Pumpkins

unnamed.jpg

The orange balls of color out in the field are one of the best signifiers that Fall is here.  Here in Northern California we don’t have much going on that screams the season has changed, so for us the pumpkin patch is kind of it.  These are sugar pie pumpkins, which means they are good for exactly that Pie.  I really enjoy reading the history or foods, and learning where they come from.  Here is a short bit on pumpkins from the University of Arizona:

Pumpkins are believed to have originated in Central America. Seeds from related plants have been found in Mexico, dating back over 7000 years to 5500 B.C. Native Americans used pumpkins as a staple in their diets for centuries. They called the pumpkin “isqoutm Squash.” Native Americans used pumpkin seeds for food and medicine. They also flattened strips of pumpkin, dried them and made mats. Early settlers ate pumpkin as a staple in their diet. Colonist filled a hollowed out shell with milk, honey, and spices, then baked it in hot ashes. This is considered the origin of the pumpkin pie. 

The Beauty of Starts

trays.jpg

There really is something so beautiful in trays of starts.  In this picture you see lettuce at the bottom and cabbages above.  The colors are so vibrant, and each little cell in the tray is a promise of great meals to come.  Before we get to the point of receiving these trays though, Cameron has already put hours of work in.  The first step is determining when we want to harvest a crop.  From there he works backwards, factoring in the days to germination, to days of maturity.  How many weeks do we want a particular crop?  Can we harvest before it is at full maturity?  Lettuce and many of the greens we can pick young, putting together bags of Stir Fry Mix or mixed baby lettuce. 

tractor.jpg

Once Headstart sends us the trays of starts, the guys get them into the ground.  Several years back Nigel invested in this Italian transplanter, which seats up to 3 guys.  While the tractor slowly makes its way down the rows they gently take the little starts from the tray and pop them down the planting tubes.  Before this machine, we used a transplanting sled.  The guys would lie flat and work off of a wooden platform, not very comfortable and it was much slower.   

This Week's Box October 16th-20th, 2018

IMG_2471.jpg


CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

1. IN THE BOX:

*Items in Box for 2

San Marzano Tomatoes- Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter.

OR

Heirloom Tomatoes- Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter.

Turnips- Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an
open container with a moist cloth.

OR

Radishes- Remove the greens (store separately) so they don't draw out excess moisture from the roots. Place them in an open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top. Lasts up to one week

Chard- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Cherry Tomatoes- Do not refrigerate until they are fully ripe. Allow them to ripen at room temperature. This will result in more flavorful, juicy tomatoes. Once fully ripe, place in a plastic bag and refrigerate. Will keep several days once ripe.*Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

*Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

*Sweet Potatoes- Store in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate ‐ sweet potatoes don't like the cold. Lasts up to 3 weeks if stored properly.

*Eggplant- Does fine left out in a cool room. Don't wash it, eggplant doesn't like any extra moisture around its leaves. For longer storage - place loose, in the crisper. Keeps 5-7 days.

*Basil- Trim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week

*Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water. 

*Stir Fry Mix- These baby mixed greens can be stored by lining a storage container with paper towels, place the mixed greens on top, and cover with another layer of paper towels and lock the lid. Make sure there is plenty of space and the greens are not jam-packed in there. Will last up to one week.

*Apples- Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months. 

Raisins- Store in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Fennel, Cherry Tomato & Crumble Gratin

Roasted Ratatouille Pasta

Sweet Potato Pancakes

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Fennel, Cherry Tomato & Crumble Gratin

3 TB Olive Oil

1 TB Thyme leaves, plus a few whole sprigs

3 Garlic Cloves, crushed

2/3 to 1 cup Whipping Cream

3 to 4 oz Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

1 tsp chopped Parsley
Roasted Ratatouille Pasta

12 oz Zucchini, cut into 1” pieces

2 Red Bell Peppers, seeded and coarsely chopped

1 Shallot, thinly sliced

4 cloves Garlic, minced

1/4 to 1/2 cups Olive Oil

2 to 4 TB Balsamic Vinegar

2 tsp chopped fresh Thyme (OR use Eatwell Thyme salt instead)

8 oz Penne or Gemelli Pasta

Sweet Potato Pancakes

1 cup Flour

2 tsp Baking Powder

1/2 tsp ground Cinnamon

1/4 tsp ground Nutmeg

1 large Egg

1 1/4 cups Milk

1 TB Brown Sugar

1 TB Vegetable Oil

Fennel, Cherry Tomato & Crumble Gratin

I have wanted to use this recipe since I got this book 6 years ago, but we never have Fennel and Cherry Tomatoes at the same time.  

2 lb Fennel Bulbs

3 TB Olive Oil

1 TB Thyme leaves, plus a few whole sprigs

3 Garlic Cloves, crushed

1 TB Coarse Sea Salt

1 tsp Black Pepper

2/3 to 1 cup Whipping Cream

1/3 quantity of Crumble 

(recipe follows)

3 to 4 oz Parmesan cheese, freshly grated

1 Basket Cherry Tomatoes

1 tsp chopped Parsley

Preheat oven to 400 F.  Trim off the fennel stalks and cut each bulb lengthways in half.  Cut each half into slices about 1/2” thick.  Place in a large bowl with the olive oil, thyme leaves, garlic, salt and pepper and toss together.  Transfer to an ovenproof dish and pour the cream over the fennel.  Mix the crumble with the grated Parmesan and scatter evenly on top.  Cover the dish with foil and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the foil and arrange the tomatoes on top.  Scatter a few thyme sprigs on top.  Return to the oven and bake for another 15 minutes.  By now the fennel should feel soft when poked with a knife and the gratin should have a nice golden color.  Remove from the oven and allow to rest for a few minutes.  Sprinkle chopped parsley over and serve hot or warm.

For the Crumble:

10 oz Flour

3 oz Sugar

7 oz cold Unsalted Butter, cut into small cubes

Put the flour, sugar and butter in a bowl and mix with your hands or an electric mixer fitted with the beater attachment to work it to a uniform breadcrumb consistency.  Make sure there are no lumps of butter left.  If using a mixer, watch it carefully.  Within a few seconds, a crumble can turn into a cookie dough. Transfer the crumble to a plastic container.  It will keep in the fridge for up to 5 days or for ages in the freezer.


Roasted Ratatouille Pasta

This recipe was shared by CSA member Rose on our Eatweller’s Community Slack Page.  Rose makes big batches and freezes it.  She uses it on pasta, fish and chicken too!

12 oz Eggplant, chopped into 1” pieces

 1 1/4 lb Tomatoes, chopped into 1” pieces

12 oz Zucchini, cut into 1” pieces

2 Red Bell Peppers, seeded and coarsely chopped

1 Onion, chopped

1 Shallot, thinly sliced

4 cloves Garlic, minced

1/4 to 1/2 cups Olive Oil

2 to 4 TB Balsamic Vinegar

2 tsp chopped fresh Thyme (OR use Eatwell Thyme salt instead)

1 tsp Salt, plus more to taste

Freshly ground Black Pepper, to taste

1/4 to 1/2 cups thinly sliced fresh Basil and or Parsley

8 oz Penne or Gemelli Pasta

Grated Parmesan, to taste, optional

Preheat the oven to 400.  In a large roasting pan or casserole, combine the tomatoes, eggplant, zucchini, peppers, onion, shallot, and garlic.  Note:  the author adds the vegetables to the pan as she finishes chopping them, and sprinkles each layer with a little salt. In a small bowl or measuring cup, whisk together the olive oil, vinegar, thyme, and 1 tsp salt.  Pour over the vegetables.  Toss to coat.  Season with pepper.  Bake for 20 minutes, then stir well.  Bake for another 20 to 30 minutes more (or even longer) until the vegetables are all very tender and the released juices are beginning to thicken.  Taste and adjust seasoning with more salt and pepper as desired. Stir in basil.  Bring a large pot of water to a boil.  Season with a TB of salt.  Cook pasta al dente.  Drain, reserving some of the pasta cooking liquid.  Transfer pasta to a large bow. Add ratatouille to taste.  Toss. Taste. Add parmesan if desired. Serve with more pepper as needed.

Sweet Potato Pancakes

Recipe Cathrine Mccord from Weelicious 

I had a half baked Sweet Potato left over last week and decided to make pancakes with it. I didn’t use a recipe, but I also didn’t measure. For accuracy I found this recipe which sounded quite similar.  I used Capay Mills Sonora Flour and used a combo of Greek Yogurt and Milk to add a little tang. 

1 cup Flour

2 tsp Baking Powder

1/2 tsp ground Cinnamon

1/4 tsp ground Nutmeg

1/2 tsp Salt

1 large Egg

1 1/4 cups Milk

1 TB Brown Sugar

1 TB Vegetable Oil

1 cup Sweet Potato Puree

In a bowl, whisk together  flour, baking powder, cinnamon, nutmeg and salt. In a separate bowl, whisk together the remaining ingredients. Gradually add the dry ingredients to the wet ingredients and stir until just combined.  Heat a large skillet or griddle over medium heat and lightly coat with butter or oil. Pour about 1 TB of the pancake mixture onto the griddle, making as many pancakes as will fit and cook for 2 minutes. Flip and cook one minute longer on other side. Serve.

Rose Geranium

IMG_0804.JPG

Over the summer Andrew took on the Rose Geranium planting project; his plants are looking great. Last week I took Rose Geranium to Wally’s in Sonoma for distillation, which gives us two products - essential oil and hydrosol. Most of you will be familiar with essential oils, but few people know what a hydrosol is, so here is the official definition from NAHA (National Association for Holistic Aromatherapy):

Hydrosols, also known as hydrolats, are the aqueous product of distillation and carry the hydrophilic properties (water-soluble components) of the plant in solution as well as microscopic droplets of essential oils in suspension.”

I use the hydrosols as the flavor ingredients in our Drinkwell Softers. We also package hydrosol in 80 ml spray bottles and sell them pure. Hydrosols are great for light burns, like a sunburn, very cooling, but they make a nice light facial toner; naturally a lower pH than straight water. Our’s are anywhere from 4.2 to 4.8 which makes them a little closer to the natural pH of skin at 5.5. Rose Geranium has a beautiful rose like scent. The plant produces very little essential oil. Last year we distilled 200 lb of rose geranium, which gave us 35 gallons of hydrosol and 2.5 oz of essential oil. By comparison the same amount of Lavender Grosso gave us close to 60 oz! And to be honest that 2.5 oz was a great EO yield for Rose Geranium. This is why we wholesale a 5ml bottle for $50.00.

You can imagine we don’t sell much of it. Our number one customer for Rose Geranium Essential Oil is the bakery Miette who uses it in their Macaroons. Did you know you can use a few leaves from the plant to scent sugar, by simply putting the leaves in a jar with sugar and letting it sit for a week? You can also scent a lot of sugar with one drop of EO, which is what Miette does.

I love to keep a few sprigs in a small vase near my bed just to have that beautiful scent near me.
You can use the hydrosol spray on your pillow, but I mostly use it as a refresher for my face and hair. Hydrosols can be diluted with water and turned into ice cubes, making your ice something really special. You can see this pretty little fragrant plant has plenty of uses.

This Week's Box October 9th-13th, 2018

 Summer meets fall in your box this week!

Summer meets fall in your box this week!


CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

1. IN THE BOX:

*Items in Box for 2

*San Marzano Tomatoes- Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter.

OR

*Heirloom Tomatoes- Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter.

*Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.*Lunchbox peppers- Only wash them right before you plan on eating them as moisture decreases storage time. Store in a cool room to use in a couple of days, place in the crisper if longer storage is needed. Lasts up to one week.

OR

*Red Russian KaleRemove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Wash well before use.

*Turnips- Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an
open container with a moist cloth.

*Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

*ChardRemove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.

*Sweet PotatoesStore in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate ‐ sweet potatoes don't like the cold. Lasts up to 3 weeks if stored properly.

*PomegranatesKeeps up to a month stored on a cool counter.

Eggplant- Does fine left out in a cool room. Don't wash it, eggplant doesn't like any extra moisture around its leaves. For longer storage - place loose, in the crisper. Keeps 5-7 days.

BasilTrim the ends and place basil in a glass containing about 1 inch of water; then cover with a loose-fitting plastic bag and leave at room temp. Replace the water whenever it gets cloudy. Should keep for about a week

FennelIf used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water. 

Spaghetti Squash- Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Many growers say winter squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

ApplesApples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months. 

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Sweet Potatoes & Greens

Turnips with Yogurt & Tomatoes

Chicken Cutlets with Chard & Pomegranate

Spaghetti Squash Fritter

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Sweet Potatoes & Greens

1 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 Avocado, sliced and divided

Cayenne
Lemon
Turnips with Yogurt & Tomatoes

1 1/2 cups plain Yogurt
3 TB good cooking Oil
2 Shallots, peeled and thinly sliced (or use 1/2 onion from the share)
1/2 tsp Cumin Seeds
1/4 tsp Cayenne

Chicken Cutlets with Chard & Pomegranate

1/2 cup All-Purpose Flour
4 Chicken Breasts boneless, skinless, pounded to 1/4” thick, aprox 6 oz each

2 large Eggs
1 1/2 cups Panko Breadcrumbs
1/4 cup Olive Oil + 2TB
1 Red Onion, thinly sliced
2 cloves Garlic, thinly sliced
1/2 tsp Chile Flakes

Spaghetti Squash Fritter

1/3 cup Arrowroot Starch or Flour
1 Green Onion, sliced

4 slices Bacon, cooked and crumbled
3 large Eggs
1 to 2 TB Coconut Oil or cooking fat of choice

Spaghetti Squash Fritter

Recipe from Julie & Charles Mayfield Weeknight Paleo

This recipe was shared on the Eatweller’s Slack page by CSA member Louise. She is not the biggest fan of spaghetti squash, but really loved this recipe.

3 cups cooked Spaghetti Squash, strands separated 1/3 cup Arrowroot Starch or Flour
1/2 tsp Salt
1 Green Onion, sliced

4 slices Bacon, cooked and crumbled
3 large Eggs
1 to 2 TB Coconut Oil or cooking fat of choice

Place the squash in a large bowl. If it’s too moist, wrap it in some paper towels and squeeze out the excess liquid. Add the arrowroot or flour, salt, green onion, and bacon and stir to combine well. Whisk the eggs in a small bowl, then add them to the squash mixture and stir to combine. Heat a large skillet over medium heat. Add enough oil to coat the pan, and when it’s hot, spoon the squash mixture to form fritters of your desired size; 1/4 cup per fritter works well. When the fritter are crispy and browned on one side, about 5 minutes, use a spatula to flip them and continue cooking on the other side until crisped, about 5 minutes longer. Serve hot

Chicken Cutlets with Chard & Pomegranate

Recipe by Michael Symon from ABC.com

I looked at the picture of this dish, with the chard and pomegranate mixture served right on top of the cutlets and it was mouthwatering! As a good German girl I do love a good cutlet:)

1/2 cup All-Purpose Flour
4 Chicken Breasts boneless, skinless, pounded to 1/4” thick, aprox 6 oz each 2 large Eggs
1 1/2 cups Panko Breadcrumbs
1/4 cup Olive Oil + @ TB
1 Red Onion, thinly sliced
2 cloves Garlic, thinly sliced
1/2 tsp Chile Flakes
8 cups Chard, sliced to 1/4” thick
1/3 cup Pomegranate Seeds
Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

Place large saute pan over medium- high heat. Season chicken with salt and pepper. In three separate baking dishes, add flour, eggs and breadcrumbs. Season flour dish with salt and pepper. Dredge chicken in flour, then dip in egg and finally in breadcrumbs, shaking off excess. To the preheated pan, add 1/4 cup oil. Add chicken and cook until golden brown and crispy, about 3 minutes. Flip and continue to cook another 1-2 minutes. Remove to a paper towel-lined sheet tray. Place another large sauce pan over medium-high heat and add 2 TB olive oil. Add the onion and sauce for 2-3 minutes. Add the garlic and chili flakes and sauce for one more minute. Add the chard, season with salt and cook, stirring occasionally for 2-3 minutes, until the chard begins to wilt. Add the pomegranate seeds and mix to combine. Serve with the chicken.

Turnips with Yogurt & Tomatoes

This recipe is really intriguing, using yogurt marinated turnips, combined with some tomato. Looking forward to giving this one a try.

1 1/2 cups plain Yogurt
Salt
6 medium Turnips, trimmed, peeled and cut into 1/2” cubes
3 TB good cooking Oil
2 Shallots, peeled and thinly sliced (or use 1/2 onion from the share0
1/2 tsp Cumin Seeds
2 Tomatoes, peeled, cored and chopped
1/4 tsp Cayenne


Put yogurt and 1 tsp salt into a large glass or ceramic bowl and mix together with a wooden spoon until smooth. Add turnips and stir until well coated. Cover with plastic wrap and marinate in the refrigerator for at least 3 hours or overnight. Drain turnips and yogurt in a stranger set over a medium bowl, gently stirring until most of the yogurt has drained into the bowl below. Transfer turnips to another medium bowl. Set turnips and yogurt aside separately. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet over medium-high heat. Add shallots (or onion) and cook, stirring frequently with a wooden spoon, until softened, 1-2 minutes. Add cumin seeds and turnips and cook, stirring often, until shallots and turnips begin to brown, about 10 minutes. Add tomatoes, reserved yogurt and cayenne and cook, stirring occasionally, until turnips are soft when pierced with knife and sauce has thickened, about 10 minutes more. Season to taste with salt.

Sweet Potatoes & Greens

Recipe from Martha Stewart

I love the flavor combination of the sweet/earthy Sweet Potato alongside the slight bitter of greens. I would add a good knob of butter to my sweet potatoes and maybe even a dollop of greek yogurt.

2 pricked Sweet Potatoes
1 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil
1 Small Onion, thinly sliced
1 bunch Kale or Arugula, stemmed Coarse Salt
1 Avocado, sliced and divided Cayenne
Lemon

Heat oven to 400 F. Bake sweet potatoes until tender, about 45 minutes. Heat oil in a large skillet over medium heat. Add onions and cook until tender, about 6 minutes. Add chard or arugula and cook stirring, until bright green and wilted. Season with salt. To serve, split potatoes and top each with green and 1/2 sliced avocado. Season with cayenne, salt, and lemon.

This Week's Box October 2nd-6th, 2018

IMG_2445.jpg

CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

*Grapes- Store, unwashed, in your refrigerator's fruit drawer. They last up to a week. 

OR

*RaisinsStore in a cool, dry place out of direct sunlight. Refrigeration is recommended in hot environments. Should last several weeks.

*Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.*Lunchbox peppers- Only wash them right before you plan on eating them as moisture decreases storage time. Store in a cool room to use in a couple of days, place in the crisper if longer storage is needed. Lasts up to one week.

Heirloom Tomatoes- Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness, place in a paper bag with an apple.

OR

Eggplant- Does fine left out in a cool room. Don't wash it, eggplant doesn't like any extra moisture around its leaves. For longer storage - place loose, in the crisper. Keeps 5-7 days.

*ChardRemove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Keeps 2-3 days.*CucumberCucumbers can be wrapped in a moist towel in the fridge. If you’re planning on eating them within a day or two after buying them they should be fine left out in a cool room. Lasts up to a week in the fridge.

*San Marzano Tomatoes- Depending on ripeness, tomatoes can stay for up to two weeks on the counter. To hasten ripeness, place in a paper bag with an apple.

Cherry Tomatoes- Do not refrigerate until they are fully ripe. Allow them to ripen at room temperature. This will result in more flavorful, juicy tomatoes. Once fully ripe, place in a plastic bag and refrigerate. Will keep several days once ripe.*Onions- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

*PotatoesStore in a cool, dry, dark place. Should keep for a week or more easily. If you want to store them for longer, say 2 or 3 months, keep them between 45-55 degrees, again in a dry place out of the light.

Sweet PotatoesStore in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate ‐ sweet potatoes don't like the cold. Lasts up to 3 weeks if stored properly.

*Radishes- Remove the greens (store separately) so they don't draw out excess moisture from the roots. Place them in an open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top. Lasts up to one week. 

RosemaryTo keep green: wrap in a damp paper towel and store in a plastic bag in the fridge. Lasts one week or more. To dry, leave bound around the stems and hang - last 2 weeks to a month.

*Onion- Store in a cool dry place out of the light. Lasts 2-3 months.

PomegranateKeeps up to a month stored on a cool counter.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Gnocchi with Fresh Tomato Sauce

Wilted Arugula

Chard with Bacon and Apples

Salted Rosemary Roasted Radishes

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Gnocchi with Fresh Tomato Sauce

1 Egg Yolk

2 oz All Purpose Flour, plus extra for dustin

Freshly grated Nutmeg

Wilted Arugula

1 TB Balsamic Vinegar

Chard with Bacon and Apples

3 slices bacon, diced

Salted Rosemary Roasted Radishes

1 tablespoon Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 tsp minced fresh Rosemary

1 TB Honey (optional)

Dipping Sauce

1/4 cup plain Greek Yogurt

1 tsp Dijon Mustard

1 TB Honey Mustard

1 tsp Lemon Juice

Salted Rosemary Roasted Radishes

Recipe from Running To The Kitchen

2 cups Radishes, cleaned and trimmed, larger ones halved

1 tablespoon Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 generous pinch of Salt

Pinch of Black Pepper

1 tsp minced fresh Rosemary

1 TB Honey (optional)

Dipping Sauce

1/4 cup plain Greek Yogurt

1 tsp Dijon Mustard

1 TB Honey Mustard

1 tsp Lemon Juice

Preheat oven to 425 degrees. Grease a baking sheet with cooking spray. Toss radishes with olive oil, salt, pepper and rosemary in a medium bowl to coat. Spread the radishes on the baking sheet in an even single layer. Roast for 30-40 minutes, stirring occasionally so they cook evenly and don't burn. Remove from oven when wrinkled and soft. Drizzle with optional honey and more salt directly out of oven, serve warm. For the sauce, combine all ingredients in a small bowl and stir together until mixed.

Chard with Bacon and Apples

Recipe From Whole Foods Market

3 slices bacon, diced

1 Yellow Onion, halved and thinly sliced

1 Apple, cored and diced

1 bunch Chard, rinsed well

1/4 tsp fine Sea Salt

1/4 tsp freshly ground Black Pepper

Place a large, heavy skillet over medium heat.  Add bacon and cook, stirring frequently, until lightly browned, about 7 minutes.  Remove bacon from pan with slotted spoon and set aside.  Add onion to the pan and cook until softened, about 5 minutes.  Stir in apples.  Meanwhile, cut off the stems of the chard and slice them thinly.  Chop the leaves.  Stir stems and leaves into the skillet along with the bacon salt and pepper.  Pour in 2 TB water; cover the skillet and cook, stirring frequently, until chard is tender, about 8 minutes more

Search