Planting & Tracking

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For months Cameron worked on the database of all that we grow. That task was completed and all the seed and transplant orders for the entire year were sent off to Headstart in December.  The first transplants arrived a week ago, and this week the first of them went into the ground.  This is a giant circle of life and processing.  As a mom, I am extremely proud of Cameron for taking on this challenge and getting it done. Most starting farmers begin with a few acres, Cameron had to jump in, with no prior training, at a rather large level. The stress of keeping mistakes to a minimum is fairly significant, well at least for me it is. 

The next step in creating a system that tracks and duplicates Nigel’s brain is to track what goes where. Which plants are in which bed, in which rows, in which field. How many plants and which variety? Dates it was planted, then eventually dates harvested. Cameron has been working on an AirTable that the guys will have access to as an app on their phones, so this info can be entered in as it all happens.  Progress is a great thing, and in our own little way, modern technology plays an enormous role. To help the guys track what bed, row, field, Cameron put out colored flags to help with the counting. We have discovered that on the leased side of the farm, there are over 200 beds in one field!  A lot to keep track of.

A Different Way Of Looking at the Farm

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When Nigel and I would walk the farm, we saw everything from very different perspectives. He saw crops and yields, I saw dishes and dinner. I was reminded of this as I was walking back to the house and passed a field of leeks and fennel.  My first reaction was Oh, I love roasting fennel and leeks together, yum! I am sure Nigel’s would have been, looks like we are getting to the end with these crops. Fennel is beginning to bloom, leeks are looking a little weak. I wonder if I will ever become a farmer first, cook/lover of food second? I doubt it.

This Week's Box: February 19- February 25th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Spinach- Store in the bag, unwashed, in the crisper. Take out what you plan on using and wash as you go. Will last 3-5 days.

*Fennel- If used within a couple days, fennel can be left out on the counter, upright in a cup or bowl of water (like celery). If wanting to keep longer than a few days, place in the fridge in a closed container with a little water. 

*Mandarins- They will keep a day or two at room temperature and up to a week in the crisper drawer of the refrigerator. 

*Cilantro- As soon as you arrive home with fresh cilantro, place the stems (with roots intact if attached) in a glass of water and cover the top loosely with a plastic bag. Refrigerate. Snip off leaves as you need them and recover. The water should be changed every 2 to 3 days. Do not wash the herb until you are ready to use it since excess moisture will turn the leaves to green slime during storage. Will last up to a week. 

*Kale- Refrigerate in a plastic bag, do not wash until ready to use. May keep for up to a week.

*Radishes- Remove the greens (store separately) so they don't draw out excess moisture from the roots. Place them in an open container in the fridge with a wet towel placed on top. Lasts up to one week.  

Romanesco- Will last up to one week in a closed container in the fridge, but has better flavor if consumed earlier. Cut florets away from the core and soak in warm soapy water or salt water for 10 minutes to wash away any aphids. Florets can also be lightly boiled in salt water for a couple of minutes for this purpose. Rinse before preparing.

Bok Choy-  Store in a plastic bag in the fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

*Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*Carrots- Store in the crisper wrapped to prevent drying out. Should last at least 7 days.

*Leeks- These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

Lemons- This versatile fruit adds a great touch to winter greens and salads. It will store longer, several weeks if wrapped and placed in crisper of the fridge, but if you are going to use it within a few days it can be stored on the counter.

Grapefruit- Grapefruits can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks or refrigerated for up to several weeks. Keep away from direct sunlight and heat.

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Bok Choy with Miso Sesame Glaze

Citrus Salad

Chicken Ragu with Bacon & Fennel

Sauteed Kale and Radishes in Tomato Bagna Cauda

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Bok Choy with Miso Sesame Glaze

2 TB White or Yellow Miso Paste

1/2 cup Dashi, Fish Stock or Eatwell Chicken Stock

1 to 2 tsp Fish Sauce

2 TB unrefined Virgin Coconut Oil

1” knob of Ginger, peeled

2 TB Sesame Seeds

Shopping list for Citrus Salad

Olive Oil

Red Wine Vinegar

Shopping list for Chicken Ragu with Bacon & Fennel

6 oz thick Bacon, about 3 strips, diced

1 large Onion, diced (perhaps use your Leeks)

6 cloves Garlic, minced

1 lb boneless, skinless Chicken Thighs, cut into large pieces

2 TB Flour

2 cups Chicken Broth

Shopping list for Sauteed Kale and Radishes in Tomato Bagna Cauda

1/4 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

5 Garlic cloves, finely chopped

7 Anchovy Fillets in oil, drained and chopped

3 TB Tomato Paste

2 TB Chives, chopped

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Citrus Salad

This is another suggestion from one of our Slack members.  JB’s version used Pomelo, actually this is hubby’s recipe, but JB posted!  It was also made with arugula but I would suggest spinach since that is what is in the box this week.  

Salad:

Grapefruit sections, cut into bite size pieces

Slivered Fennel

Spinach, well washed

A bit of Orange for some sweetness (maybe use some Mandarins?)

Dressing:

Olive Oil

Red Wine Vinegar

Salt and Pepper

Sauteed Kale and Radishes in Tomato Bagna Cauda

Recipe by Kay Chun from Food & Wine

1/4 cup Extra Virgin Olive Oil

5 Garlic cloves, finely chopped

7 Anchovy Fillets in oil, drained and chopped

3 TB Tomato Paste

1 1/2 LBs Kale, stems discarded and leaves chopped

6 oz Radishes, halved if large

3 TB Lemon Juice

2 TB Chives, chopped

Kosher Salt and freshly ground Pepper

In a large saucepan, heat the olive oil.  Add the garlic, anchovies and tomato paste and cook over moderately low heat, stirring frequently, until the tomato paste is deep red, about 7 minutes.  Add the kale, radishes and 1/2 cup of water and cook, stirring, until the kale is softened, about 5 minutes.  Stir in the lemon juice and chives, season with salt and pepper and serve warm.

 

Chicken Ragu with Bacon & Fennel

Recipe by Faith Durand from The Kitchn

6 oz thick Bacon, about 3 strips, diced

1 large Onion, diced (perhaps use your Leeks)

6 cloves Garlic, minced

1 small Fennel Bulb, trimmed and diced

1 lb boneless, skinless Chicken Thighs, cut into large pieces

2 TB Flour

2 cups Chicken Broth

Salt and freshly ground Pepper, to taste

Cook the bacon over low heat in a Dutch over heavy pot for 5 to 10 minutes, until the fat has rendered out and the bacons getting crispy.  Stir in the onion, garlic, and fennel until coated with the bacon fat, and cook over low to medium heat for 5 to 8 minutes or until soft and glistening.  Push the vegetables to the edge of the pan and turn the heat to medium-high.  Sear the chicken thigh pieces in the center of the pot for about 3 minutes, turning frequently.  The goal is not to develop a dark sear or crust on the chicken, but just to start the cooking.  Stir in the flour.  Pour in the chicken broth, brig to a boil, then lower the heat to a simmer.  Partially cover the pot and cook for 1 hour or until the chicken is very tender.  Vigorously work through the pot with two forks to shred the meat fine.  Taste before serving and add salt or other seasonings, if needed.  Serve with gnocchi, or pasta, brown rice or roasted vegetables.  Leftovers freeze very well.

Bok Choy with Miso Sesame Glaze

Recipe from nourishedkitchen.com

2 TB White or Yellow Miso Paste

1/2 cup Dashi, Fish Stock or Eatwell Chicken Stock

1 to 2 tsp Fish Sauce

2 TB unrefined Virgin Coconut Oil

1” knob of Ginger, peeled

1 bunch Bok Choy, rinsed and patted dry

2 TB Sesame Seeds

Dissolve two TB white or yellow miso paste and 1/2 cup of warm dashi or stock, until clumps of miso have been thoroughly combined with the stock, and the mixture is smooth and thinly velvet-like texture.  Stir in one to two tsp fish sauce and set aside.  Heat 2 TB coconut oil in a skillet over a medium flame until melted and sizzling.  Julienne the freshly peeled ginger by cutting it into thin matchsticks and toss these into the hot fat, gently stirring until the ginger perfumes the fat with its bright and vibrant fragrance.  Add a whole, intact bunch of bok choy to the seasoned fat and fry on one side for one to two minutes until the bok choy begins to blister slightly, then turn it over to the other sideband continue to cook foremother one to two minutes.  Pour the mixture of a stock and miso over the bok choy, reduce the heat to medium-low and cover.  Simmer for six to eight minutes or until the bok choy wilts and is pierced easily by the tines of a fork. Plate the cooked bok choy and any remaining juices, then sprinkle one tote TB Sesame Seeds over the dish before serving right away.

Missed The Photo OP

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The poplars are still leafless, so you can see many nests.  As we walked to the end of the farm, I looked up and spotted a giant owl sitting just below one of the nests.  Sadly I didn’t have my camera open and in my hand.  Before I got it all together I watched that majestic bird fly away.  What a wing span! I really can’t get over how many birds we have living with us here at Eatwell.  I was never a fan of our winged friends (that dates back to early childhood trauma), but my love is quickly growing.  The owls and hawks are great because they help us reduce the rodent population.  With the amount of ground squirrels we have, we can use all the help we can get.

Our First Headstart Order 2018

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The first major project Cameron worked on when he came back to the farm last summer was our seed/Headstart orders.  I can’t tell you what an enormous project this was, there were so many layers and pieces to consider, it made me feel like my head would explode.  Nigel had most of this information in his head, and over the past few years, with all the cancer treatment, he hadn’t kept logs.  

We now have a giant spread sheet that tells us what seeds, which variety, how many, from whom, days to germination, when the seeds arrive here or go to Headstart, which weeks do we expect those starts and when does that crop go into your CSA box.  It is crazy, but with that information Cameron and I sat down in early December and got our seed/Headstart orders put together for all of 2018!  POs were created for the entire year, and last Thursday, the first one arrived.  I think we both felt a good amount of satisfaction.  Wonder how I will feel when I see the bill :)

Help! What Do I Do With….

One of the biggest issues that faces those of you who are smart enough to get your veg straight from a farm CSA, is “what do I do with these things I have never had before???” It is one of the biggest reasons people are afraid to join a CSA. Funny how we are programmed, isn’t it? To be afraid of vegetables. In any case, we have help for you, and I know many of you aren’t even aware of it.  On the website you will find information about how to store each item in your share, and what you should eat first, and what is ok to hold and store. To make finding that information easy, we include a link in the weekly “Don’t Forget To Pickup Your Box” email.  The website also has loads of recipes. The Eatwell’ers Slack group is another great resource. I find when I ask for help on Slack, I almost always get an answer within a couple of hours. This week was a great example! I asked for a recipe using Bok Choy that was different from the typical stir fry and boom! One of our members posted the perfect recipe for this week’s share. I have included it in the recipes. Big Thank You to Celeste who shared it.

Chickens And Eggs

This is an article from the newsletter of February 2, 1999.  

Most of us are pretty addicted to our Eatwell Eggs, and find the notion of having an egg Off Season unimaginable, but that is how it was back in the beginning. And I believe there was a gap of several years when Nigel gave up on the chickens altogether, now that is truly unimaginable! The chickens play a major role on the farm, fertility, pest and weed control, and of course those delicious eggs. Running a chicken operation like ours is an enormous commitment, financially and in terms of man hours, but very much worth it.  

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A quick side note: As Cameron and I headed out for our weekly farm walk, we found Jose and Agustin in the process of moving the house that has the newest flock of birds.  When chicks first arrive, their house is parked up next to the pond.   Up here we have access to power for their lights.  The girls are just about 3 months old, and getting really big.  They are ready for some pasture, so it is moving day.  Big problem, flat tires on the house!  Agustin and Jose had to lift the house just a little with the forklift we borrow from our generous neighbors next door.  It is challenging lifting those giant houses, but they got the job done, and the girls are now out on pasture.  Pullet lovers, we have about 3 months to go before they start laying. 

Here are the words from that long ago newsletter article by Nigel:

“Many of you are asking when the egg subscriptions will return.  The ‘Ladies’ have just gone through the molting process when they grow a new set of feathers and shed the old ones.  They look very fine now.  Our plan for the chickens was to have them as part of the farm’s fertility program.  They are moved around every three months or so.  We are currently evaluating the costs and benefits to see where we proceed from here.  There will be egg subscriptions offered soon, on a limited basis.  Watch this space for more details.”

This Week's Box: February 12th - February 18th

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CONTENTS:

  1. In the box - and how to store it

  2. This Week's Recipes

  3. Shopping List

  4. Link to Digital Copy of Newsletter

1. IN THE BOX (IN ORDER OF WHAT TO EAT FIRST):

*Items in Box for 2

Pea Shoots- Pea shoots are the leaves and tendrils of pea plants. Place them inside a brown paper bag, or wrap them with paper towel, and place in the crisper drawer of your refrigerator. They should last 2 to 3 days.

*Arugula- Wash and dry well. Wrap with a damp paper towel and store in a glass container in the fridge. Lasts up to 5 days.

*Dill- Keeps well in your fridge. Should last up to 7 days. For best results put stems in a jar with clean water as a vase and cover with a plastic bag to keep protected culture.

*Cabbage- Wrap cabbage in plastic wrap and keep it chilled in the refrigerator. An alternative to plastic would be placing it in a tightly-locking container that limits air flow. Properly stored, cabbage should last about a week.  

Turnips- If the turnips came with tops (the leaves still on), and you plan on using the tops, cut off the leaves, bag them separately, and refrigerate the roots unwashed in a plastic bag. They should keep anywhere from 1 to 2 weeks in the refrigerator. Eat the leaves within 3 days.  

*Romanesco- Will last up to one week in a closed container in the fridge, but has better flavor if consumed earlier. Cut florets away from the core and soak in warm soapy water or salt water for 10 minutes to wash away any aphids. Florets can also be lightly boiled in salt water for a couple of minutes for this purpose. Rinse before preparing.

*Bok Choy-  Store in a plastic bag in the fridge up to one week. Don’t forget to use the ribs!

Lettuce- Keep damp in an airtight container in the fridge. Keeps for one week.

*Carrots- Store in the crisper wrapped to prevent drying out. Should last at least 7 days.

Leeks- These large alliums are rather mild in flavor and simply melt to perfection when sautéed. Use in soups, stir-fries, or in place of onions in other dishes for a delicious and more subtle flavor. Save the dark green tops for making vegetable stock! Leave in an open container in the crisper wrapped in a damp cloth or in a shallow cup of water on the counter (just so the very bottom of the stem has water).  Will last at least a week.

Pomelos- Pomelos are the largest citrus fruit. Pomelos can be stored at room temperature for a couple of weeks or refrigerated for up to several weeks. Keep away from direct sunlight and heat.

*Apples- Apples last much longer if they are placed loosely in the bin of your refrigerator. Wrapping them in brown paper from grocery sacks will also help to keep in the moisture of the apple. Keep apples slightly apart from each other. Lasts up to 2 months.  

2. THIS WEEK'S RECIPES

Creamy Winter Vegetable Stew With Mustard and Lemon

Creamy Pasta with Ham and Pea Shoots

Hearty Cabbage Soup

Lacto-Fermented Vegetables

3. SHOPPING LIST FOR ALL RECIPES (ASSUMES YOU HAVE SALT, PEPPER, AND WATER):

Shopping list for Creamy Winter Vegetable Stew With Mustard and Lemo

1 TB Virgin Olive Oil

1 large Onion, small dice - about 1 3/4 cups

4 cloves Garlic, minced

2 tsp minced fresh Thyme leaves

1 medium parsnip, peeled and chopped (substitute turnips and or carrot)

1 1/2 cups Celery Root (potato instead?), peeled, chopped into 1” pieces

1 1/2 TB grainy Mustard

2 tsp Nutritional Yeast

1 tsp Old Bay Seasoning

1/4 cup fresh Lemon Juice

3 1/2 cups Vegetable Stock, plus extra if needed

Shopping list for Creamy Pasta with Ham and Pea Shoots

1 lb Pasta, I used Spaghetti because that is what I had

1 cup or more Ham, cut into 1/2” cubes

1 1/2 to 2 cups Cream

3 TB Butter

Salt and Pepper

Nutmeg, to taste

Parmesan Cheese

Shopping list for Hearty Cabbage Soup

2 TB Butter

1 large Onion, diced

1 stalk Celery, diced

3 Potatoes, peeled and thickly sliced

6 cups Chicken Stock, divided

2 TB Flour

1/2 cup Sour Cream

Salt and Pepper, to taste

Shopping list for Lacto-Fermented Vegetables

1 tsp fresh, grated Ginger

1/4 tsp Red Pepper flakes

2 TB Sea Salt

4 cups Water

4. CLICK HERE TO GO TO THE NEWSLETTERS PAGE AT WWW.EATWELL.COM. CLICK ON THE DATE OF THE NEWSLETTER TO DOWNLOAD A PDF COPY OF THIS WEEK'S NEWSLETTER IN COLOR.

Creamy Pasta with Ham and Pea Shoots

Next month I am going to visit Emily, our former CSA Manager, in northern Italy!  Looking at places to visit in that region of Italy, one can not ignore the fact that you are in the heart of Parmesan and Prosciutto country!  Looking at pictures I found myself suffering with an intense craving for a cream based pasta sauce with ham and peas.  Well I had ham and I had pea shoots and I had cream, craving very much satisfied!  So here is what I did….

1 lb Pasta, I used Spaghetti because that is what I had

1/2 to 1 full bunch of Pea Shoots, washed and chopped

1 cup or more Ham, cut into 1/2” cubes

1 1/2 to 2 cups Cream

3 TB Butter

Salt and Pepper

Nutmeg, to taste

Parmesan Cheese

Bring a large pot of salted water to boil, and cook pasta according to package directions.

In a heavy-bottomed sauce pan, heat the cream with the pea shoots, ham, a bit of nutmeg and the butter.  Bring to a low simmer and allow to cook for a few minutes to infuse the cream with the flavor of the ham.  Just before the pasta is done, add a good amount (3 TB?) of Parmesan to the cream sauce, and stir well.  Taste and add salt and pepper as desired. When the pasta is done, drain it and quickly rinse away the starch.  You can add a bit of olive oil or butter to the pasta.  Plate up the pasta and ladle on as much sauce as you like.  I use tongs to mix it well in the bowl.  I keep the pasta and sauce separate because if you have leftovers, it will keep better.  If you pre-mix it all, and you do have leftovers, the pasta will absorb all the sauce.

Lacto-Fermented Vegetables

One of our Slack Eatwellers, Maggie shared this recipe last week Sichuan PaoCai Sichuan Pickles, the recipe is from Food52.  It reminded me of how great pickling/fermenting is to use up bits and bobs that you haven’t finished off in other dishes.  And you could certainly add some Bok Choy stems:). You can find this particular recipe on Food52 or on our Slack page.  At the Cultures For Health website you will find many basic recipes for fermented vegetables, many are in our current box rotations.  Here is a recipe for fermented Carrots and Parsnips, but I am using Turnips, since we do not grow Parsnips.

1 lb Turnips

1 lb Carrots

1 tsp fresh, grated Ginger

1/4 tsp Red Pepper flakes

2 TB Sea Salt

4 cups Water

 

Wash turnips and carrots well.  Remove tops and cut lengthwise into rounds.  Place grated ginger and red pepper flakes in the bottom of a quart jar.  Place turnips and carrots atop ginger and red pepper flakes, alternating and packing them in tight.  Leave 1” of headspace at the top of the jar.  Make a brine of 4 cups water to 2 TB sea salt.  Stir to dissolve salt and pour over vegetables, leaving 1” headspace.  Place the lid on the jar.  Ferment at room temp for 5 to 10 days.  You will want to burp the jar daily to release the fermentation gases.  Also, you want to make sure the turnips and carrots remain submerged.  My experience with our vegetables has been a fast fermentation, so give it a taste after a few days to see where you are.  Once it is done, should have a nice kraut-y tang, you can store it in the fridge.

 

Hearty Cabbage Soup

Recipe from Genius Kitchen Rick Young

2 TB Butter

1 large Onion, diced

1 stalk Celery, diced

2 cups Cabbage, shredded

3 Potatoes, peeled and thickly sliced

6 cups Chicken Stock, divided

1 TB fresh Dill, chopped

2 TB Flour

1/2 cup Sour Cream

Salt and Pepper, to taste

Melt butter in saucepan over medium heat.  Add onion, celery, cabbage, salt, and pepper.  Partly cover and cook for 10 minutes over low heat.  Add potatoes, chicken stock, and dill.  Bring to a boil while stirring periodically.  Boil, partly covered, for 20 minutes.  Mix the flour with the sour cream in a bowl.  Add 1/2 cup of the hot soup stock to bowl, mix well and pour into soup.  Mix well and serve.

Creamy Winter Vegetable Stew With Mustard and Lemon

Recipe from The First Mess by Laura Wright

Laura’s idea for this recipe was to use many winter-white veggies, but as we do not have parsnips, perhaps you could use a bit of carrot or turnips?  It also calls for celery root (celeriac), but I think you could use some potato instead.  

1 TB Virgin Olive Oil

1 large Onion, small dice - about 1 3/4 cups

1 Leek, small dice - white and light green part only

4 cloves Garlic, minced

2 tsp minced fresh Thyme leaves

1 medium parsnip, peeled and chopped (substitute turnips and or carrot)

1 1/2 cups Celery Root (potato instead?), peeled, chopped into 1” pieces

2 cups Romanesco florets (original recipe is cauliflower) 

1 1/2 TB grainy Mustard

Salt and Pepper, to taste

2 tsp Nutritional Yeast

1 tsp Old Bay Seasoning

1/4 cup fresh Lemon Juice

3 1/2 cups Vegetable Stock, plus extra if needed

Heat the olive oil in a large, heavy bottomed pot over medium heat.  Add the diced onions and saute until soft and translucent, about 4 minutes.  Add the leeks and continue to saute until the leeks are soft, about 4 minutes more.  Add the minced garlic and thyme, and cook until fragrant, about 30 seconds, stirring constantly.  Add the chopped parsnip (turnips and or carrots), celery root (potato) and Romanesco florets and stir to coat in the oil.  Add the grainy mustard, salt and pepper, nutritional yeast and Old Bay seasoning.  Stir to coat vegetables in the spices.  Add the lemon juice and stir.  Add the vegetable stock, stir again, cover, and bring to a boil.  Once boiling, remove the lid and reduce the heat to a simmer.  Let the chowder cook and bubble until the root veg are tender, about 15 to 18 minutes.  Ladle half of the stew into a blender and carefully puree until smooth.  Pour the pureed portion of stew back into the soup pot.  If the stew is too thick, add enough vegetable stock to loosen it up to your liking.  Bring the stew back to a boil and serve hot.

Tea Party On The Farm

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Last week the weather was glorious. Low 70s, sunny, beautiful blue skies and the hills and orchards are green. Sometimes I wish I could share these special days with all of you, and then I realized I could, at least with a few of you.  I decided to have a last minute Tea Party.  One of my favorite things about England is afternoon tea.  I love clotted cream, finger sandwiches, scones, lemon curd and little pastries.  Sitting around the table enjoying a proper tea, and glorious weather, was the perfect way to spend an early Saturday afternoon.  By the end of our event season I am pretty exhausted, but by this time I am really missing the chance to visit with you all.  So watch for an email letting you know that Lorraine is having a little afternoon party on the farm. And if you are interested in having your own private party, please keep us in mind. The farmhouse can easily handle a sit-down for 18, and we can push it to 24 if we squeeze everyone in. One last thought, I would love to learn how to make marmalade and jam. Would anyone like to come to the farm and teach a class to a small group?  Let me know, you can text me at 530-554-3971.

Visitors from Spain

Sometimes you meet people and immediately connect with them, and that was how it was with Paul and Mar.  Originally they found us at the Market, saw all that we are doing and spoke with Natasha at the stand about Eatwell.  Paul and Mar own an Ecolodge in Andalucia - Al Limon, and they are traveling around Northern California visiting places they feel resonates with what they are doing in Spain. Eatwell was a perfect place to stop for a visit on the way up to Sierra Hot Springs.  

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We had a great talk about the importance of supporting local producers and eating seasonally.  They were commenting on the abundance of organic produce coming from half way around the world.  At their breakfast that morning they were served lovely organic fruit but it had traveled from Chile and New Zealand.  While we all appreciate farm land being converted to organic, how does that allign with an ecological principal if we demand summer fruits in the winter?  Definitely kindred spirits.  We all are trying to make our little parcels in this world a better place.  Seeing the photos of Al Limon, it is clear there is much love for their land and their place. If any of you has an interest in visiting Spain, please consider staying at Al Limon. 

Paul originates from Nottingham, England, not far from where Nigel grew up, so his English is pretty good:) Mar is from Spain. They are passionately committed to creating a beautiful, restful space that embraces the natural beauty that surrounds them. Take a look at their website and you will see allimonecolodge.com. And if you do go, please tell them you are from Eatwell Farm!

Appreciating CSA, Written By Ashley Hathaway

Written By Ashley Hathaway, CSA Member since 2011

One of the primary reasons I choose to get my weekly supply of eggs and fresh produce from Eatwell Farm’s CSA membership is for the wonderful health benefits that come with eating properly grown, fresh, nutrient-dense, local organic foods.    Food plays one of the most critical roles in determining our health and well being. I have been studying the effects of nutrients on the body for over 10 years and as I continue to  learn about this complicated, fascinating and important subject, I appreciate Community Supported Agriculture more and more.

I discovered Eatwell Farm foods at a health conference several years ago and I’ve been hooked ever since. 

I'm grateful to live close to a farm like Eatwell that provides this beautiful food. Each week I throughly enjoy reading about life on the farm and what goes into growing the food in my box.   

Thank you to everyone at Eatwell Farm for your hard work and dedication to organic farming!

Potatoes!

The seed potatoes arrived last week.  Nigel was always so excited when potatoes arrived, it was one of his favorite crops.  These beauties will be ready late May early June, and I have to admit they are some of my favorties as well. We plant potatoes this time of year because the summers are so hot they don’t do do well during those months.  That is unfortunate because it would be lovely to have Eatwell potatoes for Thanksgiving.  We tried it a few years back but the yield was quite low.  And since then it seems that our summers have gotten hotter with each year.  We do have a good sized bed in the orchard, perhaps we can give it a try in there in the  future. During the summer months we can check the temperature and compare it to other areas around the farm to see if being tucked in between the trees helps keep it cooler.

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