Jerusalem Artichoke and Leek Soup

Recipe by Michael Aviad found on A Sweet Life

2 lb Jerusalem artichoke, peeled and sliced

3 medium Leeks, white and light green parts only, washed well and sliced

2 Garlic cloves, minced

1 Celery stalk, chopped

1/4 cup Thyme leaves

1/2 cup Olive Oil

1 cup Cream

Salt & Pepper to taste

Heat the oil in a large pot over a high flame. Add the onion, celery and leek and cook for 7 minutes while stirring.  Add the Jerusalem artichoke, thyme and garlic and cook for another 7 minutes, and stir.

Add 8 cups of water, bring to a boil, then lower flame and let it cook for 30 minutes.  Make sure the Jerusalem artichoke is soft and remove from heat.  Puree the contents of the pot using a hard blender until smooth, add salt and pepper, and return to the stove.  Bring the soup to a boil, lower the flame and allow it to cook for 15 minutes.  Stir in the cream, salt and pepper and continue cooking for several minutes without letting the soup boil.  Serve hot.

Date, Feta and Red Cabbage Salad

photo credit: SmittenKitchen.com

photo credit: SmittenKitchen.com

Recipe from Smitten Kitchen

If you have been ordering any of the mixed date boxes we have been offering as an extra, here is a great use for them.

1 to 1 1/4 lb Red Cabbage, sliced very thin

3 TB Olive Oil

2 TB Lime or Lemon Juice

Salt and Red Pepper Flakes, to taste

1/2 cup pitted Dates, coarsely chopped

4 oz Feta, crumbled 

1 TB chopped flat-leaf Parsley

2 tsp well toasted Sesame Seeds

Toss cabbage with olive oil and first TB of lime or lemon juice, salt and pepper, coating leaves evenly.  Taste and add more lime/lemon juice, salt and pepper to taste.  I do this a few times making sure I really get this base well seasoned because it will be hard to it as well later.  Toss dressed cabbage gently with half of dates and feta.  Sprinkle with remaining dates, then feta, then parsley and sesame seeds.  Serve. 

Chicks, Chickens and Chicken Stock…..

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The circle of life for the chickens on the farm.  The day after Thanksgiving, Agustin and Miguel were busy finishing up the final steps to prep the chick house.  Babies were hatching at 9 am, yes that is the time that was scheduled, and due to arrive between 10:30 and 11:00 that morning.  The fresh bedding was spread, heat lamps turned on and watering bowls (officially called poultry drinkers) were filled.  This all happens after nearly a week’s worth of cleaning and sanitizing the house.  It’s important to make sure the babies have a clean environment in which to start their lives.   Once all that work is completed,  we’re ready for the cuteness to arrive. 


The new flock will start laying pullets in about 6 months.  Have you ever tried a pullet?  They are an egg you find in stores because in commercial production they go for powdered eggs (can I say, yuck!).  When they come around I encourage you to give them a try, they are my favorite, with a truly delicious, silky texture.  Of course we never have many of them, so when you see available as an extra, I would jump on them!


Once fully matured our girls are great layers for close to 2 years.  As they age the eggs get bigger, and bigger.  During the later spring and early summer months our flock is laying close to 120 dozen a day, but then drop to the low point, which is where we are right now, to the mid 50’s.  At our current low egg production the cost of feed and labor is solidly at $8.00 per dozen.  This swing in production is really challenging to make the numbers, cost/income balance, because when our production is high so is everyone else’s, and the pastured egg market is flooded. It is hard selling all those eggs, but I am grateful for you members who take advantage of our specials and order extra, and  I am  grateful for Nopa, who during those months, purchases 12 cases a week! 


As chickens age, not only does the size of the egg go up, but the amount laid each week, goes way down.  At that point it is no longer economical to keep them and off to the soup pot they go.  Our friend Tomas, the owner of Rolli Rotti, is now the king of stock; you find his bone broths in stores all over the Bay Area.  They take our spent hens and turn them into stock for us.  I would have liked to have processed birds a couple of months ago, but Tomas is so busy, especially just before the holidays, that he had no time to slot us in.  I spoke with him Saturday and we will get birds to him the weekend of the 15th and will have stock a few days later.  I know many people were disappointed to not have stock for Thanksgiving, I know I was.  AND with colder, wetter weather, I am seriously missing it.  I keep wanting to make a quick soup and realize I have no chicken stock in the freezer and it stops me in my tracks.  The crazy thing is, I am 56 years old, how in the world did I make soup all those years before we started making our stock?  Simple things, like a great chicken stock,  can dramatically change your cooking life, in a very good way.  


Chickens are an integral part of all that happens here on the farm.  Not only do they produce eggs and broth, but they are the center of our fertility program.  As the chickens move from place to place they eat down the pasture, and the bugs, scratch up the soil and leave behind fertility.  It becomes challenging in the wet months to move the houses, because the ground needs to be dry enough.  For everyone’s sake, we always appreciate a good rain, followed by several days of sun and a little breeze to dry things up.  


I’d like to finish up this long article about our chickens with a brief explanation of the different descriptions used on egg cartons, cage-free, free-range and pastured.  Cage-free is just that, chickens live in houses, and are not confined to cages.  They have no access, at all, to the out doors.  Free-Range, is a tricky one, because it sounds good, but honestly it is quite misleading.  Here is what Consumer Reports says: The claim implies that the chickens ranged freely outdoors. However, producers can make the claim as long as the birds are given access to an outdoor area, but there are no requirements for the size or condition of the outdoor area, how accessible the outdoor area is to the birds, how often and for how long each day the birds have to be given access to the outdoors. Chicken and eggs labeled “free range” therefore do not necessarily come from birds that ranged freely outdoors.


Our girls are pastured.  As far as I know, there is no legal definition.  But typically a pastured bird is one that lives outside.  Some farmers lock their hens up at night for protection from raccoons, fox etc.  We don’t have those problems, only cayotes, but Daisy keeps them at bay.  Many of our girls sleep inside the houses and many love to sleep under them, we leave it up to them.  The only time we lock them in at night is when we plan on moving the houses the following morning.  Whether they are locked in at night or not, there is great benefit to having your birds outside all day, mostly it keeps them much happier.  With lower stress levels there is a lot less fighting.  Fresh air and fresh ground reduces the chances of disease.  Do we feed them less?  No!  Those girls move a lot and have big appetites.  Their poor caged sisters expend very little energy.  And just so we are all aware, the vast majority of eggs produced in this country come from caged birds, in 2016 that figure was 90%.  Those birds live in cages about 8” wide.  


So now you have a full life cycle lesson on your Eatwell Hens.  I think it is important for us to understand why things cost what they cost, and how your food is grown.  Great care goes into your Eatwell Eggs.  But as I hear from customers all the time, they are simply the best!

Fried Broccoli and Kale with Garlic, Cumin and Lime

Recipe from Simple by Yotam Ottolenghi

1 head Broccoli, cut into 1 1/2” florets, about 3 cups

12 oz Red Russian Kale,  tough stems discarded and leaves torn into pieces

3 TB Olive Oil

3 Garlic Cloves, thinly sliced

1/2 tsp Cumin Seeds

2 tsp Urfa Chile Flake or 1 tsp other crushed Red Pepper Flakes

Salt

1/2 cup Mint Leaves, roughly shredded

1 TB Lime Juice

Place a large sauce pan filled with plenty of salted water over high heat.  Once boiling, add the broccoli and blanch for 90 seconds.  Use a slotted spoon to remove the broccoli, then refresh under plenty of cold water and dry well.  Keep the water at a boil and add the kale.  Blanch for 30 seconds, then drain and refresh.  Squeeze out as much water from the kale as you can with a clean kitchen towel and set aside.  Put the oil into a large sauce pan and place over high heat.  Add the garlic and cumin and fry for about 2 minutes, stirring a few times, until the garlic is a right golden brown.  Use a slotted spoon to remove the garlic and set aside.  Add the kale to the oil, take care, it might spatter at the beginning, and fry for 3 to 4 minutes, until the leaves are starting to crisp.  Add the broccoli, 1 tsp Chile flakes and 1/4 tsp of salt.  Stir through for a minute, then transfer to a large plate or dish.  Gently mix in the mint and drizzle with the lime juice.  Serve wit the remaining 1 tsp Chile flakes and the crisp garlic sprinkled on top.

Shrimp Bok Choy and Turmeric Soup

Recipe From Bon Appetit’s website

1 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 large Onion, chopped

6 Garlic cloves, minced

1 1/2 tsp Salt, plus additional for serving

1 tsp ground Black Pepper, plus additional for serving

1 tsp Turmeric

6 cups Chicken Broth

2 Carrots, sliced

1 lb Shitake Mushrooms, stems removed and sliced

Box Choy bunch, bottoms chopped off

1 lb Shrimp

Heat the oil in a stock pot or dutch oven over medium heat.  Add onions and garlic then sauce for 5 minutes or until translucent.  Add in salt, pepper, turmeric, chicken broth, carrots and mushrooms then bring to a boil.  Reduce heat and then let simmer, covered for 20 minutes.  Add bok choy and shrimp in the last 5 minutes of cooking.  Add salt and pepper to taste, then serve.  Frozen shrimp will dilute the soup a little bit.  You may need to add a little more salt and pepper.  

Daikon Salad with Japanese Plum Dressing

Recipe from Just One cookbook.com

This one is for all of our CSA members who love Japanese food, you know who you are!  Do not be daunted by Daikon, yes it is not a common veg for most of us, but it is really delicious and good for you.  It is actually in the cruciferous family, originating in the Mediterranean.  High in vitamin C, phosphorous, digestive enzymes and loads of good fiber.  I found a nice write up on this webpage, if you are interested here is the link: https://www.umami-insider.com/health-benefits-daikon-radish/. This recipe uses Mizuna, but you could switch that out with the arugula and or radicchio in this weeks share.

3” Daikon

3 bunches Mizuna 

3 Shiso Leaves, optional

2 TB Katusobushi (dried bonito flakes) for garnish, optional

2 TB Ikura (salmon roe) for garnish, optional

Japanese Plum Dressing

1 Umeboshi  - Japanese Pickle Plum, you can find this in most health orientated stores

3 TB Ponzu

1 TB Sesame Oil

1 TB Rice Vinegar

1/2 TB Soy Sauce

1/8tsp Sugar

Shred daikon to thread pieces (you can use a mandoline for this).  Soak shredded daikon in cold water for 5-10 minutes to get crunchy texture and get rid of bitter flavor.  Cut mizuna/arugula into 3” pieces.  Chiffonade shiso leaves (roll up tightly, then slice thinly). Combine all salad ingredients in a bowl and toss together.  Remove the seed from umeboshi and chop into small pieces.  Combine dressing ingredients in a small bowl and whisk together.  Serve chilled. Sprinkle katusobushi and inure if you like.  Pour on dressing when ready to serve.

Vegetarian Dumplings with Ginger and Cabbage

Recipe from:  www.seasonedvegetable.com/ginger-cabbage-dumpling/

For the filling:

1/2 head cabbage

3 carrots

1 small onion (or use a leek instead!)

3 cloves garlic

1 inch piece of peeled ginger (see note)

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon ground white pepper

2 tablespoons peanut oil

1 tablespoon tamari or soy sauce

1 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar

1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil

For assembling and cooking the vegetarian dumplings:

1 package round dumpling wrappers

4 tablespoons peanut oil, divided

1 cup water, divided

For the dipping sauce:

1 tablespoon your favorite chili sauce or oil

2 teaspoons Chinese black vinegar or rice wine vinegar

1 teaspoon tamari or soy sauce

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

Cook the filling:

Combine cabbage, carrot, onion(or leeks), garlic and ginger in a food processor. Sprinkle in salt and white pepper. Process until ingredients are finely chopped. Heat 2 tablespoons peanut oil over medium heat in a large nonstick pan. Add the chopped vegetables and cook until vegetables are tender and any liquid has evaporated. Pour in tamari, rice vinegar and toasted sesame oil. Stir well to combine ingredients.Remove from heat and let cool to assemble dumplings.

Assemble the dumplings:

Keep the wrappers covered with a wet paper towel and remove one wrapper at a time. It's helpful to have a little dish of water (about 1/4 cup) on the side to help seal the wrappers. Spoon 1 to 2 tablespoons of filling into the center of a wrapper. Use your finger to wet the edges of the wrapper with water. Fold wrapper in half to create a little pocket and pinch the edge of the wrappers together. Working from one side to the other, pleat the wrapper with small, accordion folds until the dumpling sealed. You can pinch the pleats together to ensure they stay closed.

Place on a parchment lined tray and cover with a wet paper towel. The parchment reduces sticking and the paper towel prevents them from drying out while you’re wrapping more dumplings. Repeat with remaining wrappers and filling.

Cook the dumplings:

Heat a nonstick pan over medium high heat. Add 2 tablespoons of peanut or sunflower oil. Place dumplings in the pan and let fry about 3 to 4 minutes. Pour a few tablespoons of water into the pan until the bottom is just covered, exact amount will depend on the size of your pan. Cover with lid and reduce heat to low. Let the dumplings steam for 4 to 5 minutes, until the water has evaporated. Remove cover, increase heat to medium, and let fry another 1 to 2 minutes until dumplings are golden and crisp. Repeat with remaining dumplings, frying in batches. Mix together dipping sauce ingredients and serve alongside dumplings

This Week's Box December 4th-8th, 2018

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1. IN THE BOX:

*Items in Box for 2

*Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

*Broccoli- Place in a breathable container or wrap in a damp towel before placing in the fridge. Lasts 1-2 weeks.

OR

*Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week. 

*Bok Choy- This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs! 

*Daikon Radish- Cut the top off the Daikon to help keep moisture in the roots, store the Daikon in a closed container in the fridge and they should last for up to two weeks if not more. A wet paper towel can also be placed in the container to help maintain humidity and keep the roots from wilting.

*Red Russian Kale- Remove any bands, twist ties, etc. Most greens must be kept in an air‐tight container with a damp cloth to keep them from drying out. Kale, collard greens, and chard do well in a cup of water on the counter or fridge. Wash well before use. 

*Leeks- These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

*Sweet Potatoes- Store in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate ‐ sweet potatoes don't like the cold. Lasts up to 3 weeks if stored properly.

*Mandarins- They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. 

Beets- Cut the tops off to keep beets firm (be sure to keep the greens!) by leaving any top on the root vegetables draws moisture from the root, making the lose flavor and firmness. Beets should be washed and kept in an open container with a wet towel on top. Keeps for several weeks.

Radicchio/Chicory- Refrigerate in a sealed plastic bag. Keeps for a week.

Apples- Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months.  

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Vegetarian Dumplings with Ginger and Cabbage

Daikon Salad With Japanese Plum Dressing

Shrimp Bok Choy and Tumeric Soup

Fried Broccoli and Kale with Garlic, Cumin, and Lime

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Vegetarian Dumplings with Ginger and Cabbage

3 carrots

1 small onion (or use a leek instead!)

3 cloves garlic

1 inch piece of peeled ginger (see note)

2 tablespoons peanut oil

1 tablespoon tamari or soy sauce

1 tablespoon unseasoned rice vinegar

1 tablespoon toasted sesame oil

1 package round dumpling wrappers

4 tablespoons peanut oil, divided

1 tablespoon your favorite chili sauce or oil

2 teaspoons Chinese black vinegar or rice wine vinegar

1 teaspoon tamari or soy sauce

1 teaspoon toasted sesame oil

Daikon Salad With Japanese Plum Dressing

3 bunches Mizuna 

3 Shiso Leaves, optional

2 TB Katusobushi (dried bonito flakes) for garnish, optional

2 TB Ikura (salmon roe) for garnish, optional

Japanese Plum Dressing

1 Umeboshi  - Japanese Pickle Plum, you can find this in most health orientated stores

3 TB Ponzu

1 TB Sesame Oil

1 TB Rice Vinegar

1/2 TB Soy Sauce

1/8tsp Sugar

Shrimp Bok Choy and Tumeric Soup

1 TB Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1 large Onion, chopped

6 Garlic cloves, minced

1 tsp Turmeric

6 cups Chicken Broth

2 Carrots, sliced

1 lb Shitake Mushrooms, stems removed and sliced

1 lb Shrimp

Fried Broccoli and Kale with Garlic, Cumin, and Lime

3 TB Olive Oil

3 Garlic Cloves, thinly sliced

1/2 tsp Cumin Seeds

2 tsp crushed Red Pepper Flakes

1/2 cup Mint Leaves, roughly shredded

1 TB Lime Juice


Care Shares and The Cooking Project

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Many of you have generously given to our Care Share program.  Years ago when Nigel came home from his first round battling cancer at UCSF, we quickly realized how important the nourishing food from the farm was for his recovery.  Because of that, Nigel and I decided to donate 10 CSA boxes, weekly, to people fighting serious illness, and asked our members if they had friends or family members who could benefit.  We asked you to help connect us with people, but very soon into it, many of you offered to donate and help support even more people.  

As the Care Share program grew we expanded it to donating boxes for seniors at the Portrero Hill Neighborhood House, and we donate to classrooms that have cooking programs.  I have personally seen how most kids will eat vegetables they would never consider touching, when it is presented to them with a connection to the farm and they play a part in cooking it.  For these kids our Care Shares make a real difference.  Today I wanted to share with you what The Cooking Project has been doing with their shares.  Thank you all for being so generous, and don’t forget, if you know someone who could benefit, please let them know about the Care Shares. If your child’s class has a cooking program, let them know they could receive a box for free.

“We at The Cooking Project have been so fortunate to partner with Eatwell Farm! We have been receiving a CSA box every week filled with organic fresh produce which we incorporate in each cooking class within our "Flavors of Asia" program series at the Oakland Asian Cultural Center. We've cooked down fresh bunches of bok choy and radishes in our noodle dish, used the plump heirloom and cherry tomatoes in our Chicken Afritada (pan-fried chicken stewed in a tomato stock), and even experimented with using fennel in our comforting bowls of Sinigang with pork (tamarind based soup) - all of which came from the fresh pickings of EatWell Farm's CSA box for the week.

Another added bonus, is that we've been able to share the produce we didn't use in our classes with our students, all eager to take home bundles of chard, sweet potatoes, mint, or baskets of tomatoes to cook with their families and apply what they have been learning.  We emphasize how it is important to know where your food comes from and how it is grown, supporting local family farms, and cooking/eating in season. We try to keep our program as accessible as possible to under-served youth, and the CSA shares from EatWell Farm help us keep costs down, as well as provide an incentive for our students to keep coming to the class.  Food is truly the gift that keeps on giving!”

Sweet Potato Fries

Recipe from Ottolenghi Simple by Yotam Ottolenghi

About 2.5 lb Sweet Potato, peeled,sliced into 1/2” thick fries

-1 TB Sweet Smoke Paprika

-1/2 tsp cayenne

-3 Garlic cloves, crushed

-3 Tb Polenta

-7 TB Olive Oil

-Flaked Sea Salt

-1 TB Sumac

Preheat oven to 450 F.  Mix the sweet potatoes in a large bowl with the paprika, cayenne, garlic, polenta, oil and 1 tsp flaked salt.  Once combines, tip the sweet potatoes and all the oil, onto two large parchment lined baking sheets and roast for 25 to 30 minutes, stirring gently once or twice, until the potatoes are cooked, crisp and golden brown.  Remove from the oven, sprinkle with the sumac and 1 tsp flaked salt, and serve at once.

Tofu Broccoli Bok Choy Stir Fry with Garlic Sesame soy Sauce and Soba Noodles

Recipe from Vegan Richa Serves 2

For the Marinade:

-7 oz tofu pressed lightly and cubes

-1 TB Maple Syrup

-3 TB Tamari or Soy Sauce

-1 TB Sesam Oil

-1/2 tsp White Pepper

-1 TB Rice Vinegar

-1/2 tsp Garlic granule or Garlic Paste

-1/2 tsp Ginger Powder

For the Stir Fry:

-8 oz Soba Noodles

-1 tsp Coconut

-4 cloves Garlic, chopped

-1 cup Broccoli, small florets and thinly sliced stems

-1 large Bok choy 

-1/4 cup Water

-1/4 tsp Pepper Flakes

-2 TB Sesame Seeds

In shallow bowl, mix all ingredients in marinade, except tofu. Add cubed tofu and let sit for at least 15 minutes to a few hours. Prepare Soba noodles according to package instructions and keep aside.  Heat oil in large skillet at medium heat.  Add garlic and cook until golden.  Add broccoli florets, broccoli stem, bok choy and 1/4 cup water.  Cover and cook 2 to 3 minutes or until bright green.  Add Tofu along with the marinade and cook for a minute.  Add the noodles, pepper flakes and mix well. Cover and cook for 2 minutes or until heated through.  Sprinkle sesame seeds and serve hot.  

Turnip Salad with Yogurt, Herbs and Poppy Seeds

Recipe from Six Seasons by Joshua McFadden

-1 bunch Turnips, with their tops saved, and  trimmed to 1/4” of green stems left

-1 Lemon, halved

-1/2 tsp dried Chile Flakes

-Salt and freshly ground Black Pepper

-1/2 cup plain Yogurt (not Greek Yogurt)

-1 cup lightly packed mixes herbs: Mint, 

Parsley, Chives, cut in 2” lengths

-4 Scallions, trimmed - including 1/2” off the green tops, sliced on a sharp angle, soaked in ice water for 20 minutes, and drained well-Extra Virgin Olive Oil

-1/4 cup Poppy Seeds

Slice turnips lengthwise as thin as you can.  If you have a mandoline, use it; otherwise make sure your knife is sharp and just go slowly.  Soak slices in ice water for 15-20 minutes, then drain well.  Rinse, dry, and rough chop the turnip greens (if they’re not in great shape, give them a quick saute in a small amount of olive oil).  Put turnips in a bowl and squeeze about half the lemon in.  Add Chile flakes, 1/2 tsp salt and many twists of black pepper and toss to blend.  Add the yogurt and toss again.  Taste and adjust the seasoning so they are quite bright.  Add the herbs, scallions, and 1/4 cup olive oil and toss again.  Taste and adjust the seasoning.  Scatter half the poppy seeds on bottom of platter or serving plates, top with turnip salad and finish with poppy seeds left.  Serve right away.  

Baked Spaghetti Squash Carbonara

Recipe from theKitchn.com 

(on Slack by member Kristina P)

Makes 10 - 1 cup serving

I love Carbonara, so I am really looking forward to giving this one a try! 

-1 medium Spaghetti Squash -about 3 lbs

-8 oz Bacon -8 to 10 slices, diced

-1 small Yellow Onion, diced OR skip the -onion and use Leeks

-4 large Eggs

-1/2 cup Ricotta Cheese

-1 1/4 cups Parmesan cheese, or mix of Parmesan and Pecorino, divided

-1 tsp Salt

-1 tsp Back Pepper

Arrange a rack in the middle of the oven and heat to 350 F.  Cut the squash in half lengthwise with a sharp chef’s knife.  Scrape out the seeds and seed flesh with a spoon and discard.  Pour 1/2 cup water into a 9x13” baking dish and place the squash cut-side down in

the water.  Roast for 45 minutes or until tender.  Cook the bacon in a heavy skillet over medium heat until the edges crips.  Add the onions and cook until soft and beginning to brown, 5 to 6 minutes.  Remove from heat.  Whisk the eggs in a large bowl, then whisk in the ricotta.  Fold in the cooked bacon and onions, then 1 cup of grated cheese and the salt and pepper.  When squash can be easily pierced with a fork, remove it from the oven and turn the heat up to 375 F.  Remove squash from the baking dish, wipe it dry, then coat it lightly with cooking spray.  Shred inside of the squash with a fork into spaghetti like strings and remove from outer shell.  It’s approximately 6 cups.  Mix squash strings into egg-and-onion mixture.  Spread in baking dish and top with remaining 1/4 cup cheese.  Bake until set and golden-brown on top, about 45 minutes.  Can be assembled in the baking dish up until the final bake and refrigerate overnight.

This Week's Box November 27th- December 1st, 2018

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1. IN THE BOX:

*Items in Box for 2

*Broccoli- Place in a breathable container or wrap in a damp towel before placing in the fridge. Lasts 1-2 weeks.

*Bok Choy- This crunchy and tasty bok choy is amazing sautéed and adds a little something special to a soup or stir-fry. Store in a plastic bag in fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs! 

*Leeks- These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

*Sweet Potatoes- Store in a cool, dark, well‐ventilated place. Never refrigerate ‐ sweet potatoes don't like the cold. Lasts up to 3 weeks if stored properly.

*Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week. 

*Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week. 

*Turnips- Remove the greens (store separately) same as radishes and beets, store them in an
open container with a moist cloth.

*Mandarins- They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. 

Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water. 

Spaghetti Squash- Store in a cool, dark, well ventilated place. Many growers say winter squash gets sweeter if they're stored for a week or so before eaten. Will last several weeks.

Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

Persimmons- Store at room temperature until ripe, then refrigerate in a plastic bag. Lasts several days once ripe.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Baked Spaghetti Squash Carbonara

Turnip Salad with Yogurt, Herbs and Poppy Seeds

Tofu Broccoli Bok Choy Stir Fry with Garlic Sesame Soy Sauce and Soba Noodles

Sweet Potato Fries

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Baked Spaghetti Squash Carbonara

8 oz Bacon -8 to 10 slices, diced

1 small Yellow Onion, diced OR skip the -onion and use Leeks

4 large Eggs

1/2 cup Ricotta Cheese

1 1/4 cups Parmesan cheese, or mix of Parmesan and Pecorino, divided

Turnip Salad with Yogurt, Herbs and Poppy Seeds

1 Lemon, halved

1/2 tsp dried Chile Flakes

1/2 cup plain Yogurt (not Greek Yogurt)

1 cup lightly packed mixes herbs: Mint, Parsley, Chives, cut in 2” lengths

4 Scallions, trimmed - including 1/2” off the green tops, sliced on a sharp angle, soaked in ice water for 20 minutes, and drained well-Extra Virgin Olive Oil

1/4 cup Poppy Seeds

Tofu Broccoli Bok Choy Stir Fry with Garlic Sesame Soy Sauce and Soba Noodles

7 oz tofu pressed lightly and cubes

1 TB Maple Syrup

3 TB Tamari or Soy Sauce

1 TB Sesame Oil

1/2 tsp White Pepper

1 TB Rice Vinegar

1/2 tsp Garlic granule or Garlic Paste

1/2 tsp Ginger Powder

For the Stir Fry:

8 oz Soba Noodles

1 tsp Coconut

4 cloves Garlic, chopped

1/4 tsp Pepper Flakes

2 TB Sesame Seeds

Sweet Potato Fries

1 TB Sweet Smoke Paprika

1/2 tsp cayenne

3 Garlic cloves, crushed

3 Tb Polenta

7 TB Olive Oil

1 TB Sumac



Giving Thanks

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It feels a little strange to be celebrating; anywhere you go in Bay Area, vistas look like apocalyptic sci-fi movie sets.  The smoke is a 24 hour reminder that just a short drive from us people have lost everything.  Knowing this I think it is a struggle for us to be joyful, but as Thanksgiving approaches we can always remember to give thanks.

This year I give thanks for the food we grow and all that it has brought to my life, and for me that is a large web.  Of course one of my first thoughts always goes to the incredible bounty we bring home from the market when we trade with other vendors.  The beauty of barter is those coffee vendors, cheese makers, sausage stuffers, kimchi fermenters, and cookie bakers, are so excited to get fresh vegetables from us, just as excited as I am to get all that they produce.  It is a really sweet deal, one that is based on relationships, connections and shared experiences.  We are all in it together at the market when the rain falls, the wind blows and the smoke fills the sky.  Even though those slow markets are a disappointment for all our hard work, we are at least rewarded with lots and lots of treats.

Besides the market, the food our farm grows has given me the opportunity to go into classrooms and show kids how to make soup.  It also gives me a story to tell in front of large crowds.  I get to cook special dinners for people who want an experience on the farm.  I have a life filled with a purpose, to show people just how simple and delicious eating fresh from the farm truly is.  

And of course, the bounty of the farm brings me all of you. To all of you long time CSA members I can never thank you enough for being a part of our lives and letting us be a part of yours.  Many of you have raised your children with a weekly box from this farm.  They learned that vegetables come out of a box with a newsletter telling them stories about their farm.  And for you who are new to Eatwell, thank you for giving us the chance to show you a different way to approach food. I hope you all find a way to make it to the farm to connect with the land that grows your food.  

Lastly, I will forever be grateful for my farmer man who changed my life in so many ways.  Because of him, I am here, living a life filled with community and purpose.  

Happy Thanksgiving Y’all

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