirt and gently rub with your fingers. Enjoy them steamed or cooked on a low simmer.  

Eat them with butter and salt, maybe tossed with some of the Spring Garlic. This past weekend we made a version of Bubble and Squeak with a little bit of chopped, cooked bacon, and sautéed greens. For my Mother’s Day Dinner, Cameron made us a steak, with steamed potatoes and a fresh salad with that beautiful Red Lettuce that is coming out of the field right now. Keep your salad simple, with just a vinaigrette, and keep your potatoes simple.  This is the time of year to enjoy the produce for its amazing flavor and let it shine.

Turnips Tzatziki

I made this for our Strawberry this past Sunday and it was really tasty.  I did add radishes, and I really wish we had some in the box this week, but we don’t.  I think it would be fine without the radishes.  We used this as a crunchy little side to a frittata made with sautéed greens, eggs, salt and a little sautéed green garlic.  

1 bunch Turnips, washed well and cut into little matchsticks

1 small bulb of Fennel, chopped fairly fine

A splash of Apple Cider Vinegar (I use the vinegar we offer as an extra item from Little Apple)

A good glug of Olive Oil

Salt and Pepper, to taste

2 TB of Yogurt, I used Greek Yogurt because that is what I had.

1 TB Parsley, chopped

2 tsp Lemon Balm, chopped - optional

Mix everything together, taste and adjust.  You might want more of a bite so add a bit more vinegar, you might want it a bit more creamy, add some more olive oil.

Gingered Collard Greens

Recipe from Ike's Quarter Cafe in Nevada City

A few years ago Nigel and I went to Nevada City and ate at this restaurant.  The collards were amazingly delicious.  So I am bringing this recipe back for you all. 

2 TB minced Garlic

2 TB minced fresh Ginger

Vegetable Oil, enough for sautéing 

1 bunch Collard Greens, washed and chopped

Heat some oil in a skillet and sauté the garlic and ginger just until golden.  Add the collard greens.  Sauté quickly and ad add salt and pepper to taste.  Add a small amount of water anywhere from 1/4 to 1/2 cup.  Cover the skillet and cook for 2 to 10 minutes until tender.

 

Savory Oatmeal with Greens and Yogurt

Recipe from NYT by David Tannis

I love his simple approach to food.  This sounds like such a great alternative to sweet breakfast foods, and a different use for greens.  The original recipe used spinach, I chose chard, but you could use whatever greens you want.

For the toasted Oat and Nut Topping:

1/4 cup Oats

1/4 cup slivered, raw Almonds

1/4 cup Pumpkin Seeds

1/4 cup Hemp Seed or Sunflower Seeds

1/4 tsp Salt

1 tsp Extra Virgin Olive Oil

For the Oatmeal:

1/2 cup Oats

Salt and Pepper

1 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 stalk Spring Garlic, finely diced

Pinch of crushed Red Pepper

5 oz Chard leaves, washed, drained and chopped

Plain full fat Yogurt, preferable Bulgarian Yogurt, for garnish

 

Heat the oven to 350 F.  Make the toasted oat and nut topping: Mix the oats, almonds, pumpkin and hemp seeds together in a small bowl with salt and olive oil. Transfer to a baking sheet and bake for 10 minutes, or just until fragrant and lightly toasted. Make the oatmeal: In a small saucepan, bring 1 cup water to a boil, then add the oats and a pinch of salt.  Reduce to a low simmer, cover, and cook for 20 minutes.  Stir occasionally. Turn off the heat, cover pot, and let steam for an additional 10 minutes.  Meanwhile, prepare the greens: Heat about 1 TB of olive oil in a medium skillet over medium-high heat.  Once the oil begins to shimmer, add the garlic and crushed red pepper.  Don’t let the garlic burn.  Then add the greens, salt to taste, and cook to wilt.  Place the oatmeal in the bowl, surround with greens and pan juices, and garnish with about 1 TB toasted oat and nut topping.  Finish with a dollop of yogurt and freshly ground pepper.  Sprinkle with a little salt and a drizzle of olive oil if desired.  Store extra topping in an airtight contain er at room temp.  Keeps for about two weeks.

Students on the Farm

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This past week, we had two very different groups of students on the farm. Early in the week a small class of UC Davis Vet students were here to check out our chicken operation. It is always interesting to hear what they have to say about what they see on our farm. The primary questions they ask are around the topic of disease prevention and treatments. How do we treat, how do we prevent? We so seldom have issues with our birds, it isn’t much of a problem for us. The houses, the nest boxes, watering systems are all sanitized. We move the birds onto some fresh pasture, add rosemary extract to their water, along with grapefruit seed extract and sometimes Rescue Remedy. This all seems to do the trick.  Of course, we have also sent birds to Davis to be tested to find out what happened to them, but so far nothing really serious has occurred. I think they were surprised by all of this because it is fairly different from what they are taught and experience. How much of a difference does it make that our birds live outside in the fresh air, roaming the pasture, eating plants and bugs? Our girls look really happy, and healthy.

On Thursday a group of 6th graders from Prospect Sierra in El Cerrito came for a visit. They do a large farming project every year, and part of the visit includes an interview of the farmer. They come prepared with questions and followed a specific format. We all sat around my kitchen table while they interviewed me. One of the questions they asked was what is my favorite thing to do on the farm?  My answer was quick and simple, “this; what we are doing right now”. For me, there is no greater joy than sharing with our young friends the importance of eating fresh food. Explaining the freedom and joy one gets from knowing how to cook, and how that ability can literally change your life, is one of the most important things I can do with my life. We live in a world that constantly tells us cooking is drudgery, it is too expensive to eat healthy, buy this cheap unhappy meal instead. Share family time together while everyone eats their own frozen meal. And by the way, kids don’t like vegetables.  

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We have a lot of loud voices to overcome to make change, but working with young people is the best way I know to get there. Showing kids around the farm and letting them taste vegetables like chard and kale, that they just picked out in the field, opens their mind to completely new experiences. Set them loose in a strawberry field and tell them “YES, eat as many as you want!” Well, that is life changing. just ask the many young CSA members who come up every year for Strawberry Day, they know!

Eatwell Comes To The Bayview Community Market

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This past Saturday was the first Bayview Community Food Market at All Good Pizza. Eatwell CSA member Earl Shaddix has been working tirelessly to bring fresh food to his neighborhood, wrangling with the City to get this little market started. A big thank you to Earl for achieving this amazing task and to Kristen from All Good Pizza for opening her beautiful space, making us all feel so welcomed and feeding us pizza!  

To be honest, ever since I agreed to doing this, I felt like I was out of my mind. Seriously, what was I thinking?  We have strawberry days on three of the Sundays in May.  Then we have full weekend events the first 3 weeks of June.  How could adding a full day, doing a tiny little market in the Bayview make any sense in my life? Here is how it makes sense - that is one heck of a community! Our CSA dropsite is literally 1/2 block up the street. The people, many families with kids and dogs, came out and really showed their support and enthusiasm. I am sure this is what it must have felt like doing some of the early farmers markets in SF 25 years ago. I had the chance to meet and re-meet many of our CSA members, including our hosts at the Jerold St. house. We spoke with many people from the neighborhood who love the idea of joining our CSA and becoming members of our community. Meeting the other vendors in our small group was also a great way to make new connections. The owner of All Good Pizza, Kristen, is an Eatwell member too!  So you see, community and building it, makes some extra effort very worthwhile. Thanks to all of yo who came out to see and support us this past Saturday. We will be back this coming week, and I hope to see even more of you!

 

This Week's Box: May 7th- May 13th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Strawberries- Discard any bruised strawberries or freeze and use in smoothie. Do not rinse until ready to eat. Strawberries don’t like to be wet. Keeps 2-3 days.

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

Garlic Chives- Store in the refrigerator, wrapped in plastic. Should last 3-5 days.

*Collards- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last 3-5 days.

*Sugar Snap Peas- Keep them in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Sugar snap peas should last for up to 5 days.

Oregano- Place in a glass of water and cover with a plastic bag. Change water often. Will last up to 5 days.

*Turnips- Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an open container with a moist cloth.

Green Garlic- Wrap the green garlic in a damp paper towel and place it in a plastic bag. Should last 5-7 days.

*Leeks- These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

*Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

Kale- Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

*Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water.  

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Stuffed Collard Greens

Cheating Ramen

Cream of Turnip Soup

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Stuffed Collard Greens

1 lb Ground Beef

1 Small Onion

1/3 cup Parsley, fresh chopped

1/2 cup Pine Nuts, or chopped Hazelnuts

1 tsp Cumin, ground

1/4 tsp Cayenne Pepper

2/3 cup Beef Broth (I always replace the beef broth with our chicken since I have it handy)

1 tsp Salt and Pepper

Shopping list for Cheating Ramen

Toasted Sesame Oil

Soy Sauce

Korean barbeque Sauce-Spicey

Chicken Stock

Ramen Noodles, enough for 2

Optional, soft cooked Egg

Shopping list for Cream of Turnip Soup

5 TB Butter

Splash of Olive Oil for the pan

8 oz Chicken Stock

8 oz Milk

Lemon Zest, to taste

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Cream of Turnip Soup

Recipe inspired by Greens Cookbook

This is one of my favorite soups. I use our chicken stock in it and  less milk. I also changed it by adding 2 stalks of spring garlic.

1 bunch of Turnips, save the good looking leaves, trim and peel then slice into rounds

2 stalks Spring Garlic, minced

5 TB Butter

Splash of Olive Oil for the pan

8 oz Chicken Stock

8 oz Milk

Salt and Pepper, to taste

Lemon Zest, to taste

Heat the butter in a skillet, with a splash of oil to keep the butter from burning too quickly.  Add the sliced turnips and cook until they begin to soften a bit.  You don’t want them browned, so use a medium heat, or lower if you plan on walking away.  Add the minced garlic and cook another minute or two.  Then add the chicken stock and cook until the turnips are very soft.  Transfer it all to a pot appropriately sized for your soup.  Using an immersion blender purée the lot, add the milk, salt and pepper.  Taste and adjust seasoning, add more milk if it is thicker than you like.  You can also use cream instead of milk, using less, but then add more stock.  Once it is close to what you want, add a bit of lemon zest, taste and adjust if needed.  The saved turnip greens can be turned into a pesto which you could add a dollop of on your soup.  Google it, you will find loads of recipes!

Cheating Ramen

Last week I needed a lunch super fast.  I have organic ramen noodles at home so this is what I made:

1 bunch Bok Choy, bottoms separated from leafy tops

A handful of Sugar Snap Peas, topped and tailed and cut into a couple of pieces

A few leaves of Chard, chopped appropriately for soup

1 Leek, washed well, and chopped into thin half moons

Garlic Chives for garnish

Toasted Sesame Oil

Soy Sauce

Korean Barbque Sauce-Spicey

Chicken Stok

Ramen Noodles, enough for 2

Optional, soft cooked Egg

Heat the sesame oil in a pan, add the chopped leeks, sauté long enough to soften. It is getting late in the season for the leeks, so they need a little more cooking.  I often add a few tablespoons of water to the pan and cook them until that little bit of water has evaporated off.  Then turn up the heat and add the boy choy bottoms.  Give them a quick toss, add the chard.  Cook another minute or so, add the bok choy leaves and some of the barbeque sauce to taste and a splash of soy sauce.  I like my veg a bit more crunchy so I don’t cook any of this for too long.  Cook your ramen noodles according to instructions, OR like I do, in chicken broth.  Once the noodles are done, put them into a bowl with a good amount of broth, and a portion of the vegetables on top. Don’t forget to include the snap peas.  I like to keep them raw for the extra crunch. Mix it a bit and taste for seasoning, you can add more soy sauce or more spice.  Garnish with chopped garlic chives.   If you want you can poach two eggs onto of the ramen noodles as they are cooking, or gently fry eggs.

Stuffed Collard Greens

Recipe from Primal Palate

One of our CSA members who was up for Strawberry Day this past weekend told me she made stuffed collard greens and loved it. This isn’t her recipe, but I thought I would put one in this week for you, and hope she sends me her recipe soon! 

1 lb Ground Beef

8 Collard Green Leaves

1 Small Onion

2 Cloves Garlic, minced (I would use a few stalks of the Spring Garlic instead)

1/3 cup Parsley, fresh chopped

1/2 cup Pine Nuts, or chopped Hazelnuts

1 tsp Cumin, ground

1/4 tsp Cayenne Pepper

2/3 cup Beef Broth (I always replace the beef broth with our chicken since I have it handy)

1 tsp Salt and Pepper

Preheat oven to 390 F.  Set a large pot of water to boil.  Wash the collard greens and blanch them in the boiling water for 2 minutes.  Remove them from the pot and transfer them immediately to a large bowl of ice cold water to stop the cooking.  Finely chop the onion, garlic and parsley and incorporate them to the ground beef with the pine nuts and spices.  Season with salt and pepper.  Lay out 1 collard green on a board or a clean surface.  From a patty with 2 generous tablespoons of meat mixture and place it in the upper center of the leaf.  Fold the sides of the leaf towards the center on top of the patty, fold over the top and roll into a small package.  Repeat with each collard.  Gently place the stuffed collards in a baking dish, fill the bottom of the dish with the broth (it should come up to about 1/3 of the collards) and cover with aluminum foil.  Cook for 30 minutes, then uncover and roast for 5 more minutes.

Spring Cabbage

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So how does your cabbage grow?  In beautiful curving form, of course! I love to watch the evolution of cabbage, it really is an incredible slow motion show.  According to the weather app we should have mild temps for the next two weeks. If that holds, the cabbages will have a chance to develop.  Last year we went from too much rain to too much heat. This year we have had late frost and late rain. The Winter frost exploded many of the cabbages, which is why we didn’t have them in the CSA shares as much as I would have liked.  

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You can see in this photo of a red cabbage how the tightly formed head just bursts open. Very pretty for a photo, but no good for eating! We could use some mild Spring weather for a few weeks. If it gets really hot it stresses the plants. As it is we are pushing it with Spring Cabbage because of the heat. We might get lucky this year, and have cabbages later into the season than we normally expect.

This Week's Box: April 23rd - April 29th

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Garlic Chives- Store in the refrigerator, wrapped in plastic. Should last 3-5 days.

*Collards- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last 3-5 days.

Sugar Snap Peas- Keep them in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Sugar snap peas should last for up to 5 days.

*Oregano- Place in a glass of water and cover with a plastic bag. Change water often. Will last up to 5 days.

Turnips- Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an open container with a moist cloth.

*Kale and Chard- Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

*Oranges- Oranges- Keep in a dish on your counter or table. Lasts one week.

Green Garlic- Wrap the green garlic in a damp paper towel and place it in a plastic bag. Should last 5-7 days.

*Leeks- These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

*Carrots- Cut the tops off to keep them fresh longer. Place them in a closed container with plenty of moisture, either wrapped in a damp towel or dunk them in cold water every couple of days if they’re stored that long.

*Raisins- Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Greens With Green Garlic & Prosciutto

Buttered Snap Peas and Carrots

Green Shakshouka

Hot & Sour Bok Choy And Turnip Stir-Fry

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Greens With Green Garlic & Prosciutto

1 to 2 TB Olive Oil

2 slices Prosciutto

Lemon Juice, to taste

Shopping list for Buttered Snap Peas and Carrots

2 TB unsalted Butter

Shopping list for Green Shakshouka

1 tsp. cumin seeds

1/2 tsp. each coriander and fennel seeds

1 tsp. each smoked paprika and red chile flakes

1/4 tsp. each freshly ground pepper and cardamom 

6 TB EVOO

1 medium onion, chopped

3 garlic cloves, chopped

1 large jalapeno chile, seeded and diced

12 oz. or 1 1/4 cups tomato sauce

1 1/2 chicken stock, You can use Eatwell Farm’s Chicken Stock

7 oz. feta cheese, coarsely crumbled

1/2 cup flat leaf parsley, divided

3 TB chopped cilantro leaves

12 large eggs, You can use Eatwell Farm’s pasture-raised eggs

Shopping list for Hot & Sour Bok Choy And Turnip Stir-Fry

2 TB Sesame Oil

1/8 to 1/4 tsp Red Chili Flakes

1 TB Rice Vinegar

1 tsp Tamari or Soy Sauce

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Green Shakshouka

Recipe from Julia Lee, Sunset Magazine January 2018

Shared by CSA Member, Karen A.

 

1 3/4 lbs mixed greens (Kale, Chard, Collards)

1 tsp. cumin seeds

1/2 tsp. each coriander and fennel seeds

1 tsp. each smoked paprika and red chile flakes

1/4 tsp. each freshly ground pepper and cardamom 

6 TB EVOO

1 medium onion, chopped

3 garlic cloves, chopped

1 large jalapeno chile, seeded and diced

12 oz. or 1 1/4 cups tomato sauce

1 1/2 chicken stock, You can use Eatwell Farm’s Chicken Stock

1 tsp salt

7 oz. feta cheese, coarsely crumbled

1/2 cup flat leaf parsley, divided

3 TB chopped cilantro leaves

12 large eggs, You can use Eatwell Farm’s pasture-raised eggs

 

Preheat oven to 375F. Remove stems and large ribs from greens and finely chop, set aside. Coarsely chop leaves and set aside.

Toast cumin, coriander, and fennel in a small frying pan over medium heat until fragrant, 1 to 2 minutes. Grind seeds with mortar and pestle. Add paprika, chile flakes, pepper and cardamom; set aside. Set a 9 x 13 inch baking dish in oven to heat. Heat oil in a 6 to 8 qt pot over medium high heat. Add onion and chopped stems. Cook, stirring often, until golden brown, about 10 minutes. Stir in garlic, jalapeños and spices. Add half the greens; cook until barely wilted. 

Stir tomato sauce, broth, and salt into greens and bring to a boil. Reduce heat to medium-low, partially cover, and cook until greens are just tender, about 5 to 7 minutes. Set aside 3 TB feta cheese and 1 TB each of parsley and cilantro; stir rest into greens.

Arrange greens in preheated dish. Nestle eggs into greens. Bake until egg whites are just set, 10-15 minutes. Scatter reserved feta, parsley, and cilantro on top. Serve.

 

Buttered Snap Peas and Carrots

Recipe from Martha Stewart

1 lb Carrots, tops trimmed and sliced lengthwise in half or quarters

3/4 lb Snap Peas

2 TB unsalted Butter

Coarse Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

2 TB Garlic Chives, chopped

 

In a large straight-sided skillet, bring 1/2 cup water to a simmer over medium.  Add carrots, cover, and cook 3 minutes.  Add snap peas, cover, and cook until vegetables are crisp-tender, about 4 minutes.  Add butter and cook, stirring, until butter melts and coats vegetables.  Season with salt and pepper.  To serve, sprinkle with chives.

Hot & Sour Bok Choy And Turnip Stir-Fry

Recipe from the Natural Gourmet Institute

 

2 TB Sesame Oil

1 medium Leek, white part sliced into half-moon

3 stalks Green Garlic, while bulbs minced

1/8 to 1/4 tsp Red Chili Flakes

4 Turnips, sliced into half moons

1 lb Bok Choy, leaves ands tens chopped separately

1 TB Rice Vinegar

1 tsp Tamari or Soy Sauce

1 ounce Scallions, sliced OR use Garlic Chives

 

Heat sesame oil in a sauce pan.  Add leek and sauté until translucent, about 5 minutes.  Stir in garlic and chili flakes.  Add turnips and bok choy stems; saute over high heat until tender about 7 minutes.  Add bok choy greens, rice vinegar and Tamara.  Cook for 1 to 2 minutes, until greens are wilted.  Garnish with scallions and serve.

Greens With Green Garlic & Prosciutto

Recipe by Molly Watson from The Spruce Eats website

Sometimes the perfect recipe pops up in a search, and such is the case with this one.  I was actually looking for some information and ideas for green garlic and this recipe was listed, how perfect.  And after my trip to Italy, anything with Prosciutto sounds good to me.

 

1 bunch Collard Greens, or Kale, or Swiss chard

3 Green Garlic Stalks

1 to 2 TB Olive Oil

1/8 tsp Sea Salt, plus more to taste

2 slices Prosciutto

Lemon Juice, to taste

Dash of freshly ground Black Pepper

 

Cut out the thick stems from the greens (I usually use my stems, by cutting them very small and cooking them a bit before I put the leaves in the pan). Rinse the leaves clean of any dirt or grit. Shake off any excess water.  Lay the leaves in a stack and cut them into thin ribbons, or you can simply rough chop.  Set aside. Trim the green garlic, discarding any yellowed or browned parts, and finely chop them.  Finely chop the prosciutto as well. Heat a large frying pan, with a fitting lid, over medium-high heat.  Add the oil. Swirl the pan so the oil coats the bottom of the pan.  When the oil is hot, add the green garlic and salt.  Cook, stirring, until the green garlic is wilted, about 1 minute. Add the prosciutto, if using, and cook, stirring, until it loses it bright pink tone, about 1 minute.  Add the prosciutto, if using, and cook, stirring, until it loses its bright pink tone, about 1 minute. Add the greens, they should still have a bit of water clinging to them, which a good thing, and stir to combine them with the green garlic and prosciutto.  There should be a bit of water on the bottom of the pan, if there isn’t, add a tablespoon or so.  Cover, reduce heat to medium low and cook until the green are well wilted, about 3 minutes. Stir again, cover, and cook until the greens are tender. Depending on the greens used, this will take anywhere from 3 minutes for chard, and up to 8 minutes for the heartier collard greens.  Add salt, pepper and lemon juice to taste, as you like Serve hot or warm.  Fee free to use a slice of bacon instead of prosciutto; you’ll just need to cook it before anything else. Depending on how much fat it renders, you can use the bacon fat instead of the cooking oil for greens with tons of flavor!

This Week's Box: April 16th - April22nd

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Garlic Chives- Store in the refrigerator, wrapped in plastic. Should last 3-5 days.

Collards- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Do not wash until ready to use. Will last 3-5 days.

*Sugar Snap Peas- Keep them in a plastic bag in the refrigerator. Sugar snap peas should last for up to 5 days.

Kale- Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

Stir Fry Mix- These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

*Oranges- Oranges- Keep in a dish on your counter or table. Lasts one week.

Radishes- Remove the greens (store separately) so they don't draw out excess moisture from the roots. Place them in an open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top. Lasts up to one week. 

Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

Green Garlic- Wrap the green garlic in a damp paper towel and place it in a plastic bag. Should last 5-7 days.

Leeks- These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

Carrots- Cut the tops off to keep them fresh longer. Place them in a closed container with plenty of moisture, either wrapped in a damp towel or dunk them in cold water every couple of days if they’re stored that long.

Raisins- Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

 

Kale Lasagna

Sauteed Radishes and Sugar Snap Peas With Dill

 

Turnip Fritters

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Kale Lasagna

Olive Oil, for coating baking dish

9 to 12 Lasagna Noodles

1 cup Ricotta Cheese

1 Egg

1/4 cup grated Parmigiano-Reggiano

Zest of 1 fresh Lemon

1/2 tsp Kosher or Sea Salt 

Fresh cracked Black Pepper, to taste

24 oz Tomato Sauce, now don’t you wish you came to a sauce party!

16 oz Grated Mozzarella Cheese

Shopping list for Sauteed Radishes and Sugar Snap Peas With Dill

1 TB butter

1 Tb Olive Oil

1/2 cup thinly sliced Shallots - I am going to use a leek in place of the shallots.

1/4 cup Orange Juice

1 tsp Dill Seeds

1 TB chopped fresh Dill

Shopping list for Turnip Fritters

1 Egg, beaten

3/4 cup All-Purpose Flour - I used Potato Starch instead to keep it gluten free

1 good sized Leek, cut into thin half moon slices

1/2 tsp Kosher Salt and several grind of Black Pepper

Vegetable Oil

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Turnip Fritters

Recipe by Kevin Lee Jacobs

The original recipe calls for parsley, but I switched it to leeks. I found the turnips gave off quite a bit of liquid, so next time I will let them sit in a strainer for a couple of minutes and give them a good squeeze before adding the rest of the ingredients.

2 lbs Turnips, peeled and shredded

1 Egg, beaten

3/4 cup All-Purpose Flour - I used Potato Starch instead to keep it gluten free

1 good sized Leek, cut into thin half moon slices

1/2 tsp Kosher Salt and several grind of Black Pepper

Vegetable Oil - enough to reach half-way up the sides of the patties as they fry

 

Put the turnips, egg, flour and leeks into a large bowl, admix with hands.  Heat a generous amount of oil in a large skillet over a medium flame.  For the turnip mixture into patties, and fry until bronzed and fragrant, about 4 to 5 minutes per side.

 

Sauteed Radishes and Sugar Snap Peas With Dill

Recipe from Bon Appetit

1 TB butter

1 Tb Olive Oil

1/2 cup thinly sliced Shallots - I am going to use a leek in place of the shallots.

12 oz Sugar Snap Peas, trimmed, strings removed

2 cups thinly sliced Radishes 

1/4 cup Orange Juice

1 tsp Dill Seeds

1 TB chopped fresh Dill

 

Melt butter with oil in large skillet over medium heat.  Add shallots and sauce util golden, about 5 minutes.  Add sugar snap peas and radishes; sauce until crisp-tender, about 5 minutes.  Add orange juice and dill seeds; stir 1 minute.  Season with salt and pepper.  Stir in chopped dill. Transfer to bowl; serve.

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