Sweet Potatoes

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Last Spring, after the Sweet Potatoes went into the ground, the folks from Terra Firma asked how our planting was doing. They were only getting about a 30% take of their planting, Jose said that was about where we were also. I looked at the field about 2 months ago and saw beautiful, full, lush plants. Sweet Potatoes started coming in (always a very exciting time for me because I LOVE our’s) and they were huge!  

As a ‘non-farmer’ farmer, it looked like the crop was great, but then I started wondering why they were so giant. I called Paul at Terra Firma to ask him how their’s were doing. They had plowed their field some months ago; it wasn’t worth keeping them. He explained that when there is the space, the plants on top will grow big and lush and fill out the field. The sweet potatoes also grow too big and you end up with a bunch of honkers. 

A bit of a “duh” moment since that makes perfect sense. I realize there are so many things we take for granted, and there is just so much to learn. But the fact is with every bit of information we do learn it means we look at other things around the farm a little bit differently, and as time goes on, the learning becomes easier. In the meantime, I am grateful we have our delicious sweet potatoes, honkers or not, and am really looking forward to some Sweet Potato Pie.

 

The Sweet Smell of Soil

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I was out on the farm this Sunday morning checking on the chickens. Right next to them is a field that must have been cultivated yesterday. It was relatively early, so the sun hadn’t yet heated the day. As I walked out onto the field, the smell of fresh, fertile soil was so strong and sweet. To me, that smell now represents fertility, health, and a promise of good food to come.

It is interesting how we acclimate to our environment.  Cities smell so completely different to a farm. When I walk down the canal road I realize there is no smell coming from our neighbor’s field, which will lie fallow until next spring.  As I walk further down the canal, there are mornings when I smell the application of RoundUp, or some other type of chemical. In the summer, as they harvest the tomatoes, we are often blessed with the smell of fermenting tomatoes.  That smell is the signal that the flies will get bad really soon.

One of the most interesting smells on the farm is a particular day in summer, usually late July.  The sky looks different, the sun looks different, and the air smells different. For me it is always a signal that summer is speeding past us and fall will be here soon. I can’t really describe it, but it happens every year.  Autumn is here, the leaves are beginning to turn, and the soil smells wonderful.

This Week's Box: October 16th- October 22nd

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Mizuna- Mizuna will keep in the refrigerator for up to 5 days. Rinse and dry the leaves before refrigerating. Wrap them in a paper towel and store them in a plastic bag.

Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in the fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*Kale- Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

*Leeks- Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

Stir Fry Mix- These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

Peppers- Only wash them right before you plan on eating them as moisture decreases storage time. Store in a cool room to use in a couple of days, place in the crisper if longer storage is needed. Lasts up to one week. 

Tomatoes - Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness, place in a paper bag with an apple.

*Squash- Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place. Many growers say squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

*Raisins- Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

*Pomegranate- Keeps up to a month stored on a cool counter.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Miso Noodle Soup

Lilly’s Pepper/Onion/Tomato Sauté

Warm Wilted Greens

Roasted Tomato Mac and Cheese

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for Miso Noodle Soup:

4 cloves Garlic, minced

2 TB grated Ginger

Rice Stir Fry Noodles

Miso Paste

(Optoinal: Tamari or Soy Sauce, Rice Vinegar, Sriracha Hot Sauce, Ume Plum Vinegar, Sesame Seed or Gomasio)

Shopping list for Roasted Tomato Mac and Cheese:

Cooking Spray or Oil

2 TB All-Purpose Flour

2 TB Butter, softened

4 cups Chicken Stock

3 cups Milk, divided

3/4 tsp Dijon Mustard

18 oz Elbow Noodles

4 1/2 (1/2 package) frozen Artichoke Hearts

6 oz Sharp Cheddar Cheese (about 1 1/2 cups)

3 oz Fontina Cheese (about 3/4 cup)

2 1/2 oz Parmesan Cheese (about 10 TB)

Shopping list for Warm Wilted Greens:

1/4 cup honey

1/2 cup balsamic vinegar

1/2 pint walnuts

1 tablespoon grainy mustard

Extra-virgin olive oil

Parmesan shavings

1 shallot

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Miso Noodle Soup

Recipe from earlymorningfarm.com

I love miso soup. It is such a great go to during the colder months, and the perfect way to use up many vegetables that come in the CSA Share for the next several months.  

In this recipe you can us the Stir Fry Mix, Mizuna, Bok Choy, Chard, even cubes of Butternut Squash, which would add a nice sweetness and would make a good substitute for carrots.

4 to 6 cups thinly sliced vegetables (see veggies above)

4 cloves Garlic, minced

2 TB grated Ginger

2 to 4 quarts Water

Rice Stir Fry Noodles

Miso Paste, 1 TB per serving

Condiments: You can add/include if you like: Tamari or Soy Sauce, Rice Vinegar, Sriracha Hot Sauce, Ume Plum Vinegar, Sesame Seed or Gomasio.

Fill a large stockpot 3/4 of the way with water.  Bring to a boil.  While the water is heating, prep the vegetables.  Once the water is boiling add garlic and ginger, then vegetables in order of cooking times.  So add whatever takes the longest to cook first, give it a couple of minutes, then add the next items, etc.  When the vegetables are done, add the rice noodles and cook according to package directions.  Remove soup from stove.  Place about 1 TB miso past in each bowl.  Ladle some cooking water over the paste to dissolve.  Once paste is dissolved ladle soup into each bowl.  Bring a variety of condiments to the table for serving.  From this basic recipe you could add bits of leftover meat if you have some in the fridge, like steak or chicken, or fish.  Small cubes of tofu would also be delicious.

Warm Wilted Greens

Recipe by Tyler Florence

1/4 cup honey

1/2 cup balsamic vinegar

1/2 pint walnuts, for garnish

2 bunches assorted greens (such as chard, lettuce or kale), washed, stemmed, and torn into pieces

1 tablespoon grainy mustard

Extra-virgin olive oil

1/2 cup pomegranate seeds, for garnish

Parmesan shavings, for garnish

1 shallot, chopped, for garnish

Cook honey and balsamic together over medium-high heat in a large saute pan, about 5 minutes. Toast walnuts in a small skillet; set aside to cool.

Pile greens on a platter. Stir mustard into balsamic-honey dressing, then whisk in about 1 cup extra-virgin olive oil; pour over greens. Season greens with salt and pepper and garnish with walnuts, pomegranate seeds, shavings of Parmesan, and shallot.

Roasted Tomato Mac and Cheese

Recipe by Maureen Callahan from Cooking Light

Cooking Spray or Oil

5 San Marzanos, cut into 1/2” thick slices (about 16 slices)

2 TB All-Purpose Flour

2 TB Butter, softened

4 cups Chicken Stock

3 cups Milk, divided 

3/4 tsp Salt

3/4 tsp Dijon Mustard

18 oz Elbow Noodles

4 1/2 (1/2 package) frozen Artichoke Hearts, thawed and halved 

6 oz Sharp Cheddar Cheese, shredded (about 1 1/2 cups)

3 oz Fontina Cheese, shredded (about 3/4 cup)

2 1/2 oz Parmesan Cheese, grated and divided (about 10 TB)

1/2 tsp freshly ground Black Pepper

 

Remove top oven rack, and cover with foil; lightly coat with cooking spray.  Preheat broiler to high.  Arrange tomato slices on prepared rack; lightly coat with cooking spray.  Broil 8 to 10 minutes or until tomatoes are lightly browned.  Transfer tomatoes to a plate; set aside.  Combine flour and butter in a bowl until a paste forms.  Place a large high-sided sauté pan over medium-high heat.  Add stock, 2 cups milks, salt, and mustard, stirring with a whisk.  Add pasta to pan; bring to a boil.  Cook 12 minutes or until pasta is done, stirring frequently.  Stir in remaining 1 cup milk and artichokes; cook 2 minutes.  Add butter-flour paste, in pieces, stirring constantly to blend and thicken.  Remove from heat stir in cheddar, fontina, 6 TB Parmesan, and pepper.  Arrange broiled tomato slices on top of pasta.  Sprinkle with remaining 4 TB Parmesan.  Broil 2 minutes or until cheese begins to brown.

Lilly’s Pepper/Onion/Tomato Sauté

Lilly has been sautéing the Lunchbox Peppers with onion and tomatoes. We keep a container of this in the fridge, and we add it to eggs or enjoy it as a side dish.  Last night I included it as one of the topping on our pizza. It can be eaten cold or hot, it’s versatile, and a delicious leftover. If you don’t eat all of your peppers raw (stuffed with tuna salad is my personal favorite!), then I highly recommend using these share ingredients this way. Simply use the amounts provided in the CSA Share:

Lunchbox Peppers

Leeks or Onions

Tomatoes

Heat a sauté pan with some oil of your choice, add leeks or onions, sauté until they soften a bit.  Slice or chop tomatoes and peppers how you would like them, then add to the onion/leeks in the pan.  You can add a little grated garlic and or basil or other herb.  Sauté on medium low until everything is soft and almost melty.

Community, Food, Spirit, Prayers, Music & Dance

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It is impossible for me to describe the experience of what was shared on the farm the past few days.  I have written about Sukkot, the Jewish holiday celebrating the harvest, and I have written about Wilderness Torah, and their earth based approach to Judaism.  As a non-Jew, I am very much an observer at this gathering; but as the one who is now responsible for this land and the path our farm takes, I get to play an integral part of Sukkot.  This year I had the opportunity to join the community, and in turn they honored and comforted me.  

 

Over the past week I watched the setup team build the village.  People worked together for days to create a space for community, a space for reflection, for healing, for stillness, for prayer, and for song and dance in celebration of the blessings of life and the land.  The Sukkah was beautiful, willow branches and bamboo adorned the ceiling, twinkle lights represented the stars of heaven.   In the evenings we gathered for the prayers and blessings.  We also remembered those who have left us this past year; Nigel featured rather prominently.  Saturday night a band came in and played beautiful music; people danced into the night.  When the band finished, the music continued with people singing in the Tea Tent. 

 

One early morning I took a few people out for a walk around the farm.  As we typically do with farm walks, we ended in the strawberry field, to enjoy the sweet, red berries.   I heard one of the little ones tell their parent they never liked strawberries, but they LOVED Eatwell Strawberries.

 

The Hearth Staff worked tirelessly day and night preparing food.  Every day we had delicious meals prepared for us, and for 200 people a few times a day, that is a lot of work!  I loved sneaking in to take a peak at all the goings on.  Their set up was incredible, really organized and a fly net system that seemed to work amazingly well! 

 

 

As with all events, by the time it is near the end, I am pretty exhausted, Sukkot was no exception.  But now that the farm is quiet, and I am adjusting to not having a “village” set up next to my home, I have time to reflect all that happened over the whirlwind of the past few days.  Whether you are a believer or not, it is hard not to feel the power with this type of spirituality, that is open and accepting to all.  Something happens when people gather as a group offering thanks for the land that nourishes us, and thanks for those who work so hard to bring us that food.  I feel immense gratitude to have had the chance toshare in all of it, and to play my own part.  

Taking a Goosey Risk

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Just before she left, Connie and I walked the farm.  We were looking at a row Nigel put in a few years ago, one of his Permaculture experiments.  He planted a row of stone fruit, then a couple of rows of herbs - mint, lavender and sage, followed by another row of stone fruit.  This past year the mint did not do well, maybe because of the longer rainy season?  Don’t know.  The weeds, however, loved the extra rain, and had completely taken over the area.  So I thought I would take a gamble and move the geese on in, and see what they do with it all.  The setup we have for the geese allows us to move them into smaller, more targeted areas.  With the geese, we don’t have to mow taller grasses, because they eat most of them.  The risk was would they eat all of the mint? The lavender?  Or the sage?  Walking out there the other day I was very happy to see they don’t like mint, lavender or sage!  The weeds are just about all eaten down to the ground, and the geese are fertilizing along the way.  A bit of a risk, but so far it seems to have paid off.

This Week's Box: October 9th- October 15th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in the fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

*Stir Fry Mix- These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

*Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water. 

Radish- Store radishes in a plastic bag in the crisper of the refrigerator and they should keep for at least a week. If your radishes have leaves attached, it is best to remove them, as they tend to leach moisture from the root.

Peppers- Only wash them right before you plan on eating them as moisture decreases storage time. Store in a cool room to use in a couple of days, place in the crisper if longer storage is needed. Lasts up to one week. 

*Tomatoes - Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness, place in a paper bag with an apple.

*Squash- Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place. Many growers say squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

Raisins- Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

Sweet Potatoes- Store in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate ‐ sweet potatoes don't like the cold. Lasts up to 3 weeks if stored properly. 

*Pomegranate- Keeps up to a month stored on a cool counter.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Fennel and Feta with Pomegranate Seeds and Sumac

Buttered Prawns with Tomatoes, Olives and Arak

Cinnamon Raisin Butternut Squash Bread

Danielle’s Sweet Potato Gratin

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for Fennel and Feta with Pomegranate Seeds and Sumac

1 1/2 TB Olive Oil

2 tsp Sumac, plus extra to garnish

Juice of 1 Lemon

4 TB Tarragon leaves

2 TB roughly chopped Flat-Leaf Parsley

1/2 cup Greek Feta, sliced

Shopping list for Buttered Prawns with Tomatoes, Olives and Arak

3 to 4 softened unsalted Butter

1/2 tsp dried Chili Flakes

2 oz Kalamata Olives, pitted

1 1/2 TB Arak or Pernod

3 Garlic cloves

2 TB chopped Flat-leaf Parsley

Shopping list for Cinnamon Raisin Butternut Squash Bread

4 eggs

1/3 cup applesauce

2 1/2 cups almond meal

1 tbs almond milk

1 tsp baking powder

1 tbs cinnamon

Shopping list for Danielle’s Sweet Potato Gratin

5TB roughly chopped Sage, plus extra to garnish

6 Garlic cloves

1 cup Whipping Cream

Shopping list for all recipes: 

5TB roughly chopped Sage, plus extra to garnish

4 eggs

1/3 cup applesauce

2 1/2 cups almond meal 

1 tbs almond milk

1 tsp baking powder

1 tbs cinnamon

1 cup Whipping Cream

3 to 4 softened unsalted Butter

1/2 tsp dried Chili Flakes

2 oz Kalamata Olives, pitted

1 1/2 TB Arak or Pernod

9 Garlic cloves

1 1/2 TB Olive Oil

2 tsp Sumac, plus extra to garnish

1 Lemon

4 TB Tarragon leaves

1 bunch Flat-Leaf Parsley

1/2 cup Greek Feta, sliced

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Fennel and Feta with Pomegranate Seeds and Sumac

Recipe from Ottolenghi by Yotam Ottolenghi

1/2 Pomegranate

2 medium Fennel Heads

1 1/2 TB Olive Oil

2 tsp Sumac, plus extra to garnish

Juice of 1 Lemon

4 TB Tarragon leaves

2 TB roughly chopped Flat-Leaf Parsley

1/2 cup Greek Feta, sliced

Salt and Black Pepper

Start by releasing the pomegranate seeds. The best way to it is to halve the pomegranate along its belly (you will only need 1/2), then hold the half firmly in your hand with the seeds facing your palm.  Over a large bowl, start bashing the back of the fruit with a wooden spoon.  Don’t hit too hard or you’ll bruise the seeds and break the skin.  Magically, the seeds will just fall out.  Pick out any white skin that falls in.  Remove the leaves of the fennel, keeping a few to garnish later and trim the base, making sure you leave enough of it still attached to hold the slices together. Slice very thinly lengthwise (a mandolin would come in handy). In a bowl, mix the olive oil, sumac, lemon juice, herbs and some salt and pepper.  Add the fennel and toss well.  Taste for seasoning but remember, the feta will add saltiness.  Layer the fennel, then the feta and then the pomegranate seeds in individual serving dishes.  Garnish with fennel leaves, sprinkle over some sumac and serve immediately.

 

Cinnamon Raisin Butternut Squash Bread

Recipe from Sarah at BelliniBootcamp

2 cups butternut squash, chopped and steamed

4 eggs

1/3 cup applesauce

2 1/2 cups almond meal 

1 cup raisins

1 tbs almond milk

1 tsp baking powder

1 tbs cinnamon

Preheat oven to 325 F. Mix butternut squash, eggs, applesauce, and almond milk in a food processor. Spoon into a bowl and stir in almond meal, baking powder, cinnamon, and raisins. Pour into a loaf pan lined with parchment paper and sprinkle with a bit more cinnamon.

Bake for 1 hour 20 minutes or until cooked through. Let cool for an hour before cutting.

 

Buttered Prawns with Tomatoes, Olives and Arak

Recipe from Ottolenghi by Yotam Ottolenghi

6 to 8 San Marzano Tomatoes

3 to 4 softened unsalted Butter

1/2 tsp dried Chili Flakes

2 oz Kalamata Olives, pitted

1 1/2 TB Arak or Pernod

3 Garlic cloves, very thinly sliced

2 TB chopped Flat-leaf Parsley

Coarse Sea Salt

Start by preparing the tomatoes. Make a tiny shallow cross with a sharp knife at the bottom of each one and put them in boiling water for 30 seconds.  Remove, refresh under plenty of cold water, then drain.  Now peel the skin away and cut each tomato into 4 to 6 wedges.  Set aside.  To prepare the prawns, peel the shells away form the bodies, keeping the tail segment of the shell on. Cut a shallow slit along the back of each prawn and remove the dark vein using the tip of a small knife. 

Place a frying pan over a high heat.  When very hot, add 2 TB of butter and salute the prawns quickly for 2 minutes, shaking the pan as you go.  Add the tomatoes, chili and olive and cook for another 2 to 3 minutes, until the prawns are nearly cooked through.  Add the Arak carefully (it tends to catch fire!). Let the alcohol evaporate for a minute before quickly adding the remaining butter plus the garlic, parsley and some salt. Toss for a second for everything to come together in a runny sauce, then serve immediately, with bread.

Danielle’s Sweet Potato Gratin

Recipe from Ottolenghi by Yotam Ottolenghi

About 3 lbs. Sweet Potatoes

5TB roughly chopped Sage, plus extra to garnish

6 Garlic cloves, crushed

2 tsp coarse Sea Salt

1/2 tsp freshly ground Black Pepper

1 cup Whipping Cream

Preheat the oven to 400 F.  Wash the sweet potatoes, but do not peel them, cut them into discs about 1/4” thick.  They need to be very thin in order to cook well through. A mandolin works best. In a bowl, mix together the sweet potatoes, sage, garlic, salt and pepper. Arrange the slices of sweet potato in a deep, medium-sized ovenproof dish by taking tight packs of them and standing them up next to each other.  They should fit together quite tightly so you get parallel lines of sweet potato slices (skins showing) along the length or width of the dish.  

Throw any remaining bits of garlic or sage from the bowl over the potatoes. Cover the dish with foil, place in the oven and roast for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and pour the cream evenly over the potatoes. Roast, uncovered, for a further 25 minutes. The cream should have thickened by now.  

Stick a sharp knife in different places in the dish to make sure the potatoes are cooked. They should be totally soft.  Serve immediately, garnished with sage, or leave to cool down. In any case, bringing the potatoes to the table in the baking dish, after scraping the outside clean, will make a strong impact.  This dish would go well sauteed or stir fried greens like the stir fry mix, or chard, or even bok choy.

 

Citrus

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Walking through the orchard this morning I was really happy to see most of our citrus trees are quite heavy with fruit. Let’s keep our fingers crossed we don’t have any serious frost this year, and we get to enjoy all of these beauties! One of the things I find most fascinating with citrus is how long the fruit is on the tree. Doing a little reading on the Plant Scientist blog, I learned that oranges are actually hybrids of the Pomelo and Tangerine. Only in more temperate climates will the skin turn orange, in the tropics they stay green. 

The cooler temperatures and lack of sun reduces the amount of chlorophyl; more sun in the tropics = more chlorophyl = ripe oranges that stay green.  Interestingly though the Blood Orange, which is a Mediterranean fruit, gets its darker colored flesh from anthocyanins. Anthocyanins are strong anti-oxidants, it creates the blue color in blueberries, and the dark color on our artisan cherry tomatoes.  The Blood Orange does well in a Mediterranean climate and since that is what we have here, perhaps we should look into planting a row.  So much to look forward to! 

 

Winter Is Coming

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Now that I have been sucked into Game of Thrones, that statement has more meanings than just the one. On our farm walk this morning, I couldn’t help but say it at least 10 times. Poor Cameron! Every where you look it is obvious that Winter is Coming. Small cabbage, cauliflower, broccoli, Romanesco plants looking quite perky.  The chard recently jumped in size in a serious way. All promising good food for the months to come. We are so lucky to live in a place in the world where our climate allows us to grow year round; our soil is rich and fertile, giving and giving.  But with all the excitement of the meals to come during the darker, colder months, I am also saddened to see the tractor out mowing tomatoes.  At this time of year I start to feel a bit desperate about getting enough sauce made. I try to make some sauce every week with the tomatoes that come back from the market, but seeing the mower going this morning I know the end of is in sight!

Flame Weeder

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This is a rather frightening piece of equipment; it literally shoots a flame out of the end.  Nigel bought it several years ago, but none of our guys likes to use it, so it sits.  It has been parked in this spot for a few years now, standing as a reminder of good ideas that don’t pan out.  Nigel was never afraid of making mistakes, he was more afraid of standing still.  Forward motion was always his preferred mode in life.  I often feel compelled to just do something, even though I really don’t know what I am doing.  You see he trained me well, but I have to remember I don’t have the encyclopedic amounts of information in my head like he did, so rapid decisions from me aren’t always the best choice.  The flame weeder sits there reminding me that Nigel made mistakes too and the farm has more than survived, so I guess it will be OK when I make them too.

This Week's Box: October 2nd- October 8th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

*Bok Choy - This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in the fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

*Peppers- Only wash them right before you plan on eating them as moisture decreases storage time. Store in a cool room to use in a couple of days, place in the crisper if longer storage is needed. Lasts up to one week. 

*Tomatoes - Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness, place in a paper bag with an apple.

*Plums- Store ripe plums in the refrigerator. This will keep them in top shape and prevent fast deterioration. Place them in an open plastic bag - not a sealed one. Plums stored in the refrigerator will last two to four weeks.

Squash- Store in a cool, dark, well-ventilated place. Many growers say squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

*Raisins- Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

Sweet Potatoes- Store in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate ‐ sweet potatoes don't like the cold. Lasts up to 3 weeks if stored properly. 

*Garlic- Store whole in a cool dry place around 55-60 degrees. Can last 3-5 months.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Sauteed Bok Choy with Creamy Miso Dressing

 

Butternut Bisque

Sweet Potatoes With Yogurt and Cilantro-Chile Sauce

Sauteed Gypsy Peppers

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE BASIC SALT AND PEPPER):

Shopping list for Sauteed Bok Choy with Creamy Miso Dressing

 

1 TB Red Miso, if you like it stronger, add more

1/4 cup Tahini

1/4 cup Yogurt

2 tsp Honey

1 TB Olive Oil

Juice and zest from 1/2 Lemon

Shopping list for Butternut Bisque

 

3 TB Butter

1 medium Onion, coarsely chopped

1/2 tsp dried Thyme

1/4 tsp ground Cinnamon

1/8 to 1/4 tsp Cayenne Pepper, plus more for garnish (optional)

Coarse Salt

14 1/2 oz Chicken Broth or Vegetable Broth

1 cup Half and Half

1 TB fresh Lemon Juice

Sour Cream, for serving

Shopping list for Sweet Potatoes With Yogurt and Cilantro-Chile Sauce

1/4 cup plus 1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil, plus more for serving

1/2 TB Honey

Juice of 2 Limes

1/2 bunch Cilantro, leaves only (1/2 oz)

2 Green Chiles, seeded and chopped

2 TB sliced blanched Almonds

1 TB White Wine Vinegar

1 cup Greek Yogurt

Shopping list for Sauteed Gypsy Peppers

2 TB Olive Oil

1 small Red Onion, quartered and thinly sliced

1 1/2 TB chopped Marjoram, Anise Hyssop or Basil

1 TB Balsamic Vinegar

Shopping list for all recipes:

1 TB Red Miso, if you like it stronger, add more

1/4 cup Tahini

1/2 TB plus 2 tsp Honey

1 cup plus 4 TB Olive Oil

3 TB Butter

1/2 tsp dried Thyme

1/4 tsp ground Cinnamon

1/8 to 1/4 tsp Cayenne Pepper, plus more for garnish (optional)

14 1/2 oz Chicken Broth or Vegetable Broth

1 cup Half and Half

1  1/2 Lemon 

Sour Cream, for serving

1/2 bunch Cilantro, leaves only (1/2 oz)

2 Green Chiles, seeded and chopped

2 TB sliced blanched Almonds

1 TB White Wine Vinegar

1 1/2 cups Greek Yogurt

2 Red Onions

1 1/2 TB chopped Marjoram, Anise Hyssop or Basil

1 TB Balsamic Vinegar

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Sauteed Bok Choy with Creamy Miso Dressing

By Eatwell’s Farmhouse Kitchen

This is really a very simple dish. You can serve the Bok Choy hot or cold, with the Miso dressing drizzled over the top. If you look online you will find many recipes for Tahini Miso dressing, but I like to add Greek Yogurt to mine. I also prefer the flavor of the stronger Red Miso for this dressing.

1 TB Red Miso, if you like it stronger, add more

1/4 cup Tahini

1/4 cup Yogurt

2 tsp Honey

1 TB Olive Oil

Juice and zest from 1/2 Lemon

Salt and Pepper, to taste

Mix all the ingredients in a bowl with a fork to smooth out the miso.

Sautee the Bok Choy in a hot pan with a splash of Olive Oil and a tiny bit of Toasted Sesame Oil. When it is nearly done, splash on a bit of Soy Sauce or Tamari.

Sweet Potatoes With Yogurt and Cilantro-Chile Sauce

Recipe by Melissa Clark NYT shared on our CSA Slack group by CSA member Kate K

1/4 cup plus 1/3 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil, plus more for serving

1/2 TB Honey

Juice of 2 Limes

Kosher Salt, to taste

Black Pepper, to taste

2 1/4 lbs Sweet Potatoes, scrubbed and cut into 1” wedges

1/2 bunch Cilantro, leaves only (1/2 oz)

2 Green Chiles, seeded and chopped

2 cloves Garlic, grated on a Microplane or minced

2 TB sliced blanched Almonds

1 TB White Wine Vinegar

1 cup Greek Yogurt

Heat the oven to 350 F.  IN a large bowl, combine 1/4 cup oil, the honey, juice form 1 lime, a large pinch of salt and pepper to taste, and toss with potato wedges.  Spread in an even layer on a rimmed baking sheet, bake until tender and lightly browned in spots, 45 to 55 minutes. Sprinkle with additional salt to taste.  Meanwhile, in a food processor, pulse to combine 1/3 cup oil, the cilantro, chiles, garlic, almonds, juice from remaining lime, vinegar and a large pinch of salt, until it forms a chunky puree.  Taste and add more salt if needed. Spoon the sauce over the potatoes, dollop with some yogurt, drizzle with oil, and serve with any remaining yogurt on the side.

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